19 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. This brings me to the crucial issue. Unlike the position that exists in the physical sciences, in economics and other disciplines that deal with essentially complex phenomena, the aspects of the events to be accounted for about which we can get quantitative data are necessarily limited and may not include the important ones. While in the physical sciences it is generally assumed, probably with good reason, that any important factor which determines the observed events will itself be directly observable and measurable, in the study of such complex phenomena as the market, which depend on the actions of many individuals, all the circumstances which will determine the outcome of a process, for reasons which I shall explain later, will hardly ever be fully known or measurable. And while in the physical sciences the investigator will be able to measure what, on the basis of a prima facie theory, he thinks important, in the social sciences often that is treated as important which happens to be accessible to measurement. This is sometimes carried to the point where it is demanded that our theories must be formulated in such terms that they refer only to measurable magnitudes.
  2. Oct 2019
    1. Zachary Stein - "On the Ethics of Planetary Scale Measurement Meta-Structures"

      "We measure what we care about and we care about what we measure."

      "You could be handed a measure and start caring about something that you didn't care about before, just because you're measuring it now."

      "... it's the locus of trust. It's part of the common wealth of the community is a trustworthy measure. The only way that a community can work. And then of course they encode power..."

      "Measurements help certain groups understand things."

      "In fact maybe we should pause and think very deeply about the whole domain of things that we shouldn't ever measure.... A meta-modern approach to measurement, respects the immeasurable and partitions off regions that are not to be measured."

      "Once you start to factor all of these things (meaning, ethics, objectivity, efficiency) that's when you realize we should not measure some stuff."

      "People who think about measuring new things should also think about the ontology of absence. ... Every time you measure something, think about what you left out."

      "Measurement simplifies complexity by showing you "this" at the expense of "that". So the meta-modern approach is like I see this but I'm also aware of that"

      "Who is measuring who? for what purpose? who is deciding what well being is?"

      "Put the measurement tools into users hands. Don't come from behind the curtain and say ta-daa this is your score. Let them configure and play with the assessments themselves. This will lead to a better assessment system because a million minds are better than a hundred (or whatever your team-size is. Secondly, it empowers as opposed to just internalize."

      "As much as possible empower the person who is being measured, let them see how they're being measured, and actually be able to augment the measure so it's like if you have a mirror, you want to be able to clean the mirror, adjust angles, magnify etc. you want to have that capability for them (measured ones). And then they feel like they are not a test subject, but participants"

    1. It must also understand why different outsourcing projects succeed or fail. The Institute for Government has previously showed that there are several conditions that make outsourcing more likely to succeed.2 Above all, these include: •the existence of a competitive market of high-quality suppliers•the ease of measuring the value added by the provider •the service not being so integral to the nature of government as to make outsourcing inappropriate.*

      Outsourcing conditions

    1. So, maybe all measurement is just training? Training that is useful until we are able to operate on that granularity of perception without formalized symbols? If so, measurement may only be valid for areas where we as organisms seem to lack skill and declare a willingness to be more skillful? Maybe even in areas like gratitude, multi-perspectival ability or joint decision making. Even though all those areas might feel too tender for deliberate currency design?

      Great perspective on measurement.

  3. Sep 2019
  4. Jul 2019
  5. May 2019
  6. Apr 2019
    1. When Wojcicki took over, in 2014, YouTube was a third of the way to the goal, she recalled in investor John Doerr’s 2018 book Measure What Matters.“They thought it would break the internet! But it seemed to me that such a clear and measurable objective would energize people, and I cheered them on,” Wojcicki told Doerr. “The billion hours of daily watch time gave our tech people a North Star.” By October, 2016, YouTube hit its goal.

      Obviously they took the easy route. You may need to measure what matters, but getting to that goal by any means necessary or using indefensible shortcuts is the fallacy here. They could have had that North Star, but it's the means they used by which to reach it that were wrong.

      This is another great example of tech ignoring basic ethics to get to a monetary goal. (Another good one is Marc Zuckerberg's "connecting people" mantra when what he should be is "connecting people for good" or "creating positive connections".

  7. Feb 2019
    1. In such a future working relationship between human problem-solver and computer 'clerk,' the capability of the computer for executing mathematical processes would be used whenever it was needed. However, the computer has many other capabilities for manipulating and displaying information that can be of significant benefit to the human in nonmathematical processes of planning, organizing, studying, etc.
  8. Dec 2018
  9. Oct 2017
    1. The SNA approach allowed for more nuance in understanding the relationships than other analyses would have.

      Did they look at any outcomes of the different circuits? For example, did Circuit C have more successful prosecutions? Or less re victimization? Any way of measuring whether one network was better than another?

  10. Jul 2017
    1. there are two different measurements for the length of a foot in the United States: the International Foot (also commonly called the foot) and the U.S. Survey Foot. The International Foot (which we were all taught in school) is defined as 0.3048 meters, whereas the U.S. Survey Foot is defined as 0.3048006096 meters. The difference of the two equates to 2 parts per million.

      For example, in a measurement of 10,000 feet, the difference would be 0.02 feet (just less than one-quarter of an inch). In a measurement of 1 million feet, the difference is 2 feet.

  11. Jan 2017
  12. May 2016
  13. Apr 2016
  14. Aug 2015
  15. afghanag.ucdavis.edu afghanag.ucdavis.edu
    1. jerib

      A jerib or djerib is a unit of land measure. While some countries have standardized this to a hectare, in most countries this unit of measure varies locally. It can be a few acres or hundreds of meters square.