22 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2020
    1. "We really want to see what everyone wants to say.… When you have a lot of people passionate about hockey, and not about religion, it's interesting to see people's reactions to the question," she said. "If they can make connections between religion and sport,

      Very interesting to see the connection here between hockey and religion. Because religion is a rocky subject in the surrounding area because of the oppressive history it has on the people. Are they saying that hockey has some sort of bondage over the people or were they just being funny?

    1. Montreal was aghast. Campbell's rulingwas considered an act not of justice but of vindictiveness, theEnglish-speaking boss thwarting the aspirations of theFrench-speaking populist hero. Richard had led the Canadiens tothree Stanley Cups and had scored 50 goals in 50 games, but hehad never won a scoring title and was on the brink of his first.With teammate Bernie Geoffrion three points behind him, it wasapparent that Richard wouldn't win it this year, either.

      That is so frustrating. Suspend him for his last three games? So petty. Could have just fined him if he was going to make a statement like that.

    1. Maurice Richard­-le Rocket, Montreal’s homegrown French-Canadian star from the city’s blue-collar Nouveau-Bordeaux neighborhood, the world’s greatest hockey player to that time — carries the puck in the Boston zone. Hal Laycoe steps in his way. The 12,023 fans brace themselves.

      WORLDS greatest?? Oh wow

    1. Since then, larger thinkers on the Quebec scene have argued whether this was the beginning of Quebec's Quiet Revolution — officially pegged for 1960 with the election of Jean Lesage as Premier — or perhaps just the end of a time when hockey was more important than politics, as the latter began to take hold among French Canadian youth.

      I definitely believe this was the beginning of the Quiet Revolution. It was definitely the incident that tipped the scale! At the time, Quebec was already a powder keg because of the great fight for the french language and against the overpowering of the Catholic church.

    1. "Up there the winters are harder yet than here, and still longer. We have only dogs to draw our sleds, fine strong dogs, but bad-tempered and often half wild, and we feed them but once a day, in the evening, on frozen fish.... Yes, there are settlements, but almost no farming; the men live by trapping and fishing ... No, I never had any difficulty with the Indians; I always got on very well with them. I know nearly all those on the Mistassini and this river, for they used to come to our place before my father died. You see he often went trapping in winter when he was not in the shanties, and one season when he was at the head of the Riviere aux Foins, quite alone, a tree that he was cutting for firewood slipped in falling, and it was the Indians who found him by chance next day, crushed and half-frozen though the weather was mild. He was in their game preserve, and they might very well have pretended not to see him and have left him to die there; but they put him on their toboggan, brought him to their camp, and looked after him. You knew my father: a rough man who often took a glass, but just in his dealings, and with a good name for doing that sort of thing himself. So when he parted with these Indians he told them to stop and see him in the spring when they would be coming down to Pointe Bleue with their furs-François Paradis of Mistassini,' said he to them, will not forget what you have done ... François Paradis.' And when they came in spring while running the river he looked after them well and every one carried away a new ax, a fine woollen blanket and tobacco for six months. Always after that they used to pay us a visit in the spring, and father had the pick of their best skins for less than the companies' buyers had to pay. When he died they treated me in the same way be cause I was his son and bore the same name, François Paradis. With more capital I could have made a good bit of money in this trade-a good bit of money."

      In by "skins" is he referring to animal skins? Their only source of transportation was dog drawn sleds? What kind of dogs were these to endure such winters? Amazing how the natives were treated so poorly by colonizers and how nicely the natives care for them when they see them struggling even after how they have been treated

  2. Jul 2020
  3. Jan 2020
  4. Apr 2019
  5. Aug 2018
    1. Largest census metropolitan areas in Canada by population (2016 Census) viewtalkedit CMA Province Population CMA Province Population Toronto Ontario 5,928,040 London Ontario 494,069 Montreal Quebec 4,098,927 St. Catharines–Niagara Ontario 406,074 Vancouver British Columbia 2,463,431 Halifax Nova Scotia 403,390 Calgary Alberta 1,392,609

      4098927

    1. MontrealToronto Improve Data Improve Data Air Pollution Low 28.32 Low 33.55 Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility Very Low 16.03 Very Low 18.92 Dissatisfaction with Garbage Disposal Low 23.64 Low 28.55 Dirty and Untidy Low 32.88 Low 35.83 Noise and Light Pollution Moderate 49.73 Moderate 44.97 Water Pollution Low 36.36

      36.36

    2. Very High 82.88 High 71.96

      82.88

    1. 32,120,519Internet Users in Canada (2016*)Share of Canada Population: 88.5 % (penetration)Total Population : 36,286,378 Share of World Internet Users: 0.9 %Internet Users in the World: 3,424,971,237

      87

    1. Score 82 / 100 i A country or territory’s score indicates the perceived level of public sector corruption on a scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean). Learn more.

      82

  6. Dec 2016
    1. Montreal Neurological Institute

      sharing all data associated with its research; no patents for 5 yrs (see video) - first major research institute of it's kind - check if this is really true?