3,061 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
  2. Aug 2019
    1. I think that listening to someone such as a teacher can help develop oral language skills because you are listening to someone with far more developed oral language and learning proper ways of saying/phrasing etc. things you may not already know.

    2. This is important to know going into teaching children these things.

    3. I believe that this is very important to teach children because it can completely change the meaning of what is being said.

    4. I think it is easy to see when children get better with the word order. For example, I remember when my cousin would say "dog big" and now can change that to "its a big dog"

    5. I started learning sign language so I think its interesting that these things are a way of using prosodic features.

  3. languagedev.wikispaces.com languagedev.wikispaces.com
    1. Children who ore in environments where oral language and written languug are used in monningful ways will gradually acquire competencies in using language t communicate and to solve problems.

      how do we facilitate this as educators?

    2. Laban's

      kids who are in a kindergarten program that provides good language input have better later vocabularies, more complex sentences, higher reading and writing competencies

    3. Listening is not a passive activity. Instead, to be effective, lis-tening must be active ancl purposeful.

      listening should be active and listener should be engaged

    4. ho metalinguistic level

      awareness of specific features and aspects within language

    5. Children who have had frequent storybook internet ions wilh a wide variety of types of texts (or genres) will develop an aware· ness of how language is used in oach type of discourse

      importance of reading to kids so that they are exposed to more than just one type of language input

    6. Pmgmnlic knowledge involves the .. kno~g~ ,?£~~~re~s~a\~t of_the communication and how language is used to achieve that intent. Pragmatic

      pragmatic knowledge: knowing how to use language to achieve something

    7. A.s...~ecome more aware of how mor-phemes are t~ed, their lang~e beco~~~r;ecisem@ me.g1.1.9gffiL_

      the more kids understand morphemes=better and more precise language

    8. meaningful phrases.

      syntactic knowledge=being able to create meaningful sentences/phrases

    9. that organize our conceptual knowledge. These semantic networks facilitate nffw learni

      schemata-helps us organize conceptual knowledge

    10. Prosodic fealures in a languago represent the wa)~sometl1h.!_g is said

      intonation/ inflection involved here

    11. honological knowledge refers to knowledge about sound-symbol relations in a language. A phoneme is the smallest linguistic unit of sound, which is combined with other phonemes lo form words. Phonemes consist of sounds that are considered to be a single perceptual unit by a listener, such as th

      phonological knowledge= different from phonetics.

    12. It forms the foundation of our perceptions, com-municntion!f and daily interactions.

      Interesting question: does language shape reality or does reality shape language?

    13. attention to lan8!!Q.@_ a~municg_li9Il..!J!!.J1er than a fo_cus on spi3_e.ch_pro_ctu<1tion ~nd..th~_.de.v.elopment of articulation. This approach recognizes that language is a medium of communi-cation with ot

      this is important, and I relate this to my studies as a linguistics minor: language/studying language is not necessarily about speaking correctly, but in how we communicate naturally

    1. On a worldwide scale, illiteracy disproportionately impacts women.[32] According to 2015 UIS data collected by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, about two-thirds (63%) of the world's illiterate adults are women. This disparity was even starker in previous decades: from 1970 to 2000, the global gender gap in literacy would decrease by roughly 50%.[33] In recent years, however, this progress has stagnated, with the remaining gender gap holding almost constant over the last two decades.[28] In general, the gender gap in literacy is not as pronounced as the regional gap; that is, differences between countries in overall literacy are often larger than gender differences within countries.[34] However, the gap between men and women would narrow from 1990 onwards, after the increase of male adult literacy rates at 80 per cent (see image)

      I think literacy overall is important because of situations like these in which there are huge gaps between the genders and regions.

    2. "Literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society".

      One must understand that in order to remain "literate" in any potential knowledge or skill one must continue to sharpen their knowledge or skill by researching and or applying that potential knowledge or skill into their daily life and communities.

    3. verall literacy are often larger than gender differences within countries.[34] However, the gap between men and women would narrow from 1990 onwards, after the increase of male adult literacy rates at 80 per cent (see image).[27]

      literacy can be used as a motivating factor

    4. literacy

      Literacy helps us to understand and to communicate in a more thoughtful and deeper way. In today's world, as we seem more divided, literacy opens our perspective to a broader experience and allows us to connect with ohers around us.

    5. "The written word was all around them, in both public and private life: laws, calendars, regulations at shrines, and funeral epitaphs were engraved in stone or bronze. The Republic amassed huge archives of reports on every aspect of public life"

      even in ancient times literacy was being utilized. not necessarily in the traditional sense of the word that we always think of, but literacy was found in private and public life. interesting way of thinking about literacy

    6. The key to literacy is reading development, a progression of skills which begins with the ability to understand spoken words and decode written words, and which culminates in the deep understanding of text.

      This can happen across a variety of different platforms. Being literate includes an understand of technology.

    7. an important role in literacy development, gains in childhood literacy often occur in primary school settings. Continuing the global expansion of public education is thus a frequent focus of literacy advocates.

      Literacy seems to be strongly embedded in the education of an individual. Education being a way of achieving growth in reading and writing ability, speech, and listening skills.

    8. eaching people to read and write, in a traditional sense of the meaning (literacy) is a very complex task in a native language. To do this in a second language becomes increasingly more complex, and in the case of migrants relocating to another country there can be legal and policy driven boundaries that prohibit the naturalization and acquisition of citizen ship based on language proficiency.

      Literacy to me is being able to clearly communicate with the social, cultural, and political activities in society and feel a part of the community and group.

    9. While women and girls comprise the majority of the global illiterate population, in many developed countries a literacy gender gap exists in the opposite direction.

      This is so important to think about while teaching. If you have a student that is natively from a country that may not educate women as much as men, you will have to face the issue of bringing that student up to par with some of your other students.

    10. Literacy to me is not just the ability of learning to read but also the importance of how to properly analyze and understand a piece of text.

    11. "Literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society".[7]

      I believe literacy is the ability to understand, speak, communicate, etc. but also the continuous learning and practicing. It is important to be literate in almost all real-life situations and it would be impossible to fulfill your potential if you were illiterate. It gives us opportunities to connect and further educate ourselves to be successful.

    12. The public library has long been a force promoting literacy in many countries.[70] In the U.S. context, the American Library Association promotes literacy through the work of the Office for Literacy and Outreach Services.

      I'm reading Bombay London New York right now and in the novel, the author Kumar discusses these very ideas surrounding literary and its connections to public library spaces. Libraries and other ways of accessing text are fundamental in developing one's literacy. This is even more prudent today.

    13. Egyptian hieroglyphs emerged from 3300-3100 BCE and depicted royal iconography that emphasized power amongst other elites. The Egyptian hieroglyphic writing system was the first notation system to have phonetic values.

      Very interesting, 1st recorded use of phonics in relation to literacy.

    14. "Literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society".

      I agree that Literacy enables an individual's motivation to achieve their goals and to further take control of their own knowledge and potentials while also making them more aware of what is going on around them.

    15. defining literacy as the "ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate and compute, using printed and written materials associated with varying contexts".
    16. Reading development involves a range of complex language-underpinnings including awareness of speech sounds (phonology), spelling patterns (orthography), word meaning (semantics), grammar (syntax) and patterns of word formation (morphology), all of which provide a necessary platform for reading fluency and comprehension.

      So many parts come together to form literacy. I am able to see here that it is not just reading and writing but also the way we speak, the meaning of the words, and more.

    17. Reading development involves a range of complex language-underpinnings including awareness of speech sounds (phonology), spelling patterns (orthography), word meaning (semantics), grammar (syntax) and patterns of word formation (morphology), all of which provide a necessary platform for reading fluency and comprehension.

      When thinking of literacy many people are just thinking of reading and being able to understand language. But there is so much more to being literate in a language.

    18. The modern term's meaning has been expanded[by whom?] to include the ability to use language, numbers, images, computers, and other basic means to understand, communicate, gain useful knowledge, solve mathematical problems and use the dominant symbol systems of a culture.

      this is important because it shows how much literacy has grown over time and what 'literacy' means in todays society.

    19. iteracy, which includes the abilities to apply to printed material critical analysis, inference and synthesis;

      How can this encompass digital literacy and non-printed texts; how does being literate change as the world of tech is constantly changing?

    20. The modern term's meaning has been expanded[by whom?] to include the ability to use language, numbers, images, computers, and other basic means to understand, communicate, gain useful knowledge, solve mathematical problems and use the dominant symbol systems of a culture

      This quote defines literacy in a great way, since it shows that literacy can apply to so many different things, not just words.

    21. The key to literacy is reading development, a progression of skills which begins with the ability to understand spoken words and decode written words, and which culminates in the deep understanding of text.

      This is a focus on text in literacy.

    1. To achieve this goal, a synthesis of theoretical perspectives and research into a new instructional model known as online content construction (OCC) is necessary. OCC is defined as the skills, strategies and dispositions necessary as students construct, redesign, or reinvent online texts by actively encoding and decoding meaning through the use of digital texts and tools

      Here is the definition of OCC. It is absolutely necessary to teach students to encode and decode online text because this is the way we communicate today. However, teachers need to be taught as well.

    1. The ‘Why’ of MultiliteraciesFirst, why literacy? Or even more fundamentally, why education (in which literacy is a ‘basic’)? On this front, not much has changed in ten years. The two sides of the political spectrum, characterised loosely as ‘left’ and ‘right’, remain poles apart in what they see as the appropriate role of literacy learning in society, and indeed, education in general.

      Well, I think there is a lot has changed since this article (2009) and the question is not "Why?" anymore. The real hard question is "How"? How are we going to keep up with the speed of changing technology and new digital literacies? How can we make sure that every child gets the opportunity to spend ample time on the computer, creating, building, constructing and not only consuming? How can we scaffold teachers so they are skilled and capable of using new digital literacies?

    2. As I was reading this article, knowing that it's 10 years old, I was constantly trying to think back to 2009 and see how different education became since then. For us, today, the change is not enough and reforms take forever to get through the system. However, the speed of change has never been higher! So, for us, teachers, it has never been a more exciting time to face forward and see what's ahead, and participate in the Change. But we need to buckle up!

    3. Education is one of the key sources of social equity.

      Yes! And this is why education cannot be "sold" and cannot be handled as a business. If we let money dictate the ways of education, it will hardly ever lead to social equity.

    4. The world was changing, the communications environment was changing, and it seemed to us to follow that literacy teaching and learning would to have to change, as well.

      Since this article (2009) the way of learning has changed tremendously but it is changing now even faster! In 2009 few school were able to afford to give laptops or Chromebooks to each student in a class. Now, it is not uncommon at all to have it in your lesson plan that you're going to have the students work on their computers.

    5. Even the idea of a ‘Google search’ was unimaginable ten years ago.

      ... and this article is from 2009!!! So, a Google search was unimaginable 20 years ago.

    1. I believe that the word choice involved in identifying construction as opposed to creation is also of the utmost importance. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product

      This is a great description of the difference between creation and construction of an online content.

    2. to try and consolidate the great work in visual, digital, and multimodal content construction…while making it easy & flexible enough for teachers to make this work happen in their classrooms.

      I also think that this is really important in theory. Not all schools will have access to these sort of things and if they do not, where do you go from there?

    3. The ideas and concepts in all of this work does overlap sometimes…and students and teachers should feel empowered to move in, out, and between all of the concepts. Working online is a fluid experience which calls for flexible learners.

      I think a lot of teaching is overlapping. You continue to review no matter the material.

    4. ORC) has elements of “communication” identified as the last of the five skills students need.

      Communication is what I feel is really important. You are trying to get your point across and this is one of the most important steps.

    5. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      This is kind of like the students scaffolding their own work to make sure they have a solid foundation to end up with a solid finished product.

      This is also really great practice for the real world. As an instructional designer and project manager I have experienced that if your work is constructed in stages and you make sure each stage is solid before moving on to the next, you can really only have to tweak as you go along and not reinvent.

    1. Gee (2007: 172) describes deep learning as “learning that can lead to real understanding, the ability to apply one’s knowledge, and even to transform that knowledge for innovation.” He argues that pursuing deep learning requires moving beyond learning about – “what the facts are, where they came from, and who believes them” – to learning to be – which involves “design” in the sense of understanding how and when and why knowledge of various kinds is useful for and sufficient for achieving particular purposes and goals. According to Gee (2007: 172)

      This is a great paragraph about deep learning. Not just learning about but "learning to be" which involves design.

    2. Genus Species + Species Hybrids Example

      Great examples of remixes in the real world

    3. •Photoshopping remixes (e.g., Lostfrog.org)•Music and music video remixes (e.g., Danger Mouse’s “Grey Album” and the Grey video)•Machinima remixes (e.g., Machinima.com)•Moving image remixes (e.g., Animemusicvideos.org)•Original manga and anime fan art (e.g., DeviantArt.com)•Television, movie, book remixes (e.g., Fanfiction.net)•Serviceware mashups (e.g., Twittervision.com)

      Great resources.

    4. Lessig (2005) provides a range of examples of the kinds of digital remix practices that in his view constitute “the more interesting ways [to write]” for young people. These include remixing clips from movies to create “faux” trailers for hypothetical movies; setting remixed movie trailers to remixed music of choice that is synchronized to the visual action; recording a series of anime cartoons and then video-editing them in synchrony with a popular music track; mixing “found” images with original images in order to express a theme or idea (with or without text added); and mixing images, animations and texts to create cartoons or satirical posters (including political cartoons and animations), to name just a few types. We accept this conceptual extension of “writing” to include practices of producing, exchanging and negotiating digitally remixed texts, which may employ a single medium or may be multimedia remixes. (We also recognize as forms of remix various practices that do not necessarily involve digitally remixing sound, image and animation, such as paper-based forms of fanfiction writing and fan-producing manga art and comics, which continue to go on alongside their hugely subscribed digital variants.

      There are all very good examples. The great thing is, that as a language teacher there are so many different types of media that the students can really hone in on their interests.

    5. “Machinima” – machine + cinema – is the term used to describe the process by which fans use video game animation “engines” to create movies.

      Creating machinima involves telling a story using tools found within the game engine. The resulting clips or “takes” are spliced together using movie editing software (e.g., iMovie, Sony Vegas). machinima.com

    6. where someone creates a cultural product by mixing meaningful elements together (e.g., ideas from different people with ideas of one’s own), and then someone else comes along and remixes this cultural artefact with others to create yet another artefact.

      I think this could be fun to with students in Spanish. I can introduce music, poems, art and have students remix them.

    7. Then for ‘Before We Were Men’, I tried my hardest to make this video stand out above all the other Naruto V. Sasuke AMVs that are out there. I wanted to show all the things that the two had gone through up to the fight that they have near the end of the series. Also I tried to throw in a bit of fan service with the text [i.e., words like “passion”, “angst” appearing at specific points in the video] and the ending along with keeping the theme of the Video feed effect at the beginning and end [i.e., quiet introductory and conclusion sequences].

      DynamiteBeakdown is a 17-year-old student who spends much of his spare time working on AMV, with some of his projects requiring months of time and hundreds of anime clips to complete.

    8. But if you think about the ways kids under 15 using digital technology think about writing – you know, writing with text is just one way to write, and not even the most interesting way to write. The more interesting ways are increasingly to use images and sound and video to express ideas (in Koman 2005: n.p.)

      It is fascinating to the mind and this is why I can get caught up "playing around" with technology for hours but it's not satisfying to the soul. The endless possibilities of seeing, watching, reading, and remixing are captivating, and it makes me feel like I'm doing something, but at the end, did I really create anything? It's possible, but I have to remind myself of what I'm really doing online.

    9. associated with activism contesting copyright and intellectual property legislation

      This is so important and such a hot topic issue!!!

    10. . Until recently this concept was associated almost entirely with recorded music. It referred to using audio editing techniques to produce “an alternative mix of a recorded song that differed from the original, and involved taking apart the various instruments and components that make up a recording and remixing them into something that sounds completely different” (ethnomus.ucr.edu/remix_culture/remix_history.htm).

      Yes, we always had this in music. Way before digital technology, even in the Renaissance, composers used each others' themes and pieces and rearranged ("re-made") them.

    11. By “remix” we mean the practice of taking cultural artefacts and combining and manipulating them into a new kind of creative blend.

      This is a new way of being creative and it's cool and it's fun, but will never be able to reach the depth of an original work that comes from one person's desire to express something that is uniquely theirs yet, at the same time, communicates something universal to what, for some mysterious reasons, we can all relate! (See Michelangelo, or Shakespeare, for example.) But, only time can tell whether I'm right or wrong. We should come back and see 300 years from now :-)

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zd-dqUuvLk4 1:30-4:10 We can apply these ideas to technology. You don't have to reinvent the wheel each time you want to introduce a new technology or program into the classroom!

    2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkAietIUKVU Watch how this young man takes his creativity to the next level! He could teach us all something about creativity and how we think of others' perception of our creations.

    3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuV7zcXigAI

      Watch 4:10-5:30. Very helpful and applicable to the classroom and how the multi-generational age gap plays a role in common misconceptions.

    1. is a remix | Kirby Ferguson

      Great video to share with students. It kind of gives them the confidence that when a task it put in front of us, we don't have to reinvent the wheel necessarily just make it better or add to it.

    1. Video Games (Is School Enough? Series)

      I love the idea for my students coding and creating games. I bought a robot to start getting students to code and start engaging in other ideas.

      I love the view the student has on feedback. Knowing what constructive criticism is really helpful is great growth-mindset. Using peers to give constructive criticism is a great way to help students out.

    2. (Is School Enough? Series)

      Giving feedback is vital and may be more valuable than just a teachers feedback.

    3. (Is School Enough? Series)

      Young boy is able to make his own video games. This is part of participatory culture.

    1. Cultural Anthropologist Mimi Ito on Connected Learning, Children, and Digital Media

      This is a great question and a great start. I think teachers want o do this but do not know how or where to start. The question has been posed and I am sure little by little we will figure out how to do it.

    2. Mimi

      Parents often view their children as wasting time on their phones or tablets but it was how their parents felt when they were on the house phone talking with friends or would not come inside to do homework when they were out with friends. The only difference is how the children are interacting with their friends.

    3. Digital Media

      2 Types of participation

    1. Contemporary text is about design and principles of composition. Relation between social environment and representation. More images, less writing and writing and image are combined.

    2. Page 176 It is interesting that it bings up the opera as probably the only example before "screen" opportunities where modal ensembles were available for many people offering possibilities of representation that had not existed before. Today modal ensembles are available for anyone and everyone.

    3. A mode is making meaning. Modes can be used to do different kinds of semiotic work. Transduction describes changes involving a change in mode, transformation described changes in arrangement within one mode.

    4. This new media allows for the students to really bring their projects and presentations to live to really match their personalities

    1. D

      Harry Potter Alliance is a group formed from social media by participatory culture. This group now does service around the world to aid in natural disasters, and aid in various civil rights violations.

    2. nkins - 03

      Participatory culture does not have the purpose to make money rather to share information and ideas.

    3. 10He

      Participatory Culture began in the middle 19th century

    4. 06

      What the students did after school was what they actually cared about.

    5. 316 I like this 2 I dislike this Share Share Save

      Mobilize the skills they have acquired and gear that towards a community to promote change.

    6. Henry Jenkins on Participatory Culture

      Students start their passons from "geeking out"

    7. (Big Thinkers Series)

      Participatory culture= a culture where everyone participates.

    8. (Big Thinkers Series)

      Students had a richer creative and intellectual experience out of school.

    1. TEDxNYED - Henry Jenkins - 03/06/10

      Henry Jenkins speaks/leads another Ted Talk.

  4. Jul 2019
    1. how do we create a literacy pedagogy which promotes a culture of flexibility, creativity, innovation and initiative?

      A great brainstorming question, which we are still figuring out, but is very importance in a learning environment.

    2. 3literacy curriculum taught to a singular standard (grammar, the literary canon, standard national forms of the language), the everyday experience of meaning making was increasingly one of negotiating discourse differences. A pedagogy of Multiliteracies would need to address this as a fundamental aspect of contemporary teaching and learning.

      Curriculum changes alongside technological advancements lead to a need for change.

    3. The world was changing, the communications environment was changing, and it seemed to us to follow that literacy teaching and learning would to have to change, as well.

      A change of standards and way of doing things was modified as the world changed and developed

    1. the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initia-tive (2012) establishes more uniform standards across states to prepare students for college and careers in the 21st century. One of the key design principles in the CCSS, research and media skills, focuses on the integra-tion of online research and comprehension skills within the classroom such as locating, evaluating, synthesizing, and communicating

      4 key online skills are integrated in Common Core (2012): locating, evaluating, synthesizing and communicating.

    2. LanSchool,

      It is interesting to see these programs in action. Students are amazed at the skills of their peers! It gives students a confidence boost in themselves and their classmates!

    3. However, this does not nec-essarily mean they are skilled in the effective use of online information, perhaps the most important aspect of the Internet. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008

      I completely agree with this. They can use the internet but they lack the skills to sift through information in a timely manner that does not make them give up in 10 seconds.

    4. One might even suggest that, over a lifetime, learning how to learn New Literacies is more important than learning a specific literacy of reading or writing.

      This is learning how to learn. When we learn how to learn we can figure out new technologies and we can problem solve

    5. In addition, it means learning from other colleagues, an important source of information in a world where it is hard for any one person to keep up with all of the changes that are taking place.

      For this, I love even Facebook! I am connected to choir director and music teach groups from many parts of the world and I can hear pieces that I would never hear without global connectedness and I get new ideas and choral techniques and hear about problems and struggles that are similar to mine.

    6. read as “healthy skeptics.”

      Teach them to read as healthy skeptics!

    7. To keep up to date with those that are added to Google, visit Google’s “Inside Search” at www.google.com/insidesearch/searcheduca-tion/index.html.

      "Inside Search"

    8. to help the last become first with New Literacies

      this is a wonderful goal!

    9. Imagine a first or fifth grader who has been struggling with literacy learning suddenly becoming the class expert on how to cre-ate a new blog comment or post. A few minutes of coaching on the neces-sary steps puts this student in the expert seat. The rest of the class then relies on this student for instruction and coaching. This student’s role in the classroom shifts as he or she shares responsibility for teaching impor-tant reading and writing skills.

      What a great way to empower a struggling student and open up new doors for them to feel skilled, helpful and in charge of something they're good at!

    10. by teaching struggling readers the New Literacies required by your student e-mail system and then have them teach their newly acquired e-mail skills to other students

      it makes sense!

    11. that require additional skills and strategies. Most importantly, it is reshap-ing the nature of literacy education, providing us with many new and exciting opportunities for our classrooms.We live during a time in which new technologies continuously appear online, requiring additional skills to effectively read, write, and learn, sometimes on a daily basis. Consider, for example, just a few of these new technologies: Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Siri, Foursquare, Drop-box, Skype, Chrome, iMovie, Contribute, or any of many, many mobile

      this section is unreadable because of being over-highlighted - technologies' new problems and I don't have a solution :-(

    12. Second, the ability to read and use online information effectively to solve problems defines success in both life and work

      this relates back to my other post about how they can use these skills forever

    13. First, they focus directly on information use and learning, so these skills are central to education at all levels.

      this is a really good thing for students to learn at a young age because they will use it in many different ways for life

    1. Learning

      Notes: -bringing play into education "messing around"/"geeking out"-interest driven orientation. developing sophisticated tech/media literacy

      • learning opportunities in both friend space and geek space
    1. "when school day is over"-curious learning is done Participatory Culture -communities producing media to share among themselves -people produce media to share with each other, not for money -passing of skills -social mode of production -drive to share for sharing's sake -Harry POtter Alliance -participatory culture and changing the world -bringing PC into educational culture -Wikipedia example

    1. A variety of educational taxonomies have been adopted by districts and states nationwide. Examples of widely used taxonomies include but are not limited to Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives;23 [ 23] Bloom’s revised Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing;24 [ 24] Marzano and Kendell’s New Taxonomy of Educational Objectives;25 [ 25] and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Levels.26 [ 26] Using educational taxonomies to facilitate the development and guide the organization of learning objectives can improve content appropriateness, assessment effectiveness, and efficiency in learning and teaching.

      Bloom's Taxonomy

    2. Choice of strategies is closely linked to actual, perceived needs as the rehearsal unfolds.”10 [ 10]

      This is very important to understand! Any rehearsal in music can and should be pre-planned with as much details as possible, but it will always have to be flexible, according to the needs of those problems that occur during the rehearsal. It's a constant doing, listening, evaluating, correcting, doing it again ... Music itself is a Teacher!

    3. How you track student progress can make a difference in their learning and your teaching.

      I will have to develop my own assessment strategies - formative and summative.

    1. Performance assessment does not have to be a time-consuming ordeal; it is a great way to assess our students' skills. It is essential to create a rubric that is simple, quick, and objective. This article discusses the process of creating a rubric as well as showing a rubric used by the author in her general music classroom for several years. Differences between assessment and evaluation are also mentioned.

      How to create a rubric for performance assessment?

    1. FIGURE 5 Self-Assessment Analytic Qualitative RubricDirections: Answer each question by circling the most accurate answer.1. I try to watch the music and the director at the same time. I can do this by sitting upright and holding my music at chest height.Always Frequently Sometimes Never2. I try to use good breath support while I am singing.Always Frequently Sometimes Never3. I try to sing with a full and free vocal tone, while blending my voice with others.Always Frequently Sometimes Never4. When I get ready to sing a song or exercise, I look at the key signature to determine the key (also called the "tonality").Always Frequently Sometimes Never5. I try to read notes and rhythms as I am singing.Always Frequently Sometimes Never

      This is a great example of self-assessment in choir

    1. It is interesting to notice that this article from a decade ago doesn't even mention any online assessment. So much has changed since then! I'm glad to see that from measuring attendance and attitude we are moving toward a more professionally acceptable system where we can teach, assign and assess measurable knowledge in music ed, more specifically in choral programs.

    2. 11% for music knowledge

      Only 11% for knowledge! That is surprising and could be more if we don't try to measure "talent" but the knowledge that is teachable and factual. Again, this is old data (1991) so today the numbers might look different.

    3. Moreover, non-achievement criteria such as attendance, attitude, effort, and participation may be given more overall weight in the grading process than achievement criteria.

      Yes. I agree. And these are the characteristics of our Online Reading Comprehension module as well. It is not the grade. It is not the achievement, but the process, the participation and engagement.

    4. attendance and attitude were the most common grading criteria employed by instrumental and choral music teachers.

      Yes. I noticed that in schools.

    5. Some music teachers believe the creative or interpretive nature of music precludes assessment but then readily employ subjective methods of assessment, many of which "are determined haphazardly, ritualistically, and/or with disregard for available objective information" (Boyle & Radocy, 1987, p. 2).

      This is old data (1987) but still true on some levels. By now, what I see in practice is that music educators have figured out what is that's measurable and what is not and in the school I was student teaching, the choral program is taken as an academic subject and is graded.

    1. Because blog entries are published on websites, they can easily incorporate photography, infographics, and embedded video. This is a great way to scaffold all elements of digital literacy, as student assignments become increasingly complex and build digital literacy skills over the course of the school year.

      this is good for students to use because it allows them to create things that they have fun doing while learning still

    1. Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure.

      building blocks to creating the end product

    2. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      content construction

    3. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.

      content creation

    4. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      differences between online construction (building, framework) and creation (bringing into existence)

    5. . She identified that in order to “identify, in textual terms, how the Internet mediates the representation of knowledge, the framing of entertainment, and the conduct of communication”, our understanding of construction and creation needs to be broad enough to allow for change in the future. I believe that viewing the work as construction and more expansive that just creation allows for this eventuality.

      OCC and allowing content to be able to change and evolve in the future

    6. Working online is a fluid experience which calls for flexible learners.

      good to remember when wanting everything to look, be, etc. a certain way online..it is a process!

    1. Internet Reciprocal Teaching Promotes the Five CsCreativity: Students use divergent-thinking skills to generate their own questions and keywords for online searches. Their final projects require them to creatively express their own point of view. Communication: Students share what they learn as they work in small groups and with the whole class. They communicate with a wider audience by posting on a class blog. Collaboration: Students create collaborative knowledge through Internet inquiry and social interactions. They comment on one another's work using technologies such as VoiceThread and support one another through instant messaging. Critical Thinking: When using the Internet, students build the text they read, choosing which links to follow and which to ignore. The nonlinear nature of online reading helps support critical thinking. Students also learn to question the perspective and bias of online sources. Comprehension: Students learn important online reading skills, such as how to distinguish news articles from blog posts and editorials. They carefully read texts they encounter online to understand and evaluate different perspectives.

      5 Cs

    2. As the tide shifts from page to screen, students must learn to comprehend evolving texts.

      summary

    3. Internet inquiry offered students the opportunity to explore authentic issues while building online reading comprehension skills.

      The benefits of using Internet Inquiry are exploring real-life problems and improving online reading comprehension skills at the same time.

    4. Although we were impressed with how well the students used the skills and strategies from the first two phases to conduct their research, the most rewarding aspect of Phase 3 was the sense of agency that students expressed.

      the most rewarding aspect ... the sense of agency!

    5. How do I make the world a better place?

      Phase 3 question

    6. This project differs from the traditional research project in that the focus is on the process of inquiry and not the product of research. Students develop an understanding of how important it is for them to play an active role in their own learning and experience the satisfaction associated with knowing how to question, locate, evaluate, synthesize, and communicate information.

      process vs. product (result) Internet Reciprocal Teaching Phase 3: Student-Centered Learning

    7. Students worked in small groups to find five to seven articles about the attack. We discussed the differences among news articles, blogs, and editorials. Then the students had to post comments on the classroom blog about whether they thought the zoo or the patron was at fault for the attack.In a follow-up activity, student groups had to decide whether zoos were cruel or a tool for learning. First, they had to find five Web sites that criticized zoos and five that supported zoos. Each group posted links to a classroom blog. Then the groups had to choose three Web sites for each position from the class list and rank these sites on continuums of usefulness and truthfulness.

      I could use this process in my project.

    8. we asked them to find out whether any famous people were foster children.

      Great idea. Maybe I can ask my students to search for famous composers, conductors or/and performers who were foster children (orphans).

    9. No one gave students a map for Internet inquiry. Students needed a sextant, a tool for navigation, to guide them.

      So true! I often feel the same way. I'm expected to do things that I've never learned and use tools that I'm not familiar with. On one hand, this is part of life and it is great if at one point in our life we learn to put aside our discomfort, feel comfortable or even excited to "step out of our comfort zone", but on the other hand, if we are giving out assignments, it is important to be aware of where our students are, what they know and what tools they capable of using.

    10. students work both individually and in small groups at using strategies and skills from the previous phases to develop lines of inquiry around curricular topics.

      Definition of Phase 3.

    11. Another technique is to create Internet scavenger hunts connected to the curriculum. On completing the challenge, students share their searching strategies with the class.

      I really like this idea!

    12. Communication: Students share what they learn as they work in small groups and with the whole class. They communicate with a wider audience by posting on a class blog.

      I love the idea of communication between peers. This is key to scaffolding and socialization skills.

    13. Creativity: Students use divergent-thinking skills to generate their own questions and keywords for online searches. Their final projects require them to creatively express their own point of view.

      By allowing students to generate their own questions and ideas, students will work harder to find answers for them. It sparks personal interest within the classroom setting.

    14. Internet inquiry offered students the opportunity to explore authentic issues while building online reading comprehension skills.

      It is amazing to see students taking on social issues based off of what they have learned within the classroom.

    15. These Cs include such skills as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension.

      Teachers often teach as if students already know these skills. However, it is my experience that students struggle with these skills more than any others.

    16. Phase 2 is a collaborative phase during which both teachers and students conduct think-aloud demonstrations and minilessons.

      Phase 2

    17. Phase 1 centers on computer basics, word processing skills, Web searching, navigation basics, and e-mail.

      Phase 1

    18. We hope teachers can use these examples to develop their own ideas. Ideally, teachers will integrate the approach into units that they are already doing. This method ensures that students continue to develop traditional skills alongside the new skills of online reading comprehension.

      This statement makes a good point. If a teacher or anyone for that matter is told to change their ways completely, they wont and will rebel. If the steps are taken to gradually increase in transition is will me smooth.

    19. Reciprocal teaching revolves around four global comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing. The teacher explains these strategies to small groups using a shared text, first modeling their use, and then asking students to lead the groups.

      Definition of Reciprocal Teaching

    20. By creating a curriculum that allows for problem-based inquiry learning, high-level discussion, and collaboration.

      How to build skills of a 21st century learner.

    21. In small groups, the students had to choose appropriate keywords for searches. Groups shared their strategies for answering the question with the whole class.

      Idea for Lesson Plan

    22. The gradual release of responsibility to students is central to both approaches.

      I think that this is valuable for teachers to understand. Students should be shown how to complete/solve tasks and then be given the opportunity to learn and create their own solutions. If students are not given an opportunity to learn on their own, then they will fail in the real world.

    23. Reciprocal teaching revolves around four global comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing.

      The 4 Global Comprehension Strategies.

    24. Internet reciprocal teaching, involves problem-based tasks in which readers create their own text.

      Definition of Internet Reciprocal Teaching

    25. Students today must be prepared to navigate the new "Cs of change" that the 21st century has brought us. These Cs include such skills as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension.

      5 C's of Change in the 21st Century

    26. The structure of the textbook was a map that Sarah could easily follow.

      I can somewhat relate to this because when I read a textbook I use the bolded words to guide my reading and when I read online I use the search bar to find keywords.

    27. "You do not simply answer these questions. It is not answer number one; then answer number two. These are questions you keep in the back of your mind as you work."

      This quote explains how to use digital literacy correctly. One should not find an answer and move on but instead research and find credible sources and compile evidence to back that answer up.

    1. Do yourself a favor. Stop reading this newsletter. Go watch the documentary.

      Ha-ha ... I wish I had the time! Later ...

    2. The Great Hack

      I want to watch this! Thanks for calling my attention!

    1. Project Based Learning

      student-centered, active exploration of real-world challenges and problems

    2. Many times in our classrooms we create WebQuests to have students explore online resources.

      WebQuest seems to be difficult to create but "Webquests can be a valuable addition to a collaborative classroom. One of the goals is to increase critical thinking by employing higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge. This is a goal of the American educational system's Common Core and many new American state standards for public education."

    3. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      Student Inquiry Projects have a valuable purpose.

    4. understand “credibility” and “relevance”…but they do understand words like

      Great point!

    5. This also draws on tenets from Understanding by Design (UbD) as you begin with the end in mind and think about where you would like to bring students by the end of the project.

      This is something that is extremely important. Before planning any type of project, assess where you want your students to be and what you want them to learn!

    6. This work should also be compiled in a manner that is appropriate and accessible for your students and their grade level.

      I like that it is mentioned that the projects need to be age and grade level appropriate

    7. Students collaboratively (with the instructor) identify an area of interest and co-construct a driving question to guide inquiry.

      I have the hardest time trying to form a great driving question.

    8. There are many variations as the project is student interest driven, and may last any amount of time. The design, focus, and length of the Internet Inquiry Project should be determined by your student learning objectives,

      Key to a good planning of a project.

    9. WebQuests typically contain an introduction, task, process, evaluation, and conclusion.

      I have only ever done/ been assigned 2 webquests throghout my entire educational experience. I am interested in making one for one of my lesson plans. Personally when I was/am assigned webquests, I am only looking for answers and not thoughtfully reading. I would be interested to make one where I can have the students engaged and have them do their own research rather than looking for fill in the blanks.

    10. Students collaboratively (with the instructor) identify an area of interest and co-construct a driving question to guide inquiry. Students engage in online collaborative inquiry as they search and sift through online texts using digital tools to address their focus of inquiry. Students critically evaluate online information by considering the credibility (truthfulness) and validity (usefulness) of the information obtained. Students synthesize what they have learned during their online inquiry by actively curating and synthesizing information across multiple, multimodal sources. Student engage in online content construction by synthesizing what they have learned and selecting the best digital text or tool before sharing this answer.

      5 phases of the Internet Inquiry Project.

    11. This process involves the following five phases:

      5 phase project

    12. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      This is an important component of learning that I wish was included during my time in grade school.

    1. Student skills[edit] Typically, literacy in the classroom has focused on the following building blocks: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, text comprehension (NEIRTIC, 2004). However, as the electronic age permeates our society, students need to be prepared for jobs that require further literacy skills. Some of these skills include the following (Kinzer, 2003, para. 15): Keyboarding Layout and design skills for creating presentations and web pages Critical thinking about video, still images, audio, text, and interrelationships, and how they jointly convey intended and unintended messages Skill in using a variety of software types Information gathering, retrieval, and copying into presentation formats Scaling images

      Internet Workshop - instructional model that educates students on a newly emerging form of literacy, the Internet. It is good to be aware of the skills that my students will need as young adults, applying for jobs.

    1. How do you see Creative Commons and licensing affecting teaching and learning in K-12 or higher ed?

      Creative Commons is doing a very important job! There is a lot of misunderstanding in our world of education about who owns what and it is great to have an organization who specifically targets "reducing friction of sharing".

    2. Why SHARE? Why use SHARED content online?

      Or why not share? Excellent argument!

    1. What challenges and opportunities do you have from these experiences?

      Don Wettrick's approach is very attractive. He believes that what he does is great and that if he shares it, someone else can benefit from it. He acknowledges that the Internet is dangerous but so is driving a car. I agree with him and love his approach to openness and living a transparent life.

    1. Open Education Resources OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license permitting their free use or re-purposing by others Much of the challenge in identifying ownership is due to the fact that it is hard to differentiate between who is the user and who is the producer when it comes to open learning in the classroom.

    2. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/

      Specifically four areas of practice are covered by CC licenses: Reuse—the right to reuse content in its unaltered, verbatim form; Revise—the right to adapt, adjust, modify or alter the content itself; Remix—the right to combine the original or revised content with other content to create something new; and Redistribute—the right to make and share copies of the original content, revisions, or remixes with others (Wiley, 2010).

    3. Open Learning is ... a set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are openly accessible, free to use and access, and to re-purpose. Open Learning is a fantastic opportunity for learning together and learning from each other.

    4. Randall has frequent meetings with the Superintendent and school board in his district regarding the teaching and learning content that he is sharing openly online.

      Very interesting story about Randall. This must be common in rural area schools. Randall had a natural interest in recording his teachings and sharing it with students and parents. The reaction of the school leadership must have been discouraging but Randall was patient and finally the school leadership realized that what Randall was doing could be useful for the whole school. This is a good lesson about how new things sometimes meet opposition but with time, people will understand the importance of it and will agree and work together.

    5. or

      "Central to the challenges associated with the use of OER in the classroom are questions about the credibility, value, reliability, and permanence of access of these online materials (Zhang, 2001; Salmon, 2004; Chen et al., 2009)." Page 3 from Google Doc.

    6. Google Doc

      Page 3 of Google Doc explains what Open Education Resources (OER) is. (Repurposing publicly published materials).

    7. We uploaded a pre-publication draft of the column to allow for review, remix, and commentary.

      Randal does what I know many of my past teachers did/do. He shares what works in his classroom to other educators and he can look at worked for them. This is Teachers helping Teachers.

    8. . Open learning, also known as open education, can be defined as a set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are openly accessible, free to use and access, and to re-purpose.

      Sharing good ideas, lesson plans and resources can benefit everyone. When we can share and critique each other's work we can make lessons better and come up with new ideas together as well

    1. I clicked on both buttons but couldn't locate the "Strategies for online reading comprehension" article.

    1. It is fascinating how introducing more technology into the classroom can actually facilitate scaffolding and collaboration between peer groups.

    2. 5 c's!

    3. "Internet Inquiry is a perfect vehicle for helping your students think critically and carefully. Students have so many questions about the world around them and there are so many resources on the Internet to engage them."

    4. After watching this video, it became clear to me that the teacher truly thought the students were capable of completing the task on their own. By encouraging the students, he was able to provide them with support on his end, as well as foster a sense of trust and reliance upon their classmates.

    5. http://spcollege.libguides.com/Research_Strategies_college_students/search_databases

      Helpful video on this site about how to conduct research online.

    1. Internet Inquiry is a perfect vehicle for helping your students think critically and carefully. Students have so many questions about the world around them and there are so many resources on the Internet to engage them.

      This quote is everything that teachers need to see in order to be persuaded to implement internet inquiry into the classroom.

    2. About Internet InquiryBy Donald J. Leu As you and your students become more comfortable using the Internet, the Internet Inquiry approach can be an effective and high-interest method for developing research skills. Inquiry can be used by individuals or small groups of students. In Internet Inquiry, a topic or question is identified and researched. This research includes traditional sources (such as encyclopedias, atlases, and biographies) as well as Internet-based resources. Students analyze the information and prepare a report, which is then presented to the rest of the class. "The Internet allows students to look far beyond classroom walls and see the world in new and powerful ways." Five phases to Internet Inquiry

      Very helpful hint for teachers who feel like they are at a loss for how to implement internet inquiry into the classroom.

    3. "The Internet allows students to look far beyond classroom walls and see the world in new and powerful ways."

      It also helps students implement these skills in the real world!

    1. Interpretive Mode

      Good ideas for the World Language Classroom and a good opportunity to teach digital literacy skills, especially reading. Students can look for the information instead of the information just being handed to them.

    1. Beware online "filter bubbles" | Eli Pariser

      Really great video to make us and our students more aware of what the reality and bias of their searches are.

    1. Online Reading Comprehension - Strategy Exchange - Part one

      Really great use of visuals and classroom SOPs (standard Operating procedures.

    1. The market research agency Childwise has been tracking UK children’s media uses since 1997 – the very beginning of the internet for most of us. I remember interviewing a 6 year-old girl in 1997 who asked, in a puzzled voice, “is the internet something you plug into the back of your TV?” (In that project, too, the exciting new device was the CD-ROM!)

      Tech is more prevalent now than ever before.

    1. Scaffolding Online Readers ... new tools to check out and then decide whether or not it would be useful in my teaching, for my students. It's good!

    2. I love the breaking down of READ. It's very helpful!

    3. Keep us on our toes and keep us learning and adding new tools. We can't think that we have our degrees and now we just go ahead and teach what we have learned in school.

    4. The slide deck is great to keep me focused on what we're learning in a module. I enjoy the clear logic with which it is done!

    5. Yes, it can be overwhelming, and as being overwhelming can keep me away from dealing with it - unless I really need something, because when I really want to know something, I go after it and dig in and search until I find my answer!

    1. Quickly skimming the headings of a book gives students a high-level overview of what they are reading.

      this is a good tip especially because students will do this on standardized tests to help them understand the readings better

    2. 41% of parents say that their children do not enjoy reading.

      this is a great statistic because students should enjoy reading more

    1. This is where digital tools can provide security and opportunities for students to express themselves. Technology has a true purpose. Students still need to develop the ability–and confidence–to speak in class, but these tools can help by providing a comfortable way for students to develop their voice and express themselves.

      this is good for the teacher and student because a lot of these apps allow for anonymous feedback so a student does not feel targeted