336 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
    1. 102English Journal 107.6 (2018): 102–108Jemimah L. Young, Marquita D. Foster, and Dorothy Hines

      Our thanks to partner authors Jemimah Young, Marquita Foster, and Dorothy Hines for contributing to the 2018-19 LEARN Marginal Syllabus! Bios for each partner author are included at the end of this article.

    2. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

  2. sciencefeedback.co sciencefeedback.co
    1. We invite scientists with relevant expertise to comment on media articles that contain science-based information, adding contextual information and highlighting factual inaccuracies and faulty reasoning where they exist.
  3. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Baker-Doyle, K. J.

      Thank you Kira Baker-Doyle! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our fourth conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  4. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology & Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. West-Puckett, S., Smith, A., Cantrill, C., &Zamora, M.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our third conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  5. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Hsieh, B.

      Thank you Betina Hsieh! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our second conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  6. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Watulak, S. L., Woodard, R., Smith, A., Johnson, L., Phillips, N., & Wargo, K.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our first conversation! This is the first article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

    1. create identifiable usernames. FirstLastName is a good example

      I wouldn't call this a "best practice," especially if students are going to transition from course-based use of Hypothesis to social annotation on the open web. Not everyone wants to be identified online and anonymity is important, especially for students from nondominant groups. I give my students a choice about their H usernames:

      1. entirely anonymous, like banana1234
      2. somewhat pseudonymous like john1234
      3. attributed like remikalir (my username) It's easy enough to create a private list only accessible within a course that matches usernames to real identities (share it as a googledoc or post it to the LMS). Ultimately, I want students to use H for learning in a course context and then transition to annotating the open web once they are no longer enrolled in my course or at my university. In order to more respectfully and safely guide this transition, I think a "better" practice is to give students options about anonymity and attribution.
    1. Everardo Pedraza and R. Joseph Rodríguez

      Our thanks to partner authors Everardo Pedraza and Joseph Rodriguez for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short bio of each author is included at the end of this article. And a Connected Learning TV webinar with both partner authors, and regular Marginal Syllabus participants, will go live on Tuesday, May 7th (and will be included in this annotation, too).

    2. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  7. Apr 2019
    1. For people interested in tracking analytics associated with the collaborative reading of this report, click here to activate the "crowd layers" dashboard. The dashboard will provide real-time analytics on total annotators, annotations, types of annotations, tags, and more.

  8. Mar 2019
    1. Cultivating

      This open access version of "Cultivating urban literacies on Chicago's South Side through a pedagogy of spatial justice" is being publicly read, annotated, and discussed as a part of the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus. To learn more about this project and discussion, click Page Notes (above) to access additional information and linked resources.

    2. AndreAVaughan■rebeccA woodard■nAthAn c. phillips■kArAtaylor

      Our thanks to partner authors Andrea Vaughan, Rebecca Woodard, Nathan Phillips, and Kara Taylor for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! Additional biographical information about the authors is included at the end of this article. And a Connected Learning TV webinar featuring all the authors will be broadcast on Tuesday, April 2nd and also embedded in our annotation conversation, too.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our April conversation! This is the sixth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. UC

      Copyedit: Change to "CU" from "UC" (as the Colorado system distinguishes itself from California).

    2. in-schooland out-of-school practitioners

      Make these roles more explicit?

    3. Greetings everyone, I'm excited about CLX developing this connected learning guide! If you are participating in the feedback activities via Hypothesis annotation, and if you'd like to see analytics about the collaborative activity associated with this guide, please click here. This link will take you to the "crowd layers" dashboard, where you can view a summary of who is annotating, what types of annotations have been added, when annotations were written, if annotations are tagged, and more. I hope this is a useful tool that complements the broader feedback process.

    1. urrently has an edge

      Not to mention Hypothesis' efforts to establish an open annotation standard.

    2. Other Open Peer Review Systems

      Some commentary from Hypothesis' Heather Staines in this section would be most welcome…

    3. digital marginalia broke down as noted in Table 1

      I'm curious about the methodology used to categorize this annotation corpus, especially in light of the fact that Kalir & Dean (2018) would ultimately feature 120 annotations through January 7, 2018.

    4. 2016

      Our open access article was published in 2018 as: Kalir, J., & Dean, J. (2018). Web annotation as conversation and interruption. Journal of Media Practice, 19(1), 18-29.

    5. 24, or 38%

      120 annotations by 12 participants who conversed via 32 discursive threads over 20 days. Easily access analytics associated with the collaborative annotation activity of this experimental conversation using the "crowd layers" dashboard.

    6. open reviews and discourse

      And I hope Dr. Skains is welcoming of this post-publication review and discourse, given both the content and spirit of the article.

    7. a digital discourse occurring ona source text itself.

    8. a largely unsuccessful venture to this date

      One of the core points - and tensions - of this article. I'd like to see some broader debate about what counts as "success."

    9. Collaborative annotation and conversation atop this article can be followed using the "crowd layers" dashboard - click here.

    1. 24, or 38%, of which were concentrated on one projectspecifically experimenting with Hypothes.is web annotation

      120 annotations by 12 participants who conversed via 32 discursive threads over 20 days. Easily access analytics associated with the collaborative annotation activity of this experimental conversation using the "crowd layers" dashboard.

    2. open reviews and discourse

      And I hope Dr. Skains is welcoming of this post-publication review and discourse, given both the content and spirit of the article.

    3. into a digital discourse occurringona source text itself.

    4. a largely unsuccessful venture to this date

      One of the core points - and tensions - of this article. I'd like to see some broader debate about what counts as "success."

    5. Hypothes.is currently has an edge over similar annotation tools in terms of ubiquity, as it hasformed a coalition with over 60 academic institutions and presses to make use of its services(Dwhly, 2015)

      Not to mention Hypothesis' efforts to establish an open annotation standard.

    6. Other open peer review systems

      Some commentary from Hypothesis' Heather Staines in this section would be most welcome...

    7. The digital marginalia broke down as noted in Table 1, with most of thecomments (19 of 37) focused on specific revisions to particular segments, ranging from clar-ification of points to inclusion of additional resources

      I'm curious about the methodology used to categorize this annotation corpus, especially in light of the fact that Kalir & Dean (2018) would ultimately feature 120 annotations through January 7, 2018.

    8. Collaborative annotation and conversation atop this article can be followed using the "crowd layers" dashboard - click here!

    9. Kalir R and Dean J (2016)

      Kalir, J., & Dean, J. (2018). Web annotation as conversation and interruption. Journal of Media Practice, 19(1), 18-29.

    10. 2016

      Our open access article was published in 2018 as: Kalir, J., & Dean, J. (2018). Web annotation as conversation and interruption. Journal of Media Practice, 19(1), 18-29.

    1. Welcome OpenLearning19 participants! Curious about who has joined this annotation conversation, and how they've annotated this article? You're very welcome to click here and use the "crowd layers" dashboard to access open analytics about who has annotated this article, what types of annotation have been authored, how the conversation grows over time, and more. Hope this is a useful complement to the conversation!

    1. Are you curious about the collaborative annotation conversation atop this article? Click here and use the "crowd layers" dashboard to explore who has annotated this article, what types of annotation have been authored, how the conversation grows over time, and more. Hope this is a useful complement to the conversation.

    1. Curious about the collaborative annotation conversation atop this research article? Click here and use the "crowd layers" dashboard to explore who has annotated this article, what types of annotation have been authored, how the conversation grows over time, and more. Hope this is a useful complement to the conversation.

    1. Wow, very cool project. Hope you don't mind me jumping in here with a tool that this group might find useful. The "crowd layers" dashboard will provide real-time analytics related to the collaborative activity associated with this document. Click here to see who's annotating, how they're annotating, when, with what tags, and more. I hope this is useful!

    1. Language Arts Lessons

      This open access version of "Critical Indigenous Literacies: Selecting and Using Children's Books about Indigenous Peoples" is being publicly read, annotated, and discussed as a part of the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus. To learn more about this project and discussion, click Page Notes (above) to access additional information and linked resources.

    2. #OwnVoices

      Click here to read the latest tweets tagged #OwnVoices.

    3. American Indians in Children’s Liter-ature (https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com)

      "Established in 2006, American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL) provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children's and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society." Visit the site to read book reviews, Native media, and more.

    4. Debbie Reese

      Our thanks to partner author Debbie Reese for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short biography of Debbie Reese is included at the end of this article, and you can also learn more about her here.

    5. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    6. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our March conversation! This is the fifth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  9. Feb 2019
    1. These are only a few of the total, I'm sure

      As an educator, it's encouraging - in an odd sort of way - that formal schooling, the work of teaching, and (especially) K12 learning was not mentioned in this list given dominant narratives about technology replacing/improving the practices of teaching and learning.

    2. such that computer processes based upon these rules can be said to extract meaning from these statements and to do operations based upon this meaning.

      Given both recent research and highly publicized corporate missteps, is it not prudent to ask: What role does human bias play in designing the computer processes that extract meaning and perform operations?

    3. if you were being given a personal discussion-demonstration by a friendly fellow (named Joe)

      I thought it might be useful, at the outset of this section, to inquire about Engelbart's choices as an author. I'm struck by his decision to craft this expository and hypothetical description, to provide us readers with another set of entry points and scaffolds to better understand his prior arguments. Though the style and tenor is quite different, I'm reminded of Bernard Suits' book The Grasshopper that relied upon dialogue and extended analogy to rebut Wittgenstein's claims of "family resemblances." In any case, perhaps I'm most curious about unpacking authorial motivation and decision-making, for this section differs in so many ways from more conventional technical reports, literature reviews, or surveys of theory. This section may not have been necessary, but - presumably - it was included because it accomplished something the previous sections were unable to capture? Or is this "merely" for the purposes of exposition?

    4. maintain stoutly that a practical augmentation system should not require the human to have to do any computer programming—they feel that this is too specialized a capability to burden people with

      Jon Udell's conversation with Gardner Campbell touches upon this point, around minute 11. https://youtu.be/-lClojNraK4

    5. we very rarely go back to it in its original form

      I'm reminded of the Annotation for Transparent Inquiry project that is part of the Qualitative Data Repository.

    6. something like footnotes, only much more flexible

      Something, perhaps, like open annotation?

    7. Let us use what we call 'antecedent links'
    8. 'What's this?', 'How come?', and 'So what?'

      Oh, it's a dissertation defense.

    9. Golly, you could be writing math expressions, ad copy, or a poem, with the same type of benefit.

      Coming to this observation, as I read more deeply into this narrative, I'm curious about the generative tension between text (n) and text (v). How have others perceived, and perhaps also contributed to, the augmentation of text (n/v) - in terms of composition, editing, visualization...

    1. For #ELI2019 participants (and others) who join this annotation conversation, use this link to track analytics associated with your collaborative activity using the "crowd layers" dashboard.

    1. Londonderry

      Derry. This is a corner in Derry. Especially when showcasing this particular Bogside mural, this is Derry.

    1. Tanja BurkhardUniversity of PittsburghCarlotta PennThe Ohio State University

      Here's our Connected Learning TV webinar with partner authors Valerie Kinloch, Tanja Burkhard, and Carlotta Penn, also featuring regular Marginal Syllabus participants Michelle King and Cherise McBride - enjoy! https://youtu.be/XzK4jD3QaaY

    2. Valerie KinlochUniversity of Pittsburgh

      Our thanks to partner authors Valerie Kinloch, Tanja Burkhard, and Carlotta Penn for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A Connected Learning TV webinar featuring all three partner authors will be broadcast on Tuesday, Feb 5th, with the video also embedded here in our annotation conversation. Brief bios for all three partner authors are also included at the end of this article.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our February conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. Greetings NCTE working group! Curious about how your "crowd" of annotators adds a "layer" of conversation atop this document? The "crowd layers" public dashboard summarizes and visualizes annotations (by type), and provides additional information about text-participants, active days, tags, and more! To see collaborative activity associated with this document, click here.

  10. Jan 2019
    1. Kalir (in press)

      It's an honor to be cited by Maha and Autumm in their paper! This particular article was published at the end of 2018 as "Equity-oriented design in open education." Here's the journal's version as well as an open access preprint.

    2. Curious about who's been annotating this article, how, and when? Use the CROWDLAAERS ("crowd layers") dashboard to get real-time analytics associated with text-participants, total annotations and replies, collaborative threads, active days, and tags. This link will always show updated learning analytics associated with this conversation - enjoy!

    1. Are you curious about the collaborative annotation activity occurring atop Engelbart's conceptual framework? Use the CROWDLAAERS ("crowd layers") dashboard to view real-time analytics associated with text-participants, total annotations and replies, collaborative threads, active days, and tags. This link will always show updated learning analytics associated with this conversation as it grows over time - enjoy!

    1. Follow this CROWDLAAERS ("crowd layers") link to access analytics about the collaborative annotation conversation associated with the chapter "Beyond the LMS."

    1. Allison Skerrett, Amber Warrington, and Thea Williamson

      Our thanks to partner authors Allison Skerrett, Amber Warrington, and Thea Williamson for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short bio for each scholar is included at the end of this article. Also, all partner authors joined Marginal Syllabus readers and facilitators in a Connected Learning TV webinar about this article that will be available to view via Educator Innovator on Tuesday, January 8th - please watch as a complement to reading and annotating this important article!

    2. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our January conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  11. Dec 2018
  12. Nov 2018
    1. arcelle M. Haddix

      Our thanks to Dr. Marcelle Haddix for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! To learn more about Dr. Haddix, please read her bio at the end of this article.

    2. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our December conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. Articles

      I'm excited about the JLS annotation conversation throughout December, 2018! As this is a public conversation, I invite participants to track collaborative activity using the tool CROWDLAAERS ("crowd layers"), a public dashboard designed to report learning analytics associated with group – or ​crowd​ – discourse ​layers​ added via Hypothesis open web annotation to online content. Click this link to view real-time analytics specific to this document and conversation, including active participants, a calendar of activity, conversation threads, and tags. I hope text-participants find this tool useful!

    1. this is a document-level note. i could make a headnote and add something about an assignment, guiding reading questions, etc.

  13. Oct 2018
    1. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    2. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and the October/November conversation! This is the first article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    3. Antero Garcia and Elizabeth Dutro

      Our thanks to partner authors Antero Garcia and Elizabeth Dutro for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! Learn more about Drs. Garcia and Dutro by reading their bios at the end of this article.

  14. Aug 2018
    1. remikalir

      Now that this tweet thread has been converted into text and archived at this URL, I welcome people to add public annotations with links to supporting resources and documents. I'll do so, too.

    1. interactive

      and slightly more interactive if annotated, whether publicly or privately.

  15. Jul 2018
    1. the online ecosystems from which these claims originate, and also the ecosystems in which they are then more widely discussed
    2. The wiki houses student submissions of various claims that have made the rounds online, across lots of different fields in addition to politics, from environment to hate speech to race and immigration to psychology and neuroscience. Students from participating institutions work in public, collectively, to fill out the life cycle of the claim and summarize and weight the viewpoints that have been shared online about that claim
    1. inaccurate climate change narratives from scientifically sound and trustworthy information in the media
    1. scientists have a moral duty to speak up when they see misinformation masquerading as science. Up to now scientists have however had little choice but to engage in time-consuming op-ed exchanges, which result in one or two high-profile scientists arguing against the views of an individual who may have no commitment to scientific accuracy at all. Climate Feedback takes a different approach. Our collective reviews allow scientists from all over the world to provide feedback in a timely, effective manner.
    1. studentshighlight and discuss important issues in the reading, sharedifferent opinions and learnfrom others’ perspectives
    1. continued attempt to construct and maintain a shared conception of a problem
    1. Web annotations can be linked, shared between services, tracked back to their origins, searched and discovered, and stored wherever the author wishes
    1. a pervasive activity shared by all humanity across all walks of life
  16. May 2018
    1. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    2. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and May’s conversation! This is the eighth and final text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  17. Apr 2018
    1. Fred Goodman

      Fred was my academic grandfather. He passed last summer. I miss him very much. He introduced me to so much... taught at UM for over 50 years... and mentored generations of scholars and designers who eagerly carry forward the work of Illich and others. I recall hearing about these adventures when Ivan when Fred first mentored me as a teenager... it's also fun, and now bittersweet, to see him acknowledged in places like this.

    1. Educating Youth for Online Civic and PoliticalDialogue: A Conceptual Framework for the Digital Age

      Our thanks to partner author Erica Hodgin for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Erica and guest reader Paul Oh joined Marginal Syllabus co-founders Joe Dillon and Remi Kalir for a CLTV webinar discussion about this text - it will air "live" on Tuesday, April 3rd at 4p PT.

    2. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and April's conversation! This is the seventh text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open technology for web annotation.

  18. Mar 2018
    1. a site of intellectual and moral agency

      educational labor - building a site of intellectual and moral agency

    1. April Baker-Bell, Raven Jones Stanbrough, and Sakeena Everett

      Our thanks to partner authors Drs. April Baker-Bell, Raven Jones Stanbrough, and Sakeena Everett for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus. A conversation with our partner authors will air "live" on Tuesday, March 6th at 4 pm PT/7p ET - watch it here, it's a really amazing conversation.

    2. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and the March conversation! This is the sixth text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal - or contrary - to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  19. Feb 2018
    1. Thinq Studio—a digital pedagogy workshop, blog, and resource

      ThinqStudio has been recognized by the Chancellor's Office as a strategic priority to "advance scholarly excellence and innovation in teaching, research and creative work."

    1. chip away at the barriers that divide universities and communities and turn scholarly monologues into democratic dialogues.

      Open web annotation as social practice that encourages boundary crossing

    1. they can begin to see themselves think in the classroom and begin to build the muscle that critical thinking calls for.

      building critical thinking

    2. build webs of knowledge

      building as weaving

    3. We strove to build a space where the presence of everyone — teacher, technologist, and student — would be known, felt, and respected

      building a space for shared presence

    4. a site of intellectual and moral agency

      educational labor - building a site of intellectual and moral agency

    1. knowledgeable ignorance, perceptive ignorance, insightful ignorance

      cultivating high-quality ignorance

    1. Education start-ups like Seesaw give her their premium classroom technology as well as swag like T-shirts or freebies for the teachers who attend her workshops. She agrees to use their products in her classroom and give the companies feedback. And she recommends their wares to thousands of teachers who follow her on social media.

      Educator agency co-opted by neoliberal reform; pedagogy traded for the currencies of social and economic prestige.

    1. how can we capitalize on digital architecture to help students grow their connective fluency, their capacity for thinking in, building, and seeing connections?

      Digital architecture as scaffold for thinking and connecting

    1. Digital technologies of connectivity affect how we experience space and time; they alter the architecture of the world—connecting people who are not physically near, preserving words and pictures that would otherwise have been ephemeral and lost to time. Digital technologies are the most recent historical versions of communica-tion and information technologies that create these important changes in the architecture of the world.

      Architecting connectivity, architecting the world

    1. Joseph KahneUniversity of California, RiversideBenjamin BowyerSanta Clara University

      Our thanks to partner authors Joe Kahne and Ben Bowyer for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Joe also joined a number of educators for a Connected Learning TV webinar that will air on February 6th at 4p PT. You can watch it here.

    2. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and February’s conversation! This is the fifth text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  20. Jan 2018
    1. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    2. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and January’s conversation! This is the fourth text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  21. Dec 2017
    1. I try to make my literacy work a sustained argument against inequality and injustice.

      Thanks to dogtrax (Kevin Hodgson) for both his blog post inviting educators-as-annotators to create "a multimedia collage of thoughts and connections," as well as his annotations in these margins that blend hand-written with digital marginalia (here's one example), I'll share another from my reading:

      I'm inspired by Linda's emphasis on teaching as a sustained argument against inequality. In doing such work (for it is work, and more on that later), what - and who - offers sustenance so as to sustain such argumentation? How is such work sustained, particularly over time? And what is the role of networks in sustaining arguments against inequality? I also appreciate Linda's use of the word "work," for teaching is a labor - in this case, literacy education is a means of laboring for equality and justice.

    2. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    3. Linda Christensen

      Our thanks to partner author Linda Christensen for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Linda will be featured alongside Andrea Zellner (Literacy Consultant for Oakland Schools and Teacher Consultant, Red Cedar Writing Project), Kevin Hodgson (6th grade teacher in Southampton, Massachusetts and Outreach Co-director at Western Massachusetts Writing Project), and Marginal Syllabus organizers Joe Dillon and Remi Kalir in a Connected Learning TV webinar scheduled to air on Tuesday, December 5th. This annotation will be updated to include that webinar video.

    4. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and December's conversation! This is the third text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  22. Nov 2017
    1. Chapter 6

      This chapter by Nicole and Antero is associated with an issue of the journal Review of Research in Education that explores the theme "Disrupting Inequality Through Education Research." If Marginal Syllabus participants are interested in other articles from this issue and do not have access via an academic institution, please contact me privately (i.e. via Twitter DM, I'm @remikalir) and we'll make arrangements.

    2. Nicole MirraThe University of Texas at El PasoaNtero GarciaColorado State University

      Our thanks to partner authors Nicole Mirra and Antero Garcia for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! We anticipate that Nicole and Antero will join our annotation conversation throughout November. In addition, please check out these additional resources:

      • Nicole and Antero will be featured in an episode of Connected Learning TV, alongside Marginal Syllabus organizers Joe Dillon and Remi Kalir, scheduled to air on Tuesday, November 7th. We will update this annotation and embed the video once it's recorded.
      • Antero was also a partner author during the 2016-17 Marginal Syllabus. Antero and co-author Cindy O’Donnell-Allen contributed the introduction from their book Pose, Wobble, and Flow: A Culturally Proactive Approach to Literacy Instruction. You are very welcome to read and join that previous annotation conversation, too.
    3. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and November's conversation! This is the second text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

  23. Sep 2017
    1. Digital Media and Learning conference

      We're really excited to launch the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus at the same time as the 2017 Digital Media and Learning Conference, held at UC Irvine. If you're attending DML and want to learn more about the Marginal Syllabus, many people from our organizing team will also be attending and can talk with you about using Hypothesis and joining these public annotation conversations:

      • Christina Cantrill from the National Writing Project
      • Liana Gamber-Thompson, from NWP's Educator Innovator
      • Jeremy Dean, Director of Education at Hypothesis
      • Remi Kalir, Asst Prof of Learning Technologies at CU Denver

      The Marginal Syllabus will also be featured during the session "Layered Learning: Web Annotation in Collaborative and Connected Contexts," on Friday, October 6th, 2p in Emerald Bay DE.

    2. writing an account of the political lives of American Muslim youths

      Again, here's Marginal Syllabus partner author Sangita Shresthova's text "Between Storytelling and Surveillance: The Precarious Public of American Muslim Youth,” which was featured in the 2016-17 Marginal Syllabus.

    3. This blog post

      Our thanks to partner author Henry Jenkins for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Henry previously contributed to the 2016-17 Syllabus last April; we read and annotated a chapter from By Any Media Necessary, by Sangita Shresthova, titled "Between Storytelling and Surveillance: The Precarious Public of American Muslim Youth." Sangita, Henry, and a number of other Marginal Syllabus collaborators - Neta Kligler-Vilenchik, Liana Gamber-Thompson, and Joe Dillon - joined a webinar about the text and our annotation conversation: https://youtu.be/E9NHC9YqOTg

    4. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    5. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! This is the first text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

    1. hat we have done everything in our power to leave our garden patch a little greener than we found it.

      Here's another thing that really frustrates me about this letter, as much as I might agree with its broad brushstroke approach to advocating certain values - one of the most specific examples is an analogy (our garden patch)! I recognize that brevity was an authorial choice throughout, and that many specific examples were not included... so it's odd, to me, that an analogy was included rather than an example from an organization, or from the literature, or from history, or...