35 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2020
  2. Mar 2020
    1. legitimate interest triggers when “processing is necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by the controller or by a third party, except where such interests are overridden by the interests or fundamental rights and freedoms of the data subject
    2. of the six lawful, GDPR-compliant ways companies can get the green light to process individual personal data, consent is the “least preferable.” According to guidelines in Article 29 Working Party from the European Commission, "a controller must always take time to consider whether consent is the appropriate lawful ground for the envisaged processing or whether another ground should be chosen instead." 
    3. “It is unfortunate that a lot of companies are blindly asking for consent when they don’t need it because they have either historically obtained the consent to contact a user,” said digital policy consultant Kristina Podnar. “Or better yet, the company has a lawful basis for contact. Lawful basis is always preferable to consent, so I am uncertain why companies are blindly dismissing that path in favor of consent.”
    1. Data has become a “natural resource” for advertising technology. “And, just as with every other precious resource, we all bear responsibility for its consumption,”
    2. To join the Privacy Shield Framework, a U.S.-based organization is required to self-certify to the Department of Commerce and publicly commit to comply with the Framework’s requirements. While joining the Privacy Shield is voluntary, the GDPR goes far beyond it.
    1. it would appear impossible to require a publisher to provide information on and obtain consent for the installation of cookies on his own website also with regard to those installed by “third parties**”
    2. Our solution goes a bit further than this by pointing to the browser options, third-party tools and by linking to the third party providers, who are ultimately responsible for managing the opt-out for their own tracking tools.
    3. You are also not required to manage consent for third-party cookies directly on your site/app as this responsibility falls to the individual third-parties. You are, however, required to at least facilitate the process by linking to the relevant policies of these third-parties.
    4. the publisher would be required to check, from time to time, that what is declared by the third parties corresponds to the purposes they are actually aiming at via their cookies. This is a daunting task because a publisher often has no direct contacts with all the third parties installing cookies via his website, nor does he/she know the logic underlying the respective processing.
    1. Decision point #2 – Do you send any data to third parties, directly or inadvertently? <img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-10174" src="https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart.png" alt="GDPR cookie consent flowchart" width="1451" height="601" srcset="https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart.png 1451w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-300x124.png 300w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-981x406.png 981w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-761x315.png 761w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-611x253.png 611w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-386x160.png 386w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-283x117.png 283w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-600x249.png 600w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-1024x424.png 1024w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-50x21.png 50w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-250x104.png 250w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-241x100.png 241w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-400x166.png 400w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-350x145.png 350w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-840x348.png 840w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-860x356.png 860w, https://www.jeffalytics.com/wp-content/uploads/7deb832d95678dc21cc23208d76f4144_Flowchart-1030x427.png 1030w" sizes="(max-width: 1451px) 100vw, 1451px" /> Remember, inadvertently transmitting data to third parties can occur through the plugins you use on your website. You don't necessarily have to be doing this proactively. If the answer is “Yes,” then to comply with GDPR, you should use a cookie consent popup.
    1. You must clearly identify each party that may collect, receive, or use end users’ personal data as a consequence of your use of a Google product. You must also provide end users with prominent and easily accessible information about that party’s use of end users’ personal data.
    1. GDPR introduces a list of data subjects’ rights that should be obeyed by both data processors and data collectors. The list includes: Right of access by the data subject (Section 2, Article 15). Right to rectification (Section 3, Art 16). Right to object to processing (Section 4, Art 21). Right to erasure, also known as ‘right to be forgotten’ (Section 3, Art 17). Right to restrict processing (Section 3, Art 18). Right to data portability (Section 3, Art 20).
    1. An example of reliance on legitimate interests includes a computer store, using only the contact information provided by a customer in the context of a sale, serving that customer with direct regular mail marketing of similar product offerings — accompanied by an easy-to-select choice of online opt-out.
    1. This is no different where legitimate interests applies – see the examples below from the DPN. It should also be made clear that individuals have the right to object to processing of personal data on these grounds.
    2. Individuals can object to data processing for legitimate interests (Article 21 of the GDPR) with the controller getting the opportunity to defend themselves, whereas where the controller uses consent, individuals have the right to withdraw that consent and the ‘right to erasure’. The DPN observes that this may be a factor in whether companies rely on legitimate interests.

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    1. Earlier this year it began asking Europeans for consent to processing their selfies for facial recognition purposes — a highly controversial technology that regulatory intervention in the region had previously blocked. Yet now, as a consequence of Facebook’s confidence in crafting manipulative consent flows, it’s essentially figured out a way to circumvent EU citizens’ fundamental rights — by socially engineering Europeans to override their own best interests.
    2. The deceitful obfuscation of commercial intention certainly runs all the way through the data brokering and ad tech industries that sit behind much of the ‘free’ consumer Internet. Here consumers have plainly been kept in the dark so they cannot see and object to how their personal information is being handed around, sliced and diced, and used to try to manipulate them.
    3. design choices are being selected to be intentionally deceptive. To nudge the user to give up more than they realize. Or to agree to things they probably wouldn’t if they genuinely understood the decisions they were being pushed to make.
    1. Consent is one of six lawful grounds for processing data. It may be arguable that anti-spam measures such as reCaptcha can fall under "legitimate interests" (ie you don't need to ask for consent)
    1. startup focused on creating transparency in data. All that stuff you keep reading about the shenanigans with companies mishandling people's data? That's what we are working on fixing.
  3. Jul 2018
    1. David Golumbia provides a list of six types of personal data: provided, observed, derived, inferred, anonymised and aggregate.

  4. Sep 2016
  5. Jul 2016
    1. E-texts could record how much time is spent in textbook study. All such data could be accessed by the LMS or various other applications for use in analytics for faculty and students.”
  6. Apr 2016
    1. We should have control of the algorithms and data that guide our experiences online, and increasingly offline. Under our guidance, they can be powerful personal assistants.

      Big business has been very militant about protecting their "intellectual property". Yet they regard every detail of our personal lives as theirs to collect and sell at whim. What a bunch of little darlings they are.

  7. thenewinquiry.com thenewinquiry.com
    1. In December 2014, FitBit released a pledge stating that it “is deeply committed to protecting the security of your data.” Still, we may soon be obliged to turn over the sort of information the device is designed to collect in order to obtain medical coverage or life insurance. Some companies currently offer incentives like discounted premiums to members who volunteer information from their activity trackers. Many health and fitness industry experts say it is only a matter of time before all insurance providers start requiring this information.
  8. Dec 2015
    1. A personal API builds on the domain concept—students store information on their site, whether it’s class assignments, financial aid information or personal blogs, and then decide how they want to share that data with other applications and services. The idea is to give students autonomy in how they develop and manage their digital identities at the university and well into their professional lives