553 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. marginalia as a medium of communication, not just with ourselves or the author, but with another reader, should we pass on the book we’ve made marks in
  2. Jun 2021
    1. Christopher R. Rogers

      Thank you, Chris, for joining our partner author webinar! We'll embed a link to our conversation with Chris once the video broadcasts live.

    2. Editors’ Introduction

      Welcome to the 2021 Marginal Syllabus. This Editors' Introduction is part of the third Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), with support from Hypothesis.

      Click "Show replies," below, to read more about the Marginal Syllabus.

  3. May 2021
    1. Both teachers valued students’ perspectives and encouraged their responses but, in both cases, guided them toward a shared ethical position: Anthony, toward consensus on literature; Ella, toward consensus on language.

      What a challenging and incisive observation. Amidst much discourse - and broad support for - "student voice," this study shows that educators can both value student perspectives and simultaneously constrain through consensus the challenges of discussion because of race talk dilemmas. There's a lot to unpack here about agency, voice, and power in the classroom.

    2. This study is intended to add to these bodies of literature, focusing on race talk dilem-mas as opportunities for students and teachers alike to grapple with issues of race in US society while also recognizing that those same dilemmas may derail teaching and learning.

      The relevance of this article rings so very true today. What opportunities for learners' productive struggle with race talk dilemmas have occurred in literature classes during this disrupted academic year?

  4. Apr 2021
    1. “We Always Talk About Race”

      Welcome to the 2021 Marginal Syllabus. This article by Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas is part of the third Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), with support from Hypothesis.

      Click "Show replies," below, to read more about the Marginal Syllabus.

    1. verall,thesocial-mediaaestheticsofGeniusthatareakintoFacebookorInstagramprovedtobethestrongestenticementforgettingstudentsonboardwithlearningnewdigitaltools

      ok, but this is a really terrible reason to adopt a learning technology

    2. Itistruethatstudentscansimplycreateanaccountusingapseudonymiftheywishtohavemoreprivacy,butaddingafeaturewhereinstructorscanlockdownallstudentannotationsfrompublicviewwouldbebeneficial

      all snark aside - this is a throw-away paragraph - don't focus on tool features, talk about composition practices. this has been one of the notable limitations of this article aside from the research design/survey methods - there's too much focus on Genius (all tools have their advantages and disadvantages, H included) and not enough deep discussion of learning practices. as a composition instructor reading this article, am I learning more about a tool or pedagogy and student learning?

    3. Assuch,IhopetoseeatoolakintoGeniusthatiscreatedspecificallywitheducationinmindinthefuture.

      i'm sorry what?! just use H or even Perusall, c'mon, how did this get through peer review?!

    4. thereisaneedforbettertoolsthataregearedspecificallytowardseducation

      indeed!

    5. TheannotationsthatIaskedstudentstocompleteultimatelyprovidedasafespaceoutsideoftheclassroomforactiveengagementandparticipation.

      what?! this is both speculative and kind of an absurd statement

    6. Studentsalsoreportedthattheyenjoyedbeingabletoreadtheirpeers’ideasbeforeclassdiscussions,andthattheycametoclassmorepreparedtointerpretourprimarytexts

      yes indeed, put this insight into complementary conversation with supporting lit

    7. Fromcollectedsurveys,IfoundthatGeniussucceededinmotivatingthemajorityofstudentstoreadtextscloser

      i've got a bone to pick here - Genius didn't succeed - students may have perceived the tool as valuable/useful in motivating a particular reading or writing practice - focus on student perceptions of their learning practices with SA, not the "success" of a tool

    8. istoosmalltodrawbroadconclusions,

      tell us this in the methods and put your sample size into conversation with/comparison to other studies of SA that also measured student perception - as we did in Kalir et al 2020.

    9. Intherecentpast,scholarshaveproducedanastonishingamountofresearchabouttechnologyintheclassroom.

      word to the wise - this is a throw-away sentence. what is this sentence accomplishing? we know this.

    10. IfIweretouseGeniusagaininmyclassroom,Iwouldencouragestudentstotryannotatingusingbothmethodologiesandthenaskthemtoreflectonthisprocess

      again, great reflection - why is this in the results?

    11. Iintroducedannotationsasanentry-pointintoourtexts.Studentswereencouragedtowritedownwhattheynoticedandwhatinterestedthem,tobringinsources,todiscusstheirthoughtswithothers,andtoultimatelyusetheseinsightstohelpcreateanargumentfortheiressays.Usingdigitalannotationthushelpsstudentstothinkofclosereadingasgatheringdatathattheycanconsolidatelaterwithintheirlong-formwriting.

      this is a nice educator reflection - i really like it - just not sure why it's in the results section of this paper - should be in the discussion

    12. couldbeginbymandatingacertainlevelofdiscussion

      ugh, this is the tension, right?

    13. Togetthefulleffectsofcollaboration

      what does this even mean?

    14. Unfortunately,thequalitativeresponsesabovesuggestthatstudentswillneedmorestructureddiscussionrequirementsforannotationhomework.

      indeed, and there are a lot of rubrics and models for productive discussion circulating among various social annotation communities, certainly among H users. we also cite/link to one such rubric in Kalir et al 2020

    15. Aftereachofthesequestions,studentswerealsoencouragedtoexplaintheirreasoningwithqualitativestatements.

      this should be explained in the methods section ie instrument design - this is sloppy - at the least, a peer reviewer attentive to methods should have encouraged this reorg

    16. Doyouseeannotationsoftwareasausefultoolforreadingandwriting?

      so these were y/n with opportunity to explain why... this instrument design is not transparent and hard to connect with the reported results below. i had to go back-and-forth a few times to see how the pie charts (terrible visuals!) aligned with the survey items

    17. IcontendthatitwasinpartbecauseIincorporatedthesedigitaltoolsintolow-stakesassignmentsfirstsothatstudentscouldlearntousethemwithoutfearinganyhiccupswoulddrasticallyaffecttheirgrade

      this certainly echoes my experience and is why i start with syllabus annotation activities every semester

    18. 3questions

      the fact that the open-ended responses are the only questions that ask about annotation is problematic - what can be gleaned from the likert items specific to annotation? research design limitation

    19. ncorporatingdigitalmediaandwritingmakesiteasiertocommunicatemyideas

      what is "digital media and writing" as a construct to examine (measure) through these survey questions? too broad and not focused on SA, this is a drawback

    20. Thisstudent’svalidconcernisalsoconsistentwithotherrecentstudies,whichstatethatstudentsmaystilllacktheskillstousetechnologyproductivelyeventhoughaccesstotechnologyhasincreasedexponentially

      the concern is certainly valid, though i'm not sure it's about technical skill and more about the socialization of "academic" writing - there's a nice resonance/tension here to the "everyday" writing that was previously by Yancey and colleagues

    21. qualitativeresponses

      open-ended responses and qual data paired with likert items does not make this a mixed methods study

    22. Inbothofthesequestions,nostudentsstronglydisagreedwiththesestatements.

      this is a writing convention thing, just give me a single table rather than all these pie charts and narrative - condense this

    23. responsetoeachofthesequestions

      OK, there are a number of key methodological decisions we need to discuss re a student perception survey, all of which informed the work reported in Kalir et al (2020):

      • survey items come from established constructs
      • survey must include reliable measures
      • what are results/limitations of other SA studies that use student perceptions surveys
      • make the instrument available for others to use

      GAH!!!!

    24. Inthefollowingsection

      wait what...? that's it with info about the survey instrument! OK FULL STOP.

      How do we trust this survey? are these reliable measures? READ KALIR ET AL 2020 METHODS SECTION

    25. 6statementsaboutusingdigitalmediaintheirwritingpractice,whichtheyrespondedtoviaaLikertscale(stronglyagree,agree,disagree,stronglydisagree).

      ok, here we go... how were these items created? based on what constructs?

    26. hisstudentaddedanewdimensiontoourclassdiscussions

      these are some nice anecdotes, descriptive and useful to help a reader understand social annotation in practice

    27. atleast2annotationspernight

      this seems pretty scripted

    28. thoughitisnotcurrentlyabletobeintegratedintoacoursemanagementsitelikeBlackboard

      touche

    29. Thecoursewebsitewithinthisstudywascustom-madeandwritteninHTML,butGeniuswouldworkwellwithanywebsitebuilder,includingsitessuchasWordPress,Wix,andSquarespace.

      so much work! just use a LMS and pipe in Hypothesis - ensures student privacy, too... this approach seems a bit outdated and a rather heavy lift for instructors

    30. toannotateourtextsinlowstakesweeklyassignments,replacingthetraditionalreadingresponsesIhaveassignedinthepast.Aswesawabove,annotationplatformsareuniquelysuitedforintroducingstudentstonewtechniquesforreadingandwriting.Whenstudentsareaskedtocommentonatext,Ihopedthattheactofannotatingwouldencouragethemtoslowdownthroughoutthereadingprocessandtonoticespecificdetailsratherthanreadingonlyforplotandcomprehension.Perhapsmostimportantly,IalsohopedthatusingGeniuswouldcreatemoredynamicdiscussions—studentswouldbeabletocollaborateoutsideoftheclassroomsothatourin-classdiscussionscouldbemoreholisticandinclusive.

      this is my favorite part of the article so far - a clear pedagogical rationale for the use of social annotation aligned with intention to support students' peer-to-peer learning and textual analysis as a collaborative activity

    31. Tomyknowledge,thereisnotcurrentlyatoolasaccessibleandattractive,whichalsoaddressestheprivacyconcernsoutlinedabove.

      to my knowledge you could just use H... and I'm getting snarky, because I'm biased. O'Dell really should have cited a few assessments of educational features of social annotation platforms as with:

      • Seatter, L. (2019). Towards Open Annotation: Examples and Experiments. KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies, 3(1), 12. https://doi.org/10.5334/kula.49
    32. primarilybecauseitisaccessibleforstudents,itusesanattractivealignedinterface,anditsdesignencouragesstudentstocollaborativelydeveloptextualinterpretations.

      And H doesn't do this better? i'm really confused by this choice

    33. Recentstudiesinthefieldhavecalledforinstructorstobemoremindfulofprivacyconcernsforourstudentsaswecontinuetointegratenewtechnologyintotheclassroom.

      so why not mention private group affordances of Hypothesis.... ugh

    34. thatprojectwasultimatelyscrapped.

      what happened?

    35. Whiletheyatonepointdevelopedaprojectcalled‘EducationGenius’,

      this should really read, "While Jeremy Dean at one point developed a project called 'Education Genius'..."

    36. andstudentannotationscanbereadbyanyonethathastheHypothes.isorGeniusbrowserandisloggedintotheirHypothes.isorGeniusaccounts

      no, and this is really a disservice - to not mention private group annotations suggests public ("read by anyone") is a default - this is sloppy

    37. Hypothes.isandGeniusaresimilarintermsofdesignandannotationformat

      no, not really > jeremy, where are you?!

    38. Inher2008study,Wolfearguesthatthebiggestissuefacingannotationsoftwaredesignisdecidingwheretopositiontheannotationsinrelationtotheprimarytext

      i appreciate that she's leaning heavily on Wolfe (2008) but it's a bit outdated at this point... there's more useful lit to cite at this point

    39. amixedmethodssurvey

      no! AHHHHHH!!!!!!

    40. usedamixedmethodsapproachbyaskingstudentstoanswerLikertScalequestionsaswellasshortresponsequestions

      that does't make a study mixed methods. qual and quant data from a single source does not mean mixed methods

    41. helpedmetodevelopmyownsurveyinstrument,whichfocusedonstudentperceptionsandexperience.

      developed how? reliable measure? and do we get access to the instrument?

    42. CengageLearning

      ugh

    43. Imagine,forexample,thatstudentscouldevenhaveaccesstoarecordofpreviousstudentannotationsoncourseprimarytexts

      i don't need to imagine this... there's a lot missing from these paragraphs, unfortunately, to better describe and substantiate these claims

    44. hisfocusoncollaborationandinteractivityisinmanywaysthecornerstoneofannotationresearch

      yeah, agreed - i could recommend some cites that actually concern annotation as collaborative learning ;)

    45. couldsimilarlyprovideinstructorswithaconvenientwayofgivingmoreextensiveandmorepersonalfeedback

      yeah, we discuss this in Hollett & Kalir (2017)

    46. WhilethisstudyprimarilyexaminesplatformsliketrackchangesinMicrosoftWord,GoogleDocs,andCanvas

      yeah, that study isn't about annotation!

    47. doesnotsplitthereader’sattention

      the affordances of proximity, that discussion is "anchored" in text as a discursive context

    48. theactofhighlighting

      highlight, as a sole annotation practice, has pretty limited learning benefits

    49. Ratherthanacommunalpractice,annotationbecamemoreofasolitaryeffortinwhichindividualswriteonthesinglecopythattheythemselvesown

      not necessarily - Jackson details many examples of readers annotating and then sharing their books - literally passing marked up copies around at fancy dinner parties - the parallel to contemporary social media practices is obvious

    50. Inthemedievalperiod,themarginsofatextwereoftencommunal,inwhichanindividualcoulddiscussatext,askquestions,glossimportantterms,andlearnfrompreviousreaders.

      as many, like me, argue, annotation has often been social for centuries

    51. Thisrequiresstudentstorecognizepatterns,literarydevices,andstructure—andthisispreciselywheredigitalannotationsoftwarecomesintoplay

      agreed, yes

    52. 3)thatdespitetheextensivebenefitstopublic-facingwriting,usingdigitalresourcescanalsoraisequestionsofprivacyandaudience

      sure

    53. Throughmyownnotesasinstructorofthesefivecourses

      secondary data source

    54. ThroughanonymousstudentsurveysfromfiveCornellwritingclasses

      prominent (only?) data source, important to study design and methods

    55. aneasy-to-usetoolthatallowsstudentstobothdevelopgoodeditingpracticesandtocollaborativelygenerateconversationinandoutsideoftheclassroom

      ugh... educators aren't using Genius - talk to Jeremy about that ;)

    56. Genius

      goodness, this will be fun

    57. adigitalannotationsoftware

      "social annotation" is pretty established as a term... anyway

    58. Thismixed-methodsstudy

      very curious about what this means

    59. Forstudents,allthreeoftheseissuesarenowwrappedupindigitalmediaandsocialnetworking,whichfunctionasvirtualspacesinwhichreaderscanbecomeusers,authors,andaudienceallatthesametime

      yup, sharp

    1. writing itself more broadly, as a practice and an object of study, cannot be fully and accurately represented until and unless it includes everyday writing, which is perhaps our most common kind of writing, the writing that consistently mediates life, from day to day.

      scholars of so-called "informal" learning can certainly help to represent this type of everyday writing

    2. The results are twofold. First, there is the loss of articulated and related scholarship on everyday writing itself: a field with multiple scenes has yet to cohere.

      hmmmm... ok...

    3. he everyday writing of different annotators demonstrates how solitary writing becomes communal and intertexual, linked to other contexts and to other readers as well as to the future.

      yeah... i'm finding myself a bit disappointed in this as the key conclusive takeaway from an analysis about annotation

    4. was sustained throughout by ongoing circulation of small, everyday acts of writing via the pro-testers’ social media across many platforms (e.g., Tumblr, Reddit, and Facebook), most notably Twitter

      i find this analysis very thin and wonder why Tufekci's seminal book wasn't the entire anchor for this section - seems like a gimme, big opportunity missed here

    5. tweets

      surprised there isn't a discussion of Twitter as annotation. The literary critic Sam Anderson observed, a decade ago, that “Twitter is basically electronic marginalia on everything in the world: jokes, sports, revolutions.”

    6. of access and spread

      wondering about reference to Tufekci's Twitter and Teargas...

    7. TIME, in anointing “The Protester” the 2011 Person of the Year

      a decade ago... and yet "the protestor" was often not publicly celebrated ("anointed") in the same way following BLM protests in the wake of the murders of Taylor, Floyd, McClain...

    8. the advent of social media

      again, very surprised this is coming so deep into the article

    9. how everyday writing can help us see seemingly solitary, material acts like reading as more intertextual and thus social acts:

      yes yes yes

    10. signifies a reading-writer taking ownership of the text

      yet in the case of a library book, that ownership is fleeting... we wouldn't argue that someone writing graffiti on a public wall - or a monument! - is taking ownership of the "text" (the wall, the statue). in those cases, they are establishing via annotation some form of presence, they may be writing/contributing to a counter-narrative, or they may be publicly marking as an indication of "reader response" (broadly defined)... but "taking ownership" seems too definitive to me especially if we're trying to make sense of annotation beyond the confines of a (cook)book

    11. as they write the book into unique in-tertextual networks.

      hmmm.... there's a lot to unpack here.

    12. enacts and exemplifies a kind of Bakhtinian dialogism

      this is buried way, way too deep (per my annotation above). why foreground Witte's framework without a complementary discussion of heteroglossia, dialogism, and intertextuality?

    13. ecome a choral writing marking what is im-portant in different situations and for different people.

      this is really good, and a jump into digital margins with social annotation would make this analysis richer in my assessment

    14. and conversing with the author

      FYI that Jackson explicitly takes the stance that annotation is not a conversation with the author: "Writing marginalia is not so much akin to conversation or collaboration or correspondence as it is to talking back to the TV set—and readers like it that way.” I have a slightly different take on social annotation, especially because in some cases (though not many) an annotator might actually be in discussion with the author. Developments in open peer review are a great example of this. And Antero and I are really trying to blur the line of talking with/about/through the text (and the author) with our book.

    15. s Jackson observes, the annotated comments and symbols

      gah... Jackson certainly mentions symbols, but she doesn't study them. here's my copy of Jackson p. 14:

    16. s/he indicates where his/her

      not only does this read awkwardly, it's a 2020 pub! this pronoun use is driving me crazy

    17. ave also written back to hooks’s ideas,

      big point here: yancey and colleagues have yet to introduce notions of reader response in their discussion of annotation. and theories of reader response are certainly not specific to ed studies, given all the debates in the 70s and 80s (Fish, etc).

    18. an asterisk, exclamation point, or line (Marginalia 13)—much like the ones in Teaching to Transgress.

      but she doesn't actually study these! which makes the jump to similar symbols in our digitally saturated lives (as with reactions/emoji on social media) harder to establish

    19. H. L. Jackson, author of Marginalia, the authoritative volume addressing marginalia by the famous and less famous, explains the generic context of annotations.

      absolutely an authoritative volume, though maybe not "the"... Jackson was very clear about bounding her analysis by time (from 1700 into the very beginning of the twentieth century) and also by what counts in her assessment as "marginalia" - the gloss, rubric, and scholium. Antero and I review Jackson in detail in our book, and i think it's important to qualify her stance before naming the book "the authoritative volume"

    20. his/her

      why wasn't "their" used?

    21. making the annotated book a unique text

      huh? this is both obvious (to me) and also kind of irrelevant

    22. a composer takes ownership of a text:

      i don't know... i often think of myself as a visitor, rather than as a citizen, when annotating a text - especially is there is an explicit social context (and certainly public accessibility) to the addition of notes

    23. writers conversing with books, with others who have read those books, and with future selves who will make use of those books

      yeah, this is a common observation about annotation - i've certainly written like this/noted these dynamics before

    24. unior Service League of Panama City’s 1977

      this is kind of interesting... any discussion of what was happening in Panama in the 1970s?

    25. left by one or more of the sixty-seven or so readers who checked out Teaching to Transgress from this university’s library (Scheel).

      ah interesting... used "textbooks" - that's the focus of Marshall's seminal 1997 study on annotation - she camped out in a university book store for four days and just documented annotation like this - her methods, though, were a bit more transparent and systemic (in my reading!)

    26. bell hooks’s Teaching to Transgress

      i annotated this in college, for sure, so again, why this book?

    27. socialize

      curious what this means

    28. (2) illustrate tacit knowledges and connect old understandings to new ones

      this is great

    29. 1) make a text one’s own

      marks of ownership and provenance are well-documented via annotation in medieval manuscripts

    30. rom both stretch outwards.

      as they would, annotation establishes "associative trails" according to Bush (1945)

    31. both lifewide2 and lifelong

      these are very different concepts in the learning sciences, see Banks et al LIFE report from early 2000s

    32. this text whispers of the everyday.

      whispers? empirically i'm not sure what this term accomplishes. and figuratively... doesn't the notebook kind of shout the everyday? or at least consistently document?

    33. by a white working-class woman with an eighth-grade education, Bessie Dominick Suber, the notebook poorly preserved and inscribed with dates ranging from December 19, 1964, to November 4, 1979.

      now that we know this detail, i'm even more confused about the selection criteria for this scene - why this notebook, why her... i think i've got a beef more with the acceptable methods of the field then i do with yancey and colleagues, anyway...

    34. in-tertextual palimpsest u

      so annotation?

    35. not on both

      this is where my growing interest in annotation might work to help bridge the writing of social texts and discourses across digital/analog settings... i think the role of social media has helped erase much of this presumed divide - people carry their digital discourses wherever they move, we are tethered to and participating in "digital" discourses when standing in a park during a protest, and our in situ photographs of protestors (and their signs) are shared and circulated via social media (often a form of social annotation)... anyway, ramble over

    36. all in order to demon-strate the ways a schema of text/context/intertext can elucidate specific texts and document them as instances of the category of everyday writ-ing itself.

      i get that Witte provides the conceptual framework anchoring this study, and i now understand a bit more clearly about the selection criteria for the three scenes (though i can't shake the sense that three examples were selected because they were useful illustrative examples to prove the point), but i'm still not clear on how the examples will be "examined, analyzed, and interpreted"...? in many ed studies, the methods section will provide a model excerpt/sample of data and show (rather than tell) how specific analytic moves (as with coding, or some type of computational process) makes a viable claim that is empirically substantiated as a "finding" or a "result"

    37. the second showing the re-writing of reading

      that's a nice way of characterizing annotation

    38. What do we learn about the texts of everyday writing, both in its particularities and as a broader phenomenon, from examining, analyz-ing, and interpreting them, especially through the Witte framework?

      i'm reading this as a more empirically-grounded research question

    39. the social and rhetorical environment within which cognitive habits, goals, assumptions, and values are shared by partici-pants who employ common discourse strategies for commu-nicating and practicing these cognitive habits, goals, assump-tions, and values.

      this has nice resonance with various ed theories popular in the learning sciences that emphasize the social and collaborative qualities of learning, the importance of broader social (and political) discourse, and an emphasis on learning as participation in various shared activities - ie learning is a social accomplishment

    40. the second scene includes annotations operating at the in-tersection of the private and the public;

      curious!

    41. we turn to three very different scenes of everyday writing,

      having reviewed both related lit and theory (that's how I would categorize the first two "movements" of this article), i'm very curious about the empirical qualities of this next section... first question, perhaps to be answered soon: how were these three "scenes" identified for inclusion and analysis? this is what ed researchers would call "selection criteria"

    42. to define everydaywriting as a self-sponsored, purposeful, enactive composing growing out of and in response to the private and public exigencies of every-day life.

      this is a great definition and purpose, and can be useful in guiding empirical aspects of our study (and certainly other ed studies more broadly)

    43. an intertext is “something akin to a writer’s representation of the situated ‘other,’ or the ‘social’” (289).

      maybe we should read Bakhtin

    44. context is “something akin to a writer’s representation of the externally situated or pro-jected ‘self ’” (289

      hmmmm... interesting framing of context.

    45. can be both ordinary and extraordinary;

      from whose gaze? under what contexts of analysis? and how do these qualities shift over time?

    46. and civic writing

      so much emphasis on "civic writing" in ed, particularly among researchers who ascribe to an understanding of "connected learning." we ran an entire marginal syllabus (2017-18) about "writing our civic futures," and there's a lot of youth-oriented studies of civic writing (often via social media). not to mention all the research on mobile learning that also broadly accounts for "civic writing" (like youth writing their cities through mapping activities, thinking about Katie Taylor's research, Nate Phillips, etc)

    47. Lauren Resnick

      a giant in ed research, wonderful to see her cited here

    48. “notion of literacy practices,

      this is great - a direct bridge to literacy ed theory, research, and an understanding of practices

    49. monumental writing,

      i've also been thinking about "monumental" writing a bit lately, too, though in the sense of actual monuments, and the types of social reading and annotation practices afforded by such public artifacts. case in point - a recent little adventure i had editing wikipedia.

    50. articipate in the same ecology

      i'm reminded of Piper's emphasis on reading as an "ecosystem" of meaning and that is it "our ability to layer--or more artisanally understood, to weave--different modes of communication with one another to give those same words a deeper, more profound meaning.” as for "ecology," that terms carries very different theoretical implications in the learning sciences as learners move across the settings of a "learning ecology" or make use of the relations and resources present in a "social learning ecology" to pursue their interests and participate in consequential learning activities (often outside of school)

    51. “handwritten signs placed at bus stops encouraging African Americans not to ride the buses” (200),

      this is one type of annotation i'm increasingly interested in - the note (handwritten sign) added to a text (bus stop) which is something that people collectively read (while waiting for the bus) and that also speaks to broader "texts" and discourses, in this case the bus boycott/civic rights/racial justice (also connected to paratext)

    52. Framed as the writing of the extracurriculum, this everyday writing is viewed in re-lationship to the school curriculum and is thus largely valued for its self-sponsorship of both composing and instruction

      thinking of social media, as an "extracurriculum" in relationship to - often in tension with - formal schooling, and the various types of everyday writing (much of which is multimodal) that thrive on social media platforms

    53. A central characteristic of these approaches to everyday writing is their attention to the mundane, ubiquitous writing practices of the non-elite, the marginalized, and the invisible; they also trace resistance and power as exercised in such writing.

      wonderful

    54. can help scholars

      why only scholars? shouldn't third graders understand, appreciate, and know how to "account for" the importance of their everyday writing, especially outside of formal school contexts?

    55. such models and theories are necessarily incomplete

      i certainly agree with that!

    56. separated by time, material, and context

      why? this is an odd emphasis for me, at least when foregrounding the importance of annotation. annotations are anchored. they are attached to the text. and context really, really matters in order to read and make sense of the note added (not separated) from the text

    57. commonplace in daily life, and yet not fully recognized as a legitimate area of study.

      the learning sciences would like to have a word. there's been much study over the decades about so-called "informal" learning, including the literacies that comprise "everyday writing" as consequential to learning (the New London Group's 1996 seminal piece is one such anchor text). plus the work of media scholars, like Henry Jenkins, also comes to mind.

    58. a man crafts captions for the photos he posts on Facebook

      definitely annotation, so much of social media and the daily habits of "engagement" are just notes added to texts ad infinitum

    59. bring hand-made signs and placards to a meeting with their Congressional representative

      not sure this is annotation, unless we think of "text" from a post-structural perspective. i have been really interested recently in how public writing/reading becomes annotation, as with signs that are attached to public spaces (fences, buildings) and as with graffiti. anyway, there's important overlap between social reading and annotation, though the practices are distinct

    60. annotates her favorite cookbook

      yes, annotation, a note added to a text

  5. Mar 2021
    1. Revealing the Human and the Writer:

      Welcome to the 2021 Marginal Syllabus. This article by Dr. Latrise Johnson and Dr. Hannah Sullivan (congrats on your recent and successful doctoral defense!) is part of the third Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), with support from Hypothesis.

      Click "Show replies," below, to read more about the Marginal Syllabus.

    2. . It is important that teachers acknowledge and invite students to write themselves into teaching/learning land-scapes that reflect their identities, histories, cultures, and values.

      We just wrapped up recording our webinar discussion with Latrise, and I shared this quote as one of my lasting takeaways. I'm curious: As an educator, what strategies do you use to invite students to write themselves into their learning landscapes?

    3. literacy counterpublics, “spaces in which written texts are central to the engagement of social practices

      How, if at all, might the margins of (digital) texts function as a literacy counterpublic, a space that enables writers to challenge authority through the social practice of annotation?

    4. Everett’s (2016) work with high school students, where one Black male used metaphor to interrogate his schooling experiences.

      A related article by Sakeena Everett is her 2018 study "'Untold Stories': Cultivating Consequential Writing with a Black Male Student through a Critical Approach to Metaphor," that also appeared in RTE and was featured in the 2019-2020 Marginal Syllabus.

  6. Feb 2021
    1. which explains that Google’s algorithms reflect the racialized and genderedbiases of the programmers rather than providing a level playing field for all ideas, values, and identities.

      Another excellent text resonant with both Tamika's critique and Noble's book is Ruha Benjamin's Race After Technology. The book's first chapter, for example, details the automation of anti-Blackness and the intentional engineering of inequity that produces--in returning to Tamika's case--the racialized invisibility of Black dancers. And there's a powerful pedagogical implication here, too, given the ease with which Google Images has become the default archive used to support multimodal teaching and learning activities. As educators guide students to search via Google Images when making a digital collage or dream board, do educators also guide complementary discussion about what images appear, what images are excluded, and why?

    2. For teachers to acknowledge all the ways Black girls learn and communicate information, they must first come to understand these varied forms of literacy that exist outside of hegemonic narratives of who is literate and what constitutes literacy.

      This necessary "call to action" echoes the scholarship and advocacy of Dr. April Baker-Bell (a previous Marginal Syllabus partner author) whose recent book Linguistic Justice introduces and argues for an Antiracist Black Language Pedagogy that "must 1) center blackness; 2) confront white linguistic and cultural hegemony; and 3) contest anti-blackness."

    3. Brown Girls Dreaming:

      This article is shared openly as part of the 2021 Marginal Syllabus

      Anyone is welcome to publicly annotate this text and share annotations that spark conversation and deepen collective inquiry. In doing so, please consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy. Also, please remember that discussing educational equity may be a challenging and new experience for some people.

      We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    4. Brown Girls Dreaming:

      Welcome to the 2021 Marginal Syllabus. This article by Dr. Turner and Dr. Griffin is part of the third Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), with support from Hypothesis.

      Click "Show replies," below, to read more about the Marginal Syllabus.

  7. Jan 2021
  8. Nov 2020
    1. JErEMIAh (rEMI) KALIr

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. “A Talk to Teachers”

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. Why

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. This post was written by NCTE member Cody Miller.

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

  9. Sep 2020
    1. Black Lives Matter at School Week
    2. their preparation and passion to do the work that demonstrates Black lives matter may be met with resistance

      And that they may also face similar resistance once teaching in their own classrooms. Case in point - this summer, my students (most of whom are either educators or school leaders) and I discussed the pedagogy and advocacy of Zakia Jarrett in this report "Teacher Calls For Anti-Racism Curriculum After She Was Put On Leave Over Remarks On Police Violence." Supporting pre-service teachers to develop strategies to manage such resistance is needed!

    3. Do 1, Watch/Listen 2, Read/Explore 3: A Protocol For Individual Anti-Racism Work

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. “Thereis a Balmin Gilead”:

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. learning is listening to “the space between the quotes.” an experiment in imagining just worlds in education

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. Critical race parenting in the Trump era: a Sisyphean endeavor? A parable

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. 2

      Hey 7712 - Please note this is the PUBLIC layer and you'll want to jump into our private course group for our annotation conversation.

    1. Overview

      Hey 7712 - Please note this is the PUBLIC layer and you'll want to jump into our private course group for our annotation conversation.

  10. Aug 2020
    1. Cognitive

      Hey 7712 - Please note this is the PUBLIC layer. Our course will be annotating via a private group. When you click Public, above, you'll be to select our private group - and it's on that private layer where you'll then see annotations from me and your peers.

    1. How

      Hey 7712 - Please note this is the PUBLIC layer. Our course will be annotating via a private group. When you click Public, above, you'll be to select our private group - and it's on that private layer where you'll then see annotations from me and your peers.

    1. The Philosophical

      Welcome to our course's social annotation and discussion of Mack (2010). Please note that this annotation has been added to the Public layer; you'll see "Public" in the top left corder of the Hypothesis sidebar above.

      Our course will be annotating via a private group. When you click Public, above, you'll be to select our private group - and it's on that private layer where you'll then see annotations from me and your peers. Questions? Please ask via Slack.

    1. 2

      Welcome to our course's social annotation and discussion of Alvesson and Sköldberg (2017). Please note that this annotation has been added to the Public layer; you'll see "Public" in the top left corder of the Hypothesis sidebar above.

      Our course will be annotating via a private group. When you click Public, above, you'll be to select our private group - and it's on that private layer where you'll then see annotations from me and your peers. Questions? Please ask via Slack.

    1. Learning

      Welcome to our course's social annotation and discussion of Derry and Steinkuehler. Please note that this annotation has been added to the Public layer; you'll see "Public" in the top left corder of the Hypothesis sidebar above.

      Our course will be annotating via a private group. When you click Public, above, you'll be to select our private group - and it's on that private layer where you'll then see annotations from me and your peers. Questions? Please ask via Slack.

  11. Jun 2020
  12. May 2020
    1. Sophia Tatiana Sarigianides

      Our thanks to partner author Sophia Sarigianides for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus! Dr. Sarigianides' bio is included at the end of this article.

    2. Performative Youth

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our May conversation! This is the seventh article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

  13. Apr 2020
    1. 10 millionth annotation

      indeed, we're on this journey together

      congrats, team

      you've already made a lasting difference in the lives of countless students and educators

      here's to 10 million more

    1. limn

      Antero Garcia and I have authored a book about annotation titled "Annotation" that is forthcoming from the MIT Press. We reference this speech by Morrison in the beginning of our chapter that examines the ways in which annotation provides information. Here's the opening of that chapter:

      "In 1993, Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for 'novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import.' In her Nobel Lecture, she noted how language, whether spoken or written, can limn, or describe and detail, life. Derived from the Latin illuminare, meaning to 'make light' or 'illuminate,' limn has been used throughout literary history to generally describe—and convey the literal illustration of—a manuscript. One affordance of annotation is that it enables readers and writers to limn, or describe, their texts. In doing so, how does such annotation provide information?"

    2. Toni Morrison Nobel Lecture

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. How Long is Never?

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. On the History (and Future) of YA and Speculative Fiction by Black Women

      If you are joining an annotation conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    1. Marginal Syllabus

      The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

      The 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus is titled "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN" and was co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis.

    2. a long history of people scribbling in the margins of books
    3. new book

      forthcoming in early 2021 from the MIT Press

    4. friend and colleague

      thanks, Matt!

    5. paradigm

      paradigm shift?

    1. Ashley s.boyd■jAcindAmille

      Our thanks to partner authors Ashley Boyd and Jacinda Miller for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus!

    2. Classroom

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our April conversation! This is the sixth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

  14. Mar 2020
    1. California Common Core State Stan-dards and California English Language Development Standards.

      important that this youth-led participatory action research was aligned with and supported by more formal curricular standards (state, federal)

  15. Feb 2020
    1. “Untold Stories”:

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    2. Sakeena Everett

      Our thanks to partner author Dr. Sakeena Everett for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus! This is the second time that Dr. Everett has joined the Marginal Syllabus as a partner author, having previously done so during the 2017-18 Writing Our Civic Futures syllabus - please also read her co-authored article, and the associated annotation conversation, about pedagogies of healing and critical media literacy. Dr. Everett's bio also appears at the end of this article.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our March conversation! This is the fifth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

  16. Jan 2020
    1. Vaughn W. M. Watson Michigan State UniversityAlecia Beymer Michigan State University

      Our thanks to partner authors Vaughn W. M. Watson and Alecia Beymer for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus! Brief bios for each partner author are included at the end of the article

    2. Praisesongs of Place

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our February conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.