3 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1. In short to add wiki-style functionality to my blog, the only functionality that is really needed is that 1) I myself have a edit button on static items, 2) the ability to categorise and tag those items, and 3) keep those items outside of the blog posting stream on the front page, and outside of the RSS feed. WordPress pages fit that description, when I’m logged in, and after adding a plugin to allow categories and tags on pages. So a page based section it is, or rather, will be over time.

      I like the idea of this and the overall structure. It reminds me a bit of Wikity which may provide this functionality plus a bit more. I really need to spin up a version and play around with it to see if it will give me what I'm looking for in terms of a blog linked with wiki-like functionality.

  2. Dec 2016
    1. Poe’s law also played a prominent role in Facebook’s fake news problem, particularly in the spread of articles written with the cynical intention of duping Trump supporters through fabrication and misinformation. Readers may have passed these articles along as gospel because they really did believe, for example, that an FBI agent investigating Hillary Clinton’s private email server died mysteriously. Or maybe they didn’t believe it but wanted to perpetuate the falsehood for a laugh, out of boredom, or simply to watch the world burn. Each motive equally possible, each equally unverifiable, and each normalizing and incentivizing the spread of outright lies.

      Both Vectors

      Fake news was spread by both people who believed it and people who thought it was funny. Interestingly, it was spread on both vectors simultaneously.

      Poe’s law also played a prominent role in Facebook’s fake news problem, particularly in the spread of articles written with the cynical intention of duping Trump supporters through fabrication and misinformation. Readers may have passed these articles along as gospel because they really did believe, for example, that an FBI agent investigating Hillary Clinton’s private email server died mysteriously. Or maybe they didn’t believe it but wanted to perpetuate the falsehood for a laugh, out of boredom, or simply to watch the world burn. Each motive equally possible, each equally unverifiable, and each normalizing and incentivizing the spread of outright lies.

      For some purposes it doesn't actually matter whether people believed it or not -- and this is where it gets interesting. The spreading of lies as hoaxes or lies as disinformation both undermine the idea of truth, and, as the author states, the "normalizing and incentivizing of outright lies.

  3. Jul 2016