16 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1. The banner is not necessarily required in this specific instance if the cookie policy is easily accessible and visible from every page of the site.
    2. Because using cookies means both processing user data and installing files that could be used for tracking, it is a major point of concern when it comes to user data privacy rights.
  2. Mar 2020
    1. The Cookie Law does not require that records of consent be kept but instead indicates that you should be able to prove that consent occurred (even if that consent has been withdrawn). The simple way to do this would be to use a cookie management solution that employs a prior blocking mechanism as under such circumstances, cookie installing scripts will only be run after consent is attained. In this way, the very fact that scripts were run may be used as sufficient proof of consent.
    2. You are also not required to manage consent for third-party cookies directly on your site/app as this responsibility falls to the individual third-parties. You are, however, required to at least facilitate the process by linking to the relevant policies of these third-parties.
    3. conspicuously provide the option for obtaining informed consent, provide a means for the withdrawal of consent and guarantee, via prior blocking, that no tracking is performed before the user has provided consent.
    4. the Cookie Law does not require that you provide users with the means to toggle cookie preferences directly on your site/app
    5. the publisher would be required to check, from time to time, that what is declared by the third parties corresponds to the purposes they are actually aiming at via their cookies. This is a daunting task because a publisher often has no direct contacts with all the third parties installing cookies via his website, nor does he/she know the logic underlying the respective processing.
    6. When you think about data law and privacy legislations, cookies easily come to mind as they’re directly related to both. This often leads to the common misconception that the Cookie Law (ePrivacy directive) has been repealed by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which in fact, it has not. Instead, you can instead think of the ePrivacy Directive and GDPR as working together and complementing each other, where, in the case of cookies, the ePrivacy generally takes precedence.
    1. Are cookies governed by the GDPR? Cookie usage and it’s related consent acquisition are not governed by the GDPR, they are instead governed by the ePrivacy Directive (Cookie Law) which in future will be repealed by the up-coming ePrivacy Regulation.
    1. the introduction of the EU’s General Data-Protection Regulation (GDPR) has significantly impacted the way websites and business collect, store and use both types of cookies. For one, the GDPR includes cookies in its definition of personal data, which refers to any piece of data or information that can identify a visitor.
    1. In accordance with the general principles of privacy law, which do not permit the processing of data prior to consent, the cookie law does not allow the installation of cookies before obtaining the user’s consent, except for exempt categories.
    1. However, we recognise there are some differing opinions as well as practical considerations around the use of partial cookie walls and we will be seeking further submissions and opinions on this point from interested parties.
    2. While we recognise that analytics can provide you with useful information, they are not part of the functionality that the user requests when they use your online service – for example, if you didn’t have analytics running, the user could still be able to access your service. This is why analytics cookies aren’t strictly necessary and so require consent.