14 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Second, you cannot simply add the cookie language to your existing Terms and Conditions because you need to gain consent specifically for the use of cookies. This means, if you already have users who have agreed to your T&Cs, after adding the cookie language you will need to prompt them to review and agree to the new T&Cs.
    1. If your agreement with Google incorporates this policy, or you otherwise use a Google product that incorporates this policy, you must ensure that certain disclosures are given to, and consents obtained from, end users in the European Economic Area along with the UK. If you fail to comply with this policy, we may limit or suspend your use of the Google product and/or terminate your agreement.
    2. You must clearly identify each party that may collect, receive, or use end users’ personal data as a consequence of your use of a Google product. You must also provide end users with prominent and easily accessible information about that party’s use of end users’ personal data.
  2. Mar 2020
    1. Because humans hate being bored or confused and there are countless ways to make decisions look off-puttingly boring or complex — be it presenting reams of impenetrable legalese in tiny greyscale lettering so no-one will bother reading
    1. Though not always legally required, terms & conditions (also called ToS – terms of service, terms of use, or EULA – end user license agreement) are pragmatically required. It governs the contractual relationship between you and your users and sets the way in which your product, service or content may be used, in a legally binding way. It is therefore essential for protecting your content from a copyright perspective as well as protecting you from potential liabilities. They typically contain copyright clauses, disclaimers and terms of sale, allow you to set governing law, list mandatory consumer protection clauses, and more.
    1. "I have read and agree to the terms and conditions” may well be the most common lie in the history of civilization. How many times do you scroll and click accept without a second thought? You’re not alone. Not only they go unread, but they also include a self-updating clause requiring you to go back and review those documents for changes. You’re agreeing to any changes, and their consequences, indefinitely. 
    1. And, frankly, we’re abetting this behavior. Most users just click or tap “okay” to clear the pop-up and get where they’re going. They rarely opt to learn more about what they’re agreeing to. Research shows that the vast majority of internet users don’t read terms of service or privacy policies — so they’re probably not reading cookie policies, either. They’re many pages long, and they’re not written in language that’s simple enough for the average person to understand.
    2. But in the end, they’re not doing much: Most of us just tediously click “yes” and move on.
    3. The site invites you to read its “cookie policy,” (which, let’s be honest, you’re not going to do), and it may tell you the tracking is to “enhance” your experience — even though it feels like it’s doing the opposite.
  3. Jan 2020
    1. Temporary access

      Large portions of the material below this read more like a Terms of Service than a Code of Conduct. It might be more useful to split these into two pages to better delineate the two ideas.

      (Original annotation at https://boffosocko.com/2020/01/10/code-of-conduct-openetc/#Temporary%20access)

  4. Jun 2017
    1. Bill Fitzgerald provides some useful tips recently in a webinar in regards to Terms of Service. He suggested searching for the following words associated with consent forms: third party, affiliations, change, update and modify.

  5. May 2016
    1. including the use of passwords to gain access to your personal information.

      Why is this noteworthy?

    2. we make it available on our homepage and at every point where we request your personal information

      Why is this noteworthy?

  6. Nov 2015