227 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
  2. Jul 2019
    1. As an agenda for research, connected learning is about examining learning that cuts across the contexts of home, school, and peer culture, looking at the links and disjunctures between them.  As a learning theory, connected learning posits that the most meaningful and resilient forms of learning happen when a learner has a personal interest or passion that they are pursuing in a context of cultural affinity, social support, and shared purpose.

      Agenda (for research), learning theory (based on personal interest and passion) and model for design (connecting the spheres of home, school and peers).

    1. conventional forms of teaching and learning are not useful to prepare students for our dynamic and constantly shifting 21st century society

      This is a bold statement but we should also be aware of that with our choices as teachers, we are shaping the society of the 21st century as well. Also, not everything "old" is necessarily useless and bad, so we need to distinguish between "modern" and "valuable" as well as "old" and "worthless". I think one of the most important value that we need to teach to our students and to ourselves, too, is flexibility.

    1. YOUmedia

      Sounds like a great learning opportunity for Chicago teens where they can experiment with technology and find their interest while connecting with each other not only in the digital space but in real life, face-to-face as well.

  3. Jun 2019
  4. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. connect virtually with a network of educators around a common topic from the comfort of their own homes through the use of a twitter hashtag at a given time

      Did the author have connected learning principles explicitly in mind when creating this option (and the course in general)?

    2. We

      I'm interested to learn more about this "we" and how the group functions on an individual and collective level. I also read the title as a way for the members of the "we" to distinguish themselves and "how [they] do it" from other groups and how those groups do "it," which I'm assuming is teaching English with technology. Last note: I now have Montell Jordan's "This Is How We Do It" in my head as I begin the article, which is a plus.

  5. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. the quality of connection

      A tangential thought that may be addressed elsewhere, but I'm curious how/if CL in its various forms affects whether or not a teacher remains in the profession. Given our nation's teacher shortage, can/is CL be(ing) used to create and maintain communities that help teachers stay and grow in their classrooms?

    2. represent the spaces in whicha significant portion of the work is currently taking place

      I'm fairly new to CL, so I'm curious: how is CL viewed in more "traditional," for lack of a better word, academic circles?

    3. design principles

      For me, this is the focus. "Design with gaps and holes"

    4. 312

      Curious if there are thoughts by facilitators (or the authors of the study) to setting an open document for folks to add annotations and resources to, if they have some of their own? Just wondering how to put Connected Learning into action, here, as an extension of annotation on Connected Learning.

    5. practices that welcomed cMOOC newcomers to the cMOOC space

      This is so important ... it's crucial that new folks feel not just welcomed but invited to participate or to just observe ... this requires diligence on the part of facilitators ...

    6. Connected learning

    7. The goal for this annotated bibliography is to provide an overview of connected learning theory and research that is most relevant to teaching and learning in K-16+ school settings, which can serve as a resource for those interested in connected learning practice and outcomes

      This kind of curated work is important -- particularly in the kinds of spaces where information can get lost. There are lots of great ideas and resources but they seem to be all over the place, sometimes scattered, loosely connected. Perhaps more of this kind of weaving will help others see the possibilities of a Connected Learning underpinning.

  6. citejournal.s3.amazonaws.com citejournal.s3.amazonaws.com
    1. n this model, learning is of primary importance –not the tools.

      Nicely articulated ... I guess we can't say this enough ... I am thinking here of Audrey Watters' work around how the technology industry has long influenced the educational systems in order to sell more stuff to schools, and how those relationships at the top have filtered down into the classroom -- so, more high-end technology seems to equate to deeper learning, and we know (right?) that is not true.

    2. experiment

      Experiment=Play

    3. magic will ensue

      as if ...

    1. Digital badges are micro-credentials thatcontain data about the specific skills gainedwhen earning the badg

      I'm still pretty mixed on the value of digital badges. I have yet to be convinced that they mean anything in the long run ... can someone convince me otherwise?

    2. Leverage technology to help amplifyand disseminate youth voi

      Definitely helpful to use technology to spread the learning, but there are also other ways -- newspapers, fliers, forums, etc. https://letters2president.org/

    3. How can youactivate your networks in service of youryouth?

      I've seen this happen and been one asking for help via networks -- either through classroom connections or through adult mentors or through gathering resources. Leveraging networks can be powerful.

    4. peers and adults

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNcet150S5A&list=PLB494592AA0A4AE1F&index=5&t=0s

      This is where the technology might play a role -- making it easier to make connections with mentors who live elsewhere ... global connections ...

    5. youth are motivated to continue learning
  7. May 2019
    1. 102English Journal 107.6 (2018): 102–108Jemimah L. Young, Marquita D. Foster, and Dorothy Hines

      Our thanks to partner authors Jemimah Young, Marquita Foster, and Dorothy Hines for contributing to the 2018-19 LEARN Marginal Syllabus! Bios for each partner author are included at the end of this article.

    2. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

  8. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Baker-Doyle, K. J.

      Thank you Kira Baker-Doyle! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our fourth conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  9. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology & Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. West-Puckett, S., Smith, A., Cantrill, C., &Zamora, M.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our third conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  10. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Hsieh, B.

      Thank you Betina Hsieh! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our second conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  11. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Watulak, S. L., Woodard, R., Smith, A., Johnson, L., Phillips, N., & Wargo, K.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our first conversation! This is the first article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

    1. Everardo Pedraza and R. Joseph Rodríguez

      Our thanks to partner authors Everardo Pedraza and Joseph Rodriguez for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short bio of each author is included at the end of this article. And a Connected Learning TV webinar with both partner authors, and regular Marginal Syllabus participants, will go live on Tuesday, May 7th (and will be included in this annotation, too).

    2. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  12. Apr 2019
    1. greater control over how the spaces in which we live are socially produced

      An excellent example of this, also in Chicago, is the Mexican-American area known as Pilsen. One way the community has taken control is through the development of street murals, described here: https://interactive.wttw.com/my-neighborhood/pilsen/art-as-activism.

  13. Mar 2019
    1. Cultivating

      This open access version of "Cultivating urban literacies on Chicago's South Side through a pedagogy of spatial justice" is being publicly read, annotated, and discussed as a part of the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus. To learn more about this project and discussion, click Page Notes (above) to access additional information and linked resources.

    2. AndreAVaughan■rebeccA woodard■nAthAn c. phillips■kArAtaylor

      Our thanks to partner authors Andrea Vaughan, Rebecca Woodard, Nathan Phillips, and Kara Taylor for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! Additional biographical information about the authors is included at the end of this article. And a Connected Learning TV webinar featuring all the authors will be broadcast on Tuesday, April 2nd and also embedded in our annotation conversation, too.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our April conversation! This is the sixth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. Greetings everyone, I'm excited about CLX developing this connected learning guide! If you are participating in the feedback activities via Hypothesis annotation, and if you'd like to see analytics about the collaborative activity associated with this guide, please click here. This link will take you to the "crowd layers" dashboard, where you can view a summary of who is annotating, what types of annotations have been added, when annotations were written, if annotations are tagged, and more. I hope this is a useful tool that complements the broader feedback process.

    1. Language Arts Lessons

      This open access version of "Critical Indigenous Literacies: Selecting and Using Children's Books about Indigenous Peoples" is being publicly read, annotated, and discussed as a part of the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus. To learn more about this project and discussion, click Page Notes (above) to access additional information and linked resources.

    2. #OwnVoices

      Click here to read the latest tweets tagged #OwnVoices.

    3. American Indians in Children’s Liter-ature (https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com)

      "Established in 2006, American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL) provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children's and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society." Visit the site to read book reviews, Native media, and more.

    4. Debbie Reese

      Our thanks to partner author Debbie Reese for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short biography of Debbie Reese is included at the end of this article, and you can also learn more about her here.

    5. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    6. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our March conversation! This is the fifth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  14. Feb 2019
    1. Learning is motivating when it grows out of personal interest.

      Intrest motivates

    2. It is learning in an age of abundant access to information and social connection that embraces the diverse backgrounds and interests of all young people.
    3. Connected learning combines personal interests, supportive relationships, and opportunities.

      What connected learning combines

    1. Tanja BurkhardUniversity of PittsburghCarlotta PennThe Ohio State University

      Here's our Connected Learning TV webinar with partner authors Valerie Kinloch, Tanja Burkhard, and Carlotta Penn, also featuring regular Marginal Syllabus participants Michelle King and Cherise McBride - enjoy! https://youtu.be/XzK4jD3QaaY

    2. Valerie KinlochUniversity of Pittsburgh

      Our thanks to partner authors Valerie Kinloch, Tanja Burkhard, and Carlotta Penn for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A Connected Learning TV webinar featuring all three partner authors will be broadcast on Tuesday, Feb 5th, with the video also embedded here in our annotation conversation. Brief bios for all three partner authors are also included at the end of this article.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our February conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. it requires a“paradigmshift”for faculty development practitioners who are used to designing single pathwaylearning experiences that align objectives and content to particular, pre-set outcomes,to find ways to respect multiple learner epistemologies

      Thinking about working within the system to make change. Perhaps the two philosophies can co-exist. Learning outcomes with their linear path learning could be complimented by a student-decided outcome. The student could look at the syllabus for what faculty hope they will learn in the course, but then choose a final outcome or goal they personally have for taking the course. Then they could also propose how they are going to demonstrate their learning.

    2. But here I was talking tosomebody influential in the field, asking some basic questions and getting answers.

      The chat rooms are always so interesting. This space can really allow someone like this student to be a bit bolder.

    3. it is a good example of self-determination inthat the learner decides their own path:

      I've never attended a conference virtually before, but I can see how motivation is essential. In fact, it requires a plan for setting up the right space, computer connectivity, limiting distractions and joining with the intent to learn.

    4. Participants reflect on how they choose what gets said in thepublic and what stays in-group in the backchannel.

      This is a great distinction to make. I wish I would have been introduced to the digital realm with some understanding of what commentary is appropriate in different contexts.

    5. Public interactions are promoted by the facilitator oftenwith the facilitator engaging their own network to converse in community with the co-hort.

      I'm sure this can really stretch some of the participants. Various comfort levels with putting themselves out there.

    6. staff

      There are murmurings of letting the instructional designers from Pedago.me participate in a #digPINS session.

    7. But how are faculty ever to create networkedlearning experiencesin open online spacesfor students if they have never experienced learning for themselves in these spaces?

      Yes! This a brilliant way to build faculty's digital literacy. Provide and model the experience in order to build confidence.

    8. education is always political,

      I've never heard it put so plainly. Perhaps any time one challenges the status quo it is political. This also helps explain why making change can be so hard. It could be a really uncomfortable position especially when you factor in the different ages of faculty development that an educator might be in at the time of critical reflection and asking for change.

  15. Jan 2019
    1. finding mentors and collaborators whohave no hierarchical relationship with them internally

      This is an important point: mentors & collaborators outside of a program's hierarchical relationship. I am much more likely to be authentic about my personal/professional growth when there is no hidden agenda or expectations.

    2. ifferentiate between different ages of fac-ulty developmen

      I love how the ages of teaching are broken down here. There is almost an unfair expectation for all educators to be fully evolved right out of the gate, but as with all things expertise takes time. Being able to somewhat gauge where an educator is on their journey is a nice indicator to have, especially as an instructional designer who works hard to meet faculty where they are in their journey and not overwhelm them.

    3. Kalir (in press)

      It's an honor to be cited by Maha and Autumm in their paper! This particular article was published at the end of 2018 as "Equity-oriented design in open education." Here's the journal's version as well as an open access preprint.

    4. A call for promoting ownership, equity, andagency in faculty development viaconnected learning

      Looking forward to this connected and collaborative annotation jam. Feel free to jump in anytime, but be sure to join January 31 from 6-8pm to connect with the live Denver audience.

      A big thank you to Maha and Autumm for creating and sharing these ideas; ones we will all collectively benefit from.

    1. Allison Skerrett, Amber Warrington, and Thea Williamson

      Our thanks to partner authors Allison Skerrett, Amber Warrington, and Thea Williamson for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short bio for each scholar is included at the end of this article. Also, all partner authors joined Marginal Syllabus readers and facilitators in a Connected Learning TV webinar about this article that will be available to view via Educator Innovator on Tuesday, January 8th - please watch as a complement to reading and annotating this important article!

    2. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our January conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  16. Dec 2018
    1. Digital Storytelling for Students With Learning Disabilities

      This article adds to my information on some specific kids that digital storytelling really helps and will add LD students to my post. The ideas in this post also reflect a lot of those from my previous articles so it helps hold those ideas solid for my post.

    2. They can choose how to develop their story so it can convey the right meaning.

      With digital storytelling, students are able view their own stories as an audience member as many times as they want to be able to see how their story is being portrayed and if it is not being portrayed as the author would have hoped, it is accessible so that they can go in and fix it.

    3. students are able to gain confidence

      Confidence is a big factor, especially with LD students. If they believe that they can't create good writing then they won't and vise versa. We must employ strategies and activities to allow all students to feel confident and know that they can create amazing pieces of work.

    4. Digital storytelling opens up opportunities to scaffold traditional literacy for students with learning disabilities in order to help them learn and master new skills by applying them in a creative way.

      Digital storytelling provides these students with a stepping stool and provides them with support for creating pieces of writing.

    5. Many students with learning disabilities have difficulty putting their thoughts to writing and/or lose focus while writing down their thoughts, due to the physical act of writing.

      when you take out the physical act of writing, the students are able to express themselves in ways that they are more comfortable with and enjoy

    6. It provides students with the ability to do research, explore innovative technology, and collaborate with peers to tell a story.

      with technology in their hands, they are able to do so much that helps them get into their own story

    1. Digital Storytelling: Extending the Potential for Struggling Writers

      This article is so full of information on how digital storytelling helps struggling writers and goes in to detail about some specific types of kids and how digital storytelling helps them directly with the part of writing that they struggle with. This article will be great for the details and direct example of how digital storytelling helps many types of students who are struggling in different areas as well as all students.

    1. This text provides the general information and benefits of storytelling that I will be able to use to help back up digital storytelling in which my project will be about.

    2. In pursuit of lifelong literacy, we must remember as Eisner (1985) stated that, “The enduring outcomes of education are found in...the joy of the ride, not merely arriving at the destination.” (p. 35).

      LOVE

    3. Using storytelling to discuss many different types of stories, students can make decisions about what type of story they want to tell and what details they should include by participating in oral discussions with a partner or the class (Black, 2008)

      Social side

    4. many younger students give up and merely stop writing when they cannot think of anything to say.

      especially students who are easily frustrated or consider themselves "bad" writers.

    5. There are two key areas that storytelling positively impacts to improve student writing: use of language and identification of audience.

      Both of which are important for young writers to develop

    6. nstead of passively receiving directions on how and what to write about, students make key decisions about their writing with the teacher as model, coach, and facilitator.

      Students are able to self regulate their learning and be in control which is something all people desire to do. When they do this, they are more motivated because they are able to do what they want to do and in turn do it better.

    7. Nicolini (1994) states that, “We are by nature storytellers; therefore, it only makes sense to allow students a chance to first do something at which they are already good.” (p. 58).

      Giving students a mode that they are unafraid of they are more likely to take risks and not hold back from telling the story that they want to tell, and not changing it in fear that they wont be able to spell all the words or make the sentences.

    8. Through active engagement, storytelling as a pedagogical strategy can strengthen reading comprehension by helping students develop of a sense of story (Aiex, 1988; Craig, Hull, Haggart, & Crowder, 2001; Phillips, 1999)

      You always learn better through doing

    9. In storytelling, the interaction is personal, engaging, and immediate (Aiex, 1988)

      All important for children's learning and understanding

    10. In a study conducted by Cliatt and Shaw (1988), the researchers reported that storytelling not only helped participants enhance the language and logic skills of the children but also resulted in the development of positive attitudes towards instruction

      storytelling=better attitudes=better reading and writing

    11. Wallace (2000) noted that, “The phenomenon of storytelling actually becomes a common language that facilitates meaningful communication; we can hear and understand each other’s stories because we can usually recognize ourselves in the stories of others- no matter how varied our cultural backgrounds” (p. 436).

      Building off of each other and creating a community of strong writers. Building this kind of relationship can go a long way with their confidence which can in turn lead to better writing and the cycle will just keep going.

    12. Researchers have found that literacy instruction is most effective when developed through social interaction and collaboration with others (Dugan, 1997). This pedagogical strategy capitalizes on students’ desire to talk and interact with others.

      Children are very social beings and love to share about all kinds of things with you, we should extend this excitement to writing.

    13. Storytelling is defined as, “relating a tale to one or more listeners through voice and gesture” (National Council of Teachers of English, 1992, p. 1). Because storytelling relies on both the listener and the teller, this strategy utilizes the social element of language.

      I guess I never really viewed storytelling through writing as social but even in writing it allows the writer to have their voice and share their voice with others.

    14. Others have carried this connection further and believe that, “reading like a writer allows one to actually become a writer” (Langer & Flihan, 2000, p. 126)

      Reading and writing have a close tie and because reading progresses faster than writing we should use it to help progress our writing as well. A lot of what children read in their early grades are stories and so by writing stories they can match what they are reading, we can help them achieve greater success in writing.

    15. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) reported that, “one out of every five of our nation’s school-age children suffer from reading failures” (ASHA, n.d., Facts on Literacy Section)

      While this number can't completely disappear but we should be working toward finding ways to make this number smaller and smaller.

  17. Nov 2018
    1. Allowing students who struggle with forming letters in a fluent manner-like Colleen-to compose on the computer removes the handwriting obstacle and also eliminates for the reader the difficulty of reading visually challenging handwritten text. By sharing their stories through narrated movies, the handwriting obstacle is removed and replaced by the pitch and expression of students' own voices.

      By taking out the writing, we are able to see how students can create stories and see how they can compose a story. When you take out the worry of the writing, the students feel free to be as creative as they want to and can because they feel like they can be successful at that creative level.

    2. he process of creating a storyboard after drafting their stories helps the writers visualize the story as it unfolds and more concretely reveals to them any gaps or omissions of details that are important to plot development. Once the omissions are visualized, students add details to make their stories more fluid and comprehensible.

      Another example of how digital storytelling can help students who struggle with adding the details to create flow in a story, visualizing seeing it through pictures in the storyboard.

    3. Giving students an environment in which interaction and collaboration are encouraged help them write more productively.

      Students can learn a lot from each other and can grow their own ideas just from talking to others and the computer screen is an easy way for others to view others work to get ideas of what they're doing.

    4. The interactive nature of composing a digital stor y reduces nonproduction resulting from disengagement or distractions. Undoubtedly the countless graphics and music clips available on the Internet may also be a distraction, but limiting the websites that students may access and setting a time frame to select graphics and music may reduce the distractibility. On the other hand, the multimedia used to create a digital story promotes active learning and collaboration: two approaches to learning that help distracted students stay engaged with the assignment.

      With structure, digital storytelling keeps easily distracted and disengaged kids on task an engaged with the tasks and active learning and collaboration.

    5. Not only did the assistant principal affirm the student as a writer by commenting about the content of his story but also verified him as a storyteller by making specific comments about his articulate narration. As a result, when this Kyle type returned home, he voluntarily created a digital story

      When the students have others compliment them, especially their insecurities, they become more sure of themselves and confident and then when they are confident they enjoy the tasks more because they believe that the product will be great so they are more likely to want to create things on their own for fun which in turn gives them more practice so that they can become even better and this can just form a cycle of improvement.

    6. By encouraging this Kyle type to draw his own illustrations to depict scenes for his digital story, the project became more meaningful to him.

      When the student is able to create exactly what they want, they are more connected to the piece and able to take more ownership of it. When given only a certain set of things to choose from they are less excited about it, especially if there isn't an option that directly elicits what they are trying to portray and that leads to frustration and they settle with less.

    7. fter she recorded and listened to her narration, she realized it was too fast and expressionless, and she willingly chose to rerecord the narration until the recording satisfied her.

      Allows them self correct to make sure it sounds to others how they want it to sound.

    8. Although they promptly begin an assigned writing task and complete it, they are reluctant to make any type of revision. Creating a movie gives them a reason for writing and makes them more conscious of their audience, one that reaches beyond themselves and their teacher, and motivates them to write more clearly and with more detail. They employ their artistic ability by drawing pictures to illustrate their stories, scan and save the illustrations, and then import them into a video-editing program.

      One good example of how digital storytelling helps one group of struggling students.The idea that this can be viewed by may makes them want to write so that everyone can read and understand and make meaning and then they get to add the illustrations as well.

    9. Digital storytelling has the capacity to not only motivate struggling writers as they experience the enjoyment of creating stories enhanced by multimedia, but also to reposition themselves from struggling writers to competent writers.

      Allows them to view themselves differently so that when they are traditionally writing, their new attitudes about writing will show in their work. Believing that they are good writers will allow them to be more confident in their writing and their writing will improve.

    10. The process of storyboarding facilitates the introduction of events in a logical and orderly sequence thereby illuminating gaps or omissions overlooked in a traditionally composed draft. When these breaks in the flow of the story are realized, the writer can make necessary revisions in the draft before recording the narration.

      They are able to visually see the story to watch it flow. With the composition simply in words, they are less likely to be able to picture it in their head and watch the flow to see if it has any gaps. When they are able to put it into a storyboard they can see it and it also gives them a way to solve the issue before they do the final product, and with writing it always feels more final especially for kids and they are less inclined to fix the problem if there is one because it is more intimidating because it all seems like one piece. In a storyboard it is all broken up so its easier to fix the small pieces of the whole.

    11. Students' narrations of their stories reduce overt weaknesses in conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and handwriting.

      Gives them more confidence

    12. Teachers report an increase in student motivation to write when they know their writing will be published on the Internet (Karchmer, 2001)

      I feel like this is true throughout all ages. Even now, knowing that something has the possibility of being seen by any, I pay really close attention making sure everything I do makes me sound smart. I am more likely to read over it multiple times to make sure everything is right.

    13. Once movies are created, showing them to the class is the publishing step in the writing process and should not be omitted because students generally enjoy showing their movies.

      Children are proud of their creations, there is sometimes a fear of sharing writing, especially those seen as not great writers. I never viewed myself as a good writer and I still don't like letting others read my work.

    14. personal photographs

      Create a greater tie to the piece

    15. seven elements

      Much like written composition, point of view, dramatic question, emotions, even economy and pacing, all fall into written compositions. Digital story telling adds the gift of voice and a soundtrack. These ideas allow the student to get creative and feel more connected to piece of work that they are creating. Young student sometimes struggle with the idea that you have a voice in writing because to them, its just words on a page, but through digital storytelling they feel like they really are telling their story and they are doing it out loud.

    16. they confidently explore new software, devices, or other technological tools.

      Students more likely to take risks and try new things with technology then on paper?

    17. may struggle with traditional literacy, tapping into other literacies may boost their motivation and scaffold their understanding of traditional literacies.

      using literacy to build upon literacy. By allowing them to use a mode that they are more interested in or are seen as higher achievement in, they will be more motivated in the terms of traditional literacy.

    18. limit students' writing opportunities to experiences that prepare them for testing

      "Teaching to the test" this is something that has has become a huge thing in the class but is it the best way to truly prepare them? Can we use methods besides directly what is on the test to get the same ideas across and maybe even move farther for a better understanding?

    19. assigning everyone the same topic

      As stated earlier in the article, it talks about how lack of interest influences the quantity and quality of the work. By giving all students the same prompt, some may have a bigger interest or connection to whatever the prompt may be so it may, before the writing has even started, already separated into two groups of students. How else could we check for kids writing level? how can we address the idea of giving all kids an assessment that is more up their alley.

    20. Furthermore, incomplete knowledge or lack of interest in an assigned topic may influence the quantity and quality of a composition (Graham & Harris, 1997).

      "lack of interest" how can we help peak their interest and give them something that they are excited about while still having this idea of a composition? can digital storytelling combat this lack of interest to help improve the quality of a composition for these learners?

    21. Although their compositions are replete with spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and handwriting errors, they are less likely to revise spelling, punctuation, grammar, or the text to increase the clarity of their communication (Englert, 1990; MacArthur & Graham, 1987)

      Why is this? Misconception about good writers? Expectations of themselves?

    22. Using this multimedia approach in the classroom helps students discover voice, confidence, and structure in their writing

      Helpful for all students

    23. Creating digital stories acts as a motivator for students, thus they remain engaged throughout the project (Burn & Reed, 1999). Additionally, digital stories provide an alternative conduit of expression for those students who struggle with writing traditional text (Reid, Parker, & Burn, 2002).

      Students who don't learn best through traditional means, and therefore are at a high risk of falling behind, can benefit from creating these digital stories to help them become more engaged in the content.

  18. Oct 2018
    1. “For more than a century, educators have strived to customize education to the learner. Connected Learning leverages the advances of the digital age to make that dream a reality — connecting academics to interests, learners to inspiring peers and mentors, and educational goals to the higher order skills the new economy rewards.

      Connected learning allows learning to be more personalized to the individual student. It connects their academics to their interests, learners to peers & mentors who are interested in the same thing (digital world) and education goals to higher goals and skills.

    1. The research is clear: Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      I really like the idea of connected learning. Linking children's interests to what they are learning is a great tool. I feel like if you give children freedom to explore what they want but somehow prompt them into achieving what you, as the teacher want, the learning process will be great and exciting.

    2. Learning is motivating when it grows out of personal interest. A growing body of research indicates that interest helps us pay attention, make connections, persist and engage in deeper learning. For example, when reading about games they enjoy playing, teenage boys read at a much higher level than their reading level in school.

      This is so powerful as a future teacher learning the importance and how to incorporate students' interests into the classroom. When interest is sparked this motivation is created and as this model states it can create somewhat of a chain reaction that can open the doors to so many relationships and opportunities in the future. I think I can incorporate interest into my PBL unit plan and hopefully motivate the students to engage in the learning and collaborate with peers.

  19. Jul 2018
    1. As part of their learning plan, students also wrote or edited a Wikipedia article relevant to their particular focus area.

      This can be a notoriously hard task. In part of an awesome address to K-State, Jim Groom spoke about his experiments teaching with Wikipedia. (at 16:50 of the video below) https://youtu.be/Ne6jV1kefp4 His talk is an important one for folks thinking about how where these OER OEP conversations have been, are now, and should be headed.

    2. He asked students to identify a particular question and develop a learning plan for exploring that ques-tion during the course. He also required that students update and improve the course OER, create new OER where needed, and decide how they should be graded.

      I appreciate the production centered nature of this approach, they learn about OER by using them, critiquing them and helping to create them.

    1. Traditional education is failing to engage many students as they enter their middle school, high school, and college years. The culture clash between formal education and interest-driven, out-of-school learning is escalating in today’s world where social communication and interactive content is always at our fingertips. We need to harness these new technologies for learning rather than distraction.

      When we were in elementary grades, connected learning wasn't needed due to not a lot of interactive content being used by us and it wasn't a common interest. Now, traditional education IS failing without technology because of the increase of interactive contact and younger students need to stay engaged with communication in order to be interested in what they are learning.

  20. May 2018
    1. “High” Tech Strategies

      And the inevitable high tech options that can be out of reach for a lot of families and school districts. The IEP requires, if it is agreed upon by the committee, that the school does everything possible within reason to get the device.

    2. These strategies involve some type of battery operated device such as a tape-recorder, that enhance specific skill areas. Most devices in this category refer to Voice Output Communication Aids (VOCAs

      The next level of tech that includes battery operated devices. With growing inclusion of smart devices in classrooms, I could see this being an easily accessible option for a lot of students. Apps and programs are often easily purchasable and accessible.

    3. Assistive Technology for children with Autism and Aspergers

      This article caught my eye with the categories of assistive technology it presents. It displays low tech, mid tech, and high tech options. This can be crucial to not only finding which is appropriate for non verbal ASD students, but what is also within economic and accessible boundaries.

    4. dry erase board, a photograph, clipboards

      Low tech options include everyday material that you can find in everyday classrooms. Easily accessible and easily used.

    1. defining what exactly is meant by "non-verbal." For instance, some individuals have spoken words, but do not use them functionally, while others may have little spoken language but are able to use it to communicate their needs. The first day of the meeting was focused on developing a description

      Interesting note here. Defining what it means to be non verbal and determining the degree to which one is non verbal. Each individual are a separate case by case instance that can make results vary.

    2. "We still know very little about the cognitive capabilities of nonverbal people with autism, and how best to help them learn to communicate,"

      ASD is a relatively new disorder without a lot of research behind it, leading to a lack of information of how to best help this group of people.

    3. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of individuals living with autism spectrum disorders are non-verbal.

      This is a large portion of ASD, not including those that are limitedly verbal that could also use assistive technology.

    1. “People with autism bring strengths that we need at Microsoft,” she said, adding that “some have amazing ability to retain information, think at a level of detail and depth, or excel in math or code.”

      I like how this article shines light on how assistive technology can aid the transition for ASD people to have success in the real world. Microsoft here invests in ASD people and they are able to exhibit their strengths in the work place and with the abilities show in this text.

    2. She further explains that even a grocery store or movie theater can be filled with distractions and triggers that will continue to elicit autistic behaviors,

      The need for assistive technology goes beyond the classroom as seen here. IEP research that I have done indicates that students who require assistive technology through the school can request for the service to be taken home as well. This decision is made in the ARD meeting and can be discussed as an option.

    3. Visual Scene Displays — a type of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) — that give detailed context to common situations. She cited an app called Scene Speak, as well as more dynamic ones like TouchChat, Look2Learn and Tobii Sono Flex. The latter programs turn symbols into speech, allowing less-verbal children a better way to communicate.

      Some direct examples of apps that are being used as assistive technology for students who are non verbal. The app is a medium between the students and to those whom they are trying to communicate with. It taps emphasis into visual skills to compensate for verbal deficiencies. A growing trend in schools as this article advocates.

    1. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    2. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and May’s conversation! This is the eighth and final text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  21. Apr 2018
    1. A child is allowed to take a device home if it is needed to enable him/her to benefit from his/her educational program as determined by the IEP team

      Not just for school use only, but instead an emphasis on improving all facets of life.

    2. Assistive technology means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially, off-the-shelf, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities. Federal law requires that school districts identify the assistive technology needs that would benefit your child in his or her Individualized Education Program (IEP).

      Key vocabulary and terminology for Special Education and for parents to know about when entering their child's IEP/ARD meetings. It is so important for parents to know their rights, demanding for the law to be held up in their schools.

    3. New technologies have created opportunities and higher expectations for full inclusion of individuals with autism into all aspects of society, beginning with the classroom.

      Technology creating a pathway for easier lifestyles and for students to achieve and succeed. Technology used in concept of fairness, giving a child what he or she needs to achieve success in the classroom.

    1. %0#$!204%).!<&%!#0I!0'()4$*&#46!1*22,34%:(2$!50!%0J0%20'!*#$&!$.0!204%).!<&%!$.0*%!*#2$*$($*&#46!*#J0%20^!0'()4$*&#46!5,64%I.*).!.0*;.$0#!$.0!&BB&%$(#*$/!<&%!04).!&#0!$&!$%4#2<&%:!04).!:&:0#$!&<!.*2!6*J*#;!*#$&!&#0!&<!604%#*#;O!2.4%*#;O

      Networks (back and forth) not funnels (one way). If this isn't a summing up of CLMOOC, I don't know what is.

    1. Educating Youth for Online Civic and PoliticalDialogue: A Conceptual Framework for the Digital Age

      Our thanks to partner author Erica Hodgin for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Erica and guest reader Paul Oh joined Marginal Syllabus co-founders Joe Dillon and Remi Kalir for a CLTV webinar discussion about this text - it will air "live" on Tuesday, April 3rd at 4p PT.

    2. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and April's conversation! This is the seventh text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open technology for web annotation.

  22. Mar 2018
    1. A game to play as you begin this annotation or one to end with after you have done with it: an empathy map.

      Here is another set of directions.

    2. April Baker-Bell, Raven Jones Stanbrough, and Sakeena Everett

      Our thanks to partner authors Drs. April Baker-Bell, Raven Jones Stanbrough, and Sakeena Everett for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus. A conversation with our partner authors will air "live" on Tuesday, March 6th at 4 pm PT/7p ET - watch it here, it's a really amazing conversation.

    3. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

  23. Feb 2018
    1. Educating for Democracy in a Partisan Age:Confronting the Challenges of MotivatedReasoning and Misinformation

      Find a supporting conversation on Educator Innovator's Connected Learning TV, where Joseph Kahne talks in depth about some of these findings and implications for educators: https://educatorinnovator.org/webinars/educating-for-democracy-in-a-partisan-age/

    2. Joseph KahneUniversity of California, RiversideBenjamin BowyerSanta Clara University

      Our thanks to partner authors Joe Kahne and Ben Bowyer for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Joe also joined a number of educators for a Connected Learning TV webinar that will air on February 6th at 4p PT. You can watch it here.

    3. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and February’s conversation! This is the fifth text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  24. Jan 2018
    1. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    2. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and January’s conversation! This is the fourth text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  25. Dec 2017
    1. I try to make my literacy work a sustained argument against inequality and injustice.

      Thanks to dogtrax (Kevin Hodgson) for both his blog post inviting educators-as-annotators to create "a multimedia collage of thoughts and connections," as well as his annotations in these margins that blend hand-written with digital marginalia (here's one example), I'll share another from my reading:

      I'm inspired by Linda's emphasis on teaching as a sustained argument against inequality. In doing such work (for it is work, and more on that later), what - and who - offers sustenance so as to sustain such argumentation? How is such work sustained, particularly over time? And what is the role of networks in sustaining arguments against inequality? I also appreciate Linda's use of the word "work," for teaching is a labor - in this case, literacy education is a means of laboring for equality and justice.

    2. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    3. Linda Christensen

      Our thanks to partner author Linda Christensen for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Linda will be featured alongside Andrea Zellner (Literacy Consultant for Oakland Schools and Teacher Consultant, Red Cedar Writing Project), Kevin Hodgson (6th grade teacher in Southampton, Massachusetts and Outreach Co-director at Western Massachusetts Writing Project), and Marginal Syllabus organizers Joe Dillon and Remi Kalir in a Connected Learning TV webinar scheduled to air on Tuesday, December 5th. This annotation will be updated to include that webinar video.

    4. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and December's conversation! This is the third text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  26. Nov 2017
    1. COLLABORATION: Connected teachers work collaboratively. CURIOSITY: Connected teachers bring an inquiry mindset to classroom practice. COURAGE: Connected teachers give up some of their control over the learning experience. CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: Connected teachers engage their students in public life. CARE: Connected teachers share their interests and learning with their students.

      the 5Cs of connected teaching

    1. Chapter 6

      This chapter by Nicole and Antero is associated with an issue of the journal Review of Research in Education that explores the theme "Disrupting Inequality Through Education Research." If Marginal Syllabus participants are interested in other articles from this issue and do not have access via an academic institution, please contact me privately (i.e. via Twitter DM, I'm @remikalir) and we'll make arrangements.

    2. Nicole MirraThe University of Texas at El PasoaNtero GarciaColorado State University

      Our thanks to partner authors Nicole Mirra and Antero Garcia for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! We anticipate that Nicole and Antero will join our annotation conversation throughout November. In addition, please check out these additional resources:

      • Nicole and Antero will be featured in an episode of Connected Learning TV, alongside Marginal Syllabus organizers Joe Dillon and Remi Kalir, scheduled to air on Tuesday, November 7th. We will update this annotation and embed the video once it's recorded.
      • Antero was also a partner author during the 2016-17 Marginal Syllabus. Antero and co-author Cindy O’Donnell-Allen contributed the introduction from their book Pose, Wobble, and Flow: A Culturally Proactive Approach to Literacy Instruction. You are very welcome to read and join that previous annotation conversation, too.
    3. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and November's conversation! This is the second text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  27. Oct 2017
    1. While wealthy families are embracing the potential of new technologies for learning, and investing more and more in out-of-school and connected learning, less privileged kids are being left behind. Access to specialized, interest-driven and personalized learning used to be difficult and scarce. But in today’s networked world, there’s no reason why all children should not have the opportunity to pursue connected learning.

      technology should not just be for rich students. technology should be accessible to all students in the classroom and should be incorporated into their learning

    2. We need to harness these new technologies for learning rather than distraction.

      Instead of banning technology from the classroom teachers should incorporate it. this way teachers can keep their students interested and keep their teaching style modern.

  28. Sep 2017
    1. Digital Media and Learning conference

      We're really excited to launch the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus at the same time as the 2017 Digital Media and Learning Conference, held at UC Irvine. If you're attending DML and want to learn more about the Marginal Syllabus, many people from our organizing team will also be attending and can talk with you about using Hypothesis and joining these public annotation conversations:

      • Christina Cantrill from the National Writing Project
      • Liana Gamber-Thompson, from NWP's Educator Innovator
      • Jeremy Dean, Director of Education at Hypothesis
      • Remi Kalir, Asst Prof of Learning Technologies at CU Denver

      The Marginal Syllabus will also be featured during the session "Layered Learning: Web Annotation in Collaborative and Connected Contexts," on Friday, October 6th, 2p in Emerald Bay DE.

    2. writing an account of the political lives of American Muslim youths

      Again, here's Marginal Syllabus partner author Sangita Shresthova's text "Between Storytelling and Surveillance: The Precarious Public of American Muslim Youth,” which was featured in the 2016-17 Marginal Syllabus.

    3. This blog post

      Our thanks to partner author Henry Jenkins for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Henry previously contributed to the 2016-17 Syllabus last April; we read and annotated a chapter from By Any Media Necessary, by Sangita Shresthova, titled "Between Storytelling and Surveillance: The Precarious Public of American Muslim Youth." Sangita, Henry, and a number of other Marginal Syllabus collaborators - Neta Kligler-Vilenchik, Liana Gamber-Thompson, and Joe Dillon - joined a webinar about the text and our annotation conversation: https://youtu.be/E9NHC9YqOTg

    4. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    5. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! This is the first text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  29. Jun 2017
    1. toughest

      I look forward to learning what "toughest" means--as a character attribute or as a teacher characterization expressing how difficult Abaham was to 'teach' or...?

    2. Walking away from this webinar tonight thinking about what critical work this is to do. We need to do it together. Thank you for being here and annotating with us.

      Additional resources:

  30. May 2017
    1. he texted to tell me

      A small but important detail - despite their conflict and mediation, Abraham could still text Bronwyn. Whenever a teacher, school, or district suggests limiting the means of accessibility and conversation among educators and students (including providing phone numbers), this story is a great example of why that matters.

    2. school gravity

      This phrase was used earlier and I'd like to know more... which means I should probably read Bronwyn's entire book!

    3. He was the student who, without trying to, called me out consistently on my own detrimental tendencies by churning them up and then handing me a figurative mirror to look at myself.

      What a powerful reflection on a student-teacher relationship that eschews placing blame and rather seeks to find a sense of nuanced understanding in a rather complex human relationship. Thank you for sharing!

    4. Writing was a way of communicating in our class that offered him acceptance and an invitation to join the community.

      I appreciate this framing of writing as a collection of practices that mediates participation in various contexts, from the personal to the more academic and communal.

    5. The only agency that his narrative offered him was the ability to rid the world of his existence

      What a sobering analysis.

    6. he wrote

      The following is incredibly powerful! On a tangential note, I'm curious about how Bronwyn worked with Abraham (and other students) to get access to and use their writing in her book. No doubt Bronwyn likely details this elsewhere in her book, though some background for the purposes of our conversation would be grand.

    7. academic dexterity

      How many educators take the time to learn about the academic dexterity of their students?

    8. in the two years that this chapter captures

      I was recently at a research conference and presented during a session on methodological complexities in studies of learning. Long story short, one of the presenters critiqued the often short timescales of many studies (often less than a few months, if that), and advocated years-long engagement with learners - despite many of the challenges that come with sustaining inquiry over such a period of time. Nonetheless, educators are uniquely positioned to conduct inquiry over longer timescales.

    9. Abraham’s academic success was inextricable from his ability to develop and sustain positive relationships with adults

      An inverse of this statement is fascinating to consider, too: Educators' pedagogical success is inextricable from their ability to develop and sustain positive relationships with learners.

    10. to pull constructive meaning from a destructive story

      Though specific to the context of Abraham's learning, this statement strongly resonates across other intellectual and professional contexts...

    11. create narrative truth

      Truth as creative.

    12. “It’s like if I had another me right here.”

      This book is filled with powerful quotes, like this, from the students.

    13. Through the narrative curriculum, I hoped that the students and I could together create a restorative class community that would provide academic support and school gravity for Abraham.

      I was happy to see this chapter move into a focus on restorative practices since there are many resources to support this kind of practices in schools and community spaces. Maybe as part of this project we can gather some together to share?

    14. Like Hazel, Abraham was able to see himself on the written page.

      Making connections here between the different chapters of this book that highlight the work of different students.

    15. Figure 5.1. “He ran back to Solomon’s store and caught a glimpse of himself in the plate glass window. He was grinning. His eyes were shining. He was as eager and happy as he had ever been in his life.”

      Okay. In tears at this point. Just to say.

    16. I wanted to deal with our conflict by engaging him in conversation about its root causes, rather than rely on positional power in a way that would hold no real power with him.

      Important statement here; restorative approach.

    17. The concepts and strategies embedded in the narrative curriculum were my approach to classroom discipline for Abraham.

      Powerful.

      What are the implications ultimately of this approach? What is possible if we think more this way about our shared work in education and learning?

    18. hey are unethical.

      +1

    19. Pedro Noguera, who has written extensively on this topic, argues that “the marginalization of students who are frequently punished occurs because schools rely primarily on two strategies to discipline students who misbehave: humiliation and exclusion” (2008, p. 133)

      Coming from a family where I too can see the devastating results of humiliation and exclusion ... and how totally unhelpful they are in resolving anything at all (they always make it worse, in fact) I so appreciate Bromwyn sharing alternative visions of what is possible.

    20. Our class practice of sharing writing had a noticeable impact on Abraham.

      This focus on sharing is important. Making and then sharing. Very much speaks to a constructionist framework as well as an essential practice I've learned through working with writing project teachers like Bronwyn.

    21. Along these lines

      The proceeding sentences here show an important framework around the work she is doing here.

    22. Hell breaks loose

      Wow. Powerful image.

    23. The figures in this drawing were different from the previous two in that the faces had no features

      This sequence shows to me a teacher who is paying close attention to what students are creating. This distinction is subtle and also important.

    24. We wanted to dis-engage Abraham from disruptive behaviors, but we did not want to disengage him as a person. We did want to engage him as a student, which required us to provide learning experiences that would show him how education could bring self-awareness and other tools to ease the pain.

      This strikes me as a key intention in this work and therefore this chapter/description of the work with Abraham as case is a way to demonstrate one example of how a school/classroom can be a place of caring while also remain focused on learning.

    25. Our administra-tion and I knew that we needed to handle these incidents with concern for how the messaging would affect his sense of self.

      Powerful statement here about administration working with the teachers on behalf of the students well-being.

    26. Our relationship could become antagonistic, but not in the traditional sense where teachers and students are disconnected or unable to relate to each other’s positions. Abraham struggled to maintain closeness without eruptions of anger or distrust, and I struggled to handle conflict without taking negative emotions personally and stepping away.

      Here we see Bromwyn being very self-aware in the ways that she is interacting with her student Abraham.