17 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. “(1) the claimed invention was patented, described in a printed publication, or in public use, on sale, or otherwise available to the public before the effective filing date of the claimed invention”
    1. Nearly half of our applicant survey respondents reported posting at least 1 preprint, with several commenting that preprinting provided evidence of productivity outside of formal publication. A number of applicants commented that preprinting provided evidence of productivity outside of formal publication. Search committee survey respondents further confirmed that while published papers carry the most weight, preprints are generally viewed favorably. Future use of preprints as evidence of productivity records may have significant positive impacts on early career researchers, for whom timing of publications and job searches require critical considerations.
    2. Our limited survey of the search committee faculty members provided various insights. The majority (67%) said preprints were viewed favorably, although their strength may not be equivalent to published peer-reviewed work (Table S33).
    3. Preprints, or manuscripts submitted to an open-access server prior to peer-reviewed publication, are becoming increasingly popular among early career researchers, particularly in the life sciences (33,34,35) and are shown to boost article citations and mentions (29–31,37). We opted to address whether this increase in preprint submissions had an impact on the academic job market. While not all respondents answered our questions about preprints, we did receive 270 responses on this issue. Our survey data showed that 55% of these respondents (148 candidates) had posted at least one preprint throughout their career and 20% had posted between 2-6 preprints with an average of 1.57 preprints per person throughout their career thus far (Figure 2E, Table S8, S15). At the time of faculty job application, 40% of these respondents had an active preprint that was not yet published in a journal, with an average of 0.69 active preprints per person. Preprinted research was enormously helpful for a number of candidates (who explicitly commented) that preprints served to demonstrate productivity before their paper was published (Tables S26, S27).
  2. Aug 2019
  3. Jul 2019
  4. Jun 2019
    1. Data for bioRxiv preprints from start to November 2018 (covering metadata and traction on social media)

      Continues to be updated, viewable from rxivist.org and associated Zenodo data records (see link from rxivist)

      Preprint available at https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/515643v2

    1. Data for bioRxiv preprints from start to November 2018 (covering metadata and traction on social media)

      Continues to be updated, viewable from rxivist.org and associated Zenodo data records (see link from rxivist)

    1. The sample of 776 published articles with preprints was matched to 3647 published articles without preprints. Published articles with preprints had significantly higher Altmetric scores than published articles without preprints (median, 9.5 [IQR, 3.1 to 35.3] vs 3.5 [IQR, 0.8 to 12.2], respectively; between-group difference, 4 [IQR, 0 to 15]; P < .001) and received more citations (median, 4 [IQR, 1 to 10] vs 3 [IQR, 1 to 7]; between-group difference, 1 [IQR, −1 to 5]; P < .001).

      Preprinted work gets more attention as a publication later than non-preprinted articles.

    1. Data for submission growth and co-authorship networks from the 9 largest OSF preprint servers (all started in the past few years)

      Preprint of this work is available at: https://osf.io/5fk6c/

  5. Jan 2019
    1. Web annotation, for example, is catching on as a new mode of collaboration, peer review, and other research functions.

      And the combination of community feedback on preprints with traditional and post-publication peer review through collaborative annotation is catching on with a variety of publishers. See InReview by BMC and ResearchSquare. Also COS preprint servers such as SocArXiv and Psyarxiv.

  6. Jun 2018
    1. Acero F., Ackermann M., Ajello M. et al (Fermi-LAT) 2015 arXiv:1501.02003Preprint

      Starting in 2014-2015, AAS/IOP started linking to preprints in reference lists if they were the version cited by the author and an accepted manuscript did not at that time exist.

      Thus we now have built in "categories" for references, which could be expanded to include data/software sections.

  7. Jul 2016
  8. Mar 2016
    1. a report of her recent discoveries

      She did not post any "recent discoveries". She posted a Perspective/Review, which is typically used sum up other recent discoveries and/or propose new ideas.