660 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. We unapol-ogetically state that schools not only are prison for Black girls but that schools are actively reproduc-ing slavery in its afterlife in English language arts. When Black girls’ identities, ways of learning, and leadership capacities are symbolically bonded by chains through a White-only curriculum, cultur-ally biased literary texts, and pedagogical standards, Black female students are in fact experiencing nor-malized racial violence.

      As a White educator, I am constantly reflecting on the ways I am complicit in normalizing racial violence. By naming it, I hope to dismantle it. I have to assume that my Whiteness will make me blind and I have to actively move myself into uncomfortable questions about my complicity and stay there so that I don't continue this cycle of violence.

    2. To minimize the lived experiences of Black girls demonstrates what Nigerian writer Chima-manda Ngozi Adichie called the danger of a single story: the complexity of Black girls’ lives reduced to a single, often stereotypical narrative weakens their humanity

      Here is another way this harms Black girls: there are very few children's books that focus on the relationship with Nature that feature children of color. https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2019/05/the-lack-of-diversity-in-childrens-books-about-nature/590152/

    3. Many of these stories include or suggest that the protagonist is both White and female. This practice often prevents many Black female learners from en-visioning themselves as queens or princesses.

      As a white person teaching in a classroom with predominantly Black students, I was struck early in my career with the way my own racial identity and my students' racial identities were part of the readers experience--reading To Kill A Mockingbird together we had a collective moment of confusion when I realized that they were reading Scout, Jem, and Atticus as Black characters while I understood them to be White. It was my first realization that so many white authors describe white characters without mention of race and every other ethnicity is named. My White privilege had blinded me to this fact for my whole life.

    4. Black women writ-ers and poets, including Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and Toni Morrison’s Be-loved,provide Black female students a purview into the narratives of pain, restoration, and Black suffer-ing from the voices of Black women.

      This is reminding me how I had a history of Education class in graduate school that included Song of Solomon as required reading and how powerful that was in my experience in that course. Makes me think more about the ways I might bring in literature by Black women into my current graduate teaching.

  2. Jun 2019
    1. freedom dreams
    2. As with Huckleberry Finn, Cinderella, and Snow White, English educators often regard liter-ary texts with predominately white characters as “credible” and “classic” examples of “appropriate” English literature.

      My African-American nephew recently worked on a hands-on STEM project at school that asked him to figure out how to get Rapunzel out of her tower. While maybe a great problem-solving project in many ways, these stories with white characters (not to mention the gender dynamics here too) continue to get replicated through the disciplines. This article has me wondering how a counter process could be used.

    3. chools are actively reproduc-ing slavery in its afterlife in English language arts

      A powerful statement for us as writing project educators to reflect upon and engage.

    4. In 1965, Nancy Larrick wrote the article “The All-White World of Children’s Books” in response to a five-year-old Black girl’s question regarding the invisibility of Black characters in children’s books

      That work is available online here (first 3 pages), and here (last 2 pages).

    5. Ngozi Adichie called the danger of a single story:

      This talk is a must-watch for educators today. https://youtu.be/D9Ihs241zeg

    6. 12-year-old Black girl Marley Dias’s #1000BlackGirlBooks have worked to decriminalize lit-eracy for Black girls.

      This is a powerful example of youth activism that has helped shed a light on the scarcity of Black girl characters in classroom libraries and in the books English classrooms foreground. https://youtu.be/U2nN01Pwv_E

    7. Black girls who are in English education classrooms that deject them to learn from majority White literary texts and de-value works by Black women authors are facing modern-day forms of educational enslavement.

      The curriculum subtly teaches them they belong in a lower station while reinforcing for white students that their stories have primacy.

    8. We posit that the acceptance and reproduction of anti-Blackness in in-school (through school discipline disproportion-ality, tracking, etc.) and out-of-school spaces (as ev-idenced in unlawful arrests and mass incarceration of Black communities) have contributed to the hy-perpathologization of Black people.

      As schools are obsessed by data, this contention seems well supported by all kinds of data. I'm thankful that this piece provides guidance about how to take on the inequities that persist in schools in the form of curricular biases and practices rooted in white supremacy.

  3. May 2019
    1. 102English Journal 107.6 (2018): 102–108Jemimah L. Young, Marquita D. Foster, and Dorothy Hines

      Our thanks to partner authors Jemimah Young, Marquita Foster, and Dorothy Hines for contributing to the 2018-19 LEARN Marginal Syllabus! Bios for each partner author are included at the end of this article.

    2. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

  4. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Baker-Doyle, K. J.

      Thank you Kira Baker-Doyle! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our fourth conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  5. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology & Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. West-Puckett, S., Smith, A., Cantrill, C., &Zamora, M.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our third conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  6. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Hsieh, B.

      Thank you Betina Hsieh! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our second conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  7. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Watulak, S. L., Woodard, R., Smith, A., Johnson, L., Phillips, N., & Wargo, K.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our first conversation! This is the first article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

    1. bit.ly/2cyzCfq

      I didn't notice this in my first read. It is a link to a lesson plan on Read Write Think. It strikes me that the kind of social annotation we're engaged in here could help groups of teachers share their reactions to these plans and results from teaching them.

    2. Similarly, the counter-narrative allows the researcher and participants to study and name a reality inconsistent with what might be consid-ered the norm or pervasive otherwise. A recurrent theme of this body of work is that the narrative and counter-narrative should be captured by the researcher, experienced by the research partici-pants, and told by people of color. (542)

      A great lens for teachers and school leaders.

    3. Since then, Michelle Alexan-der and others have shown in their research that the prison incarceration rates increased full-blown to 600 percent from the mid-1960s until the 2000s to now reflect a “racial caste system” (Alexander 2).

      It is so important that Alexander's work foregrounds this piece. The problem of mass incarceration must guide the decisions teachers make in the classroom. Her writing should change syllabi, revise rubrics and rearrange the furniture in classrooms.

    4. For Step 2, I shared two kinds of research: (1)the knowledge that we already possess and know from our own experience, and (2) the knowledge that is gained from formal research in the exterior world by seeking articles, books, news-papers, magazines, and peer-reviewed online sites.

      Highlighting the importance of the knowledge we already possess revalues the voices of the students and the stories they can gather from family and community members.

    5. P]eople need to read, write, and speak in certain sorts of socially sanctioned ways if they have any hopes of confronting problematic texts or producing informative and empowering ones.

      The hope with new technologies is that we can continually press forward in negotiating what is socially sanctioned. As norms for political discourse change with the advent of new media, how can we put our fingers on the scales of justice to advance equity? I hope we can advance this type of writing.

    6. The students’ persistence in the quest for change

      Everardo shares more about this persistence and the long labor of this work in the discussion with the authors (start around 4:00 as he starts to describe more about the context): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpJZo8uKKbg

    7. to tell a counternarrative

      This notion of counternarratives is a strong core theme throughout the LEARN Marginal Syllabus readings this year, https://educatorinnovator.org/campaigns/literacy-equity-remarkable-notes-learn-marginal-syllabus-2018-19/

    8. Everardo Pedraza and R. Joseph Rodríguez

      Our thanks to partner authors Everardo Pedraza and Joseph Rodriguez for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short bio of each author is included at the end of this article. And a Connected Learning TV webinar with both partner authors, and regular Marginal Syllabus participants, will go live on Tuesday, May 7th (and will be included in this annotation, too).

    9. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    10. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  8. Apr 2019
    1. These examples demonstrate Kara’s efforts to help her students critically examine place and see themselves as actors in creating a “consequential geography” (Soja, 2010, p. 1), particularly of the spaces they call home.

      This seems most important ....

    2. Kara also required her students to explore food options available in a one-mile radius around their school to determine whether they were part of a food desert

      Maybe she did this but it would be neat to see this as a map ... maybe even a layered map, with student narratives overlayed on top (like with ThingLink or something)

    3. Urban spaces, for example, are dense ecologies with complex networks of materials (both “natural” and human-made) and histories of race, class, and power dynamics (e.g., changing neighborhood demographics, systemic housing discrimination).

      and maybe history is another layer in this dense geography -- what has happened before echoing (for good or for not) into what is happening now in any given space ...

    4. teacher inquiry group focused on cultivating culturally sustaining ELA pedagogy

      Noting that these educators have been working with each other in an inquiry context.

    5. Kara cultivated her students’ urban literacies by encouraging them to draw from their local knowledge of self, culture, and place; to critically situate their local knowledge in broader sociopolitical contexts; and to craft counter narratives

      She does this masterfully too -- listen to her describe the way she supports youth in following shared inquiries and discovering for themselves the interconnected elements -- start around 15:45 with Chris's question and go to 29:45

      https://youtu.be/Gq9AQvjh_PY

    6. A pedagogy of spatial justice, then, supports the development of urban literacies

      I find this really interesting; how inquiring into (spatial) justice itself supports literacy development. A powerful notion that speaks to the ways we develop literacy socially and communally and based on shared purpose.

    7. Soja describes spatial justice in urban contexts as “fighting for the right to the city” (p. 6).

      The Right to the City Alliance has turned this work from lefebvre, and turned it into a movement. I have cited their work in a previous class I taught. Find out more about them: https://righttothecity.org/,

      and here's a video from them: https://vimeo.com/87908751

    8. Kara also required her students to explore food options available in a one-mile radius around their school to determine whether they were part of a food desert. In the five blocks around the school, Kara’s students found one grocery store whose selection was “not great,” three gas stations, a drugstore, a corner store, and a bulk candy store. Through an explicit examination of these places in the community, Kara foregrounded her students’ local knowledge alongside other mentor texts and asked her students to “read” and interpret these places in their neighborhood in the same way.

      This is a kind of reading assignment that can help students see the transferability of the thinking strategies we bring to both our neighborhoods and the texts we use to study them.

    9. As teachers like Kara cultivate urban literacies through a pedagogy of spatial justice

      One of my big takeaways from this reading, which for me includes the conversation we had about the text in the webinar (embedded below), is the importance of Tara's inquiry stance. When she was asked to teach using Engage New York's Common Core-aligned curriculum, she asserted both her agency and her curiosity by inviting her class to research and address an issue that resonated with them. To me, her process as a teacher is instructive. https://youtu.be/Gq9AQvjh_PY

    10. These responses allowed students to position themselves as agentive actors in the complex network of local and global dynamics contributing to food quality, obesity, and equity in their neighborhoods.

      Literacy here fosters agency for youth as they understand their place in complex systems.

    11. In one of the first activities of the unit, students wrote and performed spoken word poems about their neighborhoods (e.g., important/noteworthy intersections). However, they also complicated negative stereotypes of the South Side; for example, one student, Malcolm, wrote

      This seems like a replicable way to ask youth to develop counter narratives at the same time they develop their voice as writers.

    12. It is situated in a community encompassing multiple neighborhoods where there has been little construction or infrastructure updates since the 1930s beyond a large public housing project constructed in the 1950s. At that time, the population shifted from 6 percent to 86 percent African American. It is now 99 percent African American, and over half the population lives at or below poverty level.

      This specific explanation reminds me how important it is for us to unpack the word "urban" when we talk about urban schools. Understanding the power of Kara's teaching moves requires us to understand how those moves are responsive and community-specific.

    13. Explorations of urban literacy have attempted to extend “the focus on literacy from school-sponsored practices and events . . . to situate and resituate literacy across political and educative conditions and situations that involve children, youth, and/or adults of color” (Kinloch, 2011, p. 2)

      Extending the focus on literacy to non-traditional texts, events and places is vital equity work. We have to understand how biased the traditional framing of literacy is.

    14. greater control over how the spaces in which we live are socially produced

      An excellent example of this, also in Chicago, is the Mexican-American area known as Pilsen. One way the community has taken control is through the development of street murals, described here: https://interactive.wttw.com/my-neighborhood/pilsen/art-as-activism.

  9. Mar 2019
    1. Cultivating

      This open access version of "Cultivating urban literacies on Chicago's South Side through a pedagogy of spatial justice" is being publicly read, annotated, and discussed as a part of the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus. To learn more about this project and discussion, click Page Notes (above) to access additional information and linked resources.

    2. AndreAVaughan■rebeccA woodard■nAthAn c. phillips■kArAtaylor

      Our thanks to partner authors Andrea Vaughan, Rebecca Woodard, Nathan Phillips, and Kara Taylor for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! Additional biographical information about the authors is included at the end of this article. And a Connected Learning TV webinar featuring all the authors will be broadcast on Tuesday, April 2nd and also embedded in our annotation conversation, too.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our April conversation! This is the sixth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. the experience of Native peoples across time

      Through the companion interview of Debbie on CLTV, I also noticed I was reflecting more on the experience of Native peoples across space as well. In the interview she discusses the fact that all native/indigenous people do not look alike and you very likely have indigenous students in your class without even knowing it. This definitely got me thinking about the indigenous populations here in the Philadelphia and mid-Atlantic region.

    2. President lincoln

      In the CTLV discussion with Debbie Reese, she talked about the mass hanging/execution of 38 Dakota men in 1862 signed off by President Lincoln was in office. She says she looks for it's mention in any book about Lincoln created for youth and has yet to see it. I had to look it up to understand more myself having no knowledge of it. Here are Wikipedia I found it under Dakota War 1862: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_War_of_1862

    3. 500 federally recognized tribal nations in the United States today

      I think it's so important for us to be aware of and to teach about these intricacies. It's important that we recognize whose land we're on. One resource I like to use is the map at Native Land.

    4. Indigenous Peoples Day

      In the neighboring town, middle school students pushed and argued for this change, which has had some ripple effect in our communities. read more

    5. Native nationhood. Without this recognition, our status as sovereign nations whose people were—and are—Indigenous to this continent are erased

      I so appreciate having this formulation made explicit. Failure to recognize native nationhood is erasure. Thank you.

    6. Native nationhood

      This reminds me of an NPR article I read a few years back about more historically accurate maps of the Native American Nations. The type of research and composition that lead to the development of these maps could guide the development of research and composition efforts in schools. I like the article because it points to a more accurate historical reference as well as activist work of a young person.

    7. When teachers use Thanksgiving as the vehicle for their instruction about Native peoples, they are inadvertently locat-ing Native lives in the past.

      This is something that feels both subtle and horribly pervasive in the way we think about Native people, always presenting them in historical contexts rather than as part of the modern world.

    8. Another problem is the “myths, legends, and folktales” books that are marketed as Native. They are ubiquitous and mostly written by people who are not, themselves, Native.

      While there is much we need to unlearn in schools about Native people, the challenge of unlearning is compounded by a supply and demand issue with publishers and teachers who expect their literature about Indigenous cultures to match the general stereotypes we've been raised on.

    9. Language Arts Lessons

      This open access version of "Critical Indigenous Literacies: Selecting and Using Children's Books about Indigenous Peoples" is being publicly read, annotated, and discussed as a part of the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus. To learn more about this project and discussion, click Page Notes (above) to access additional information and linked resources.

    10. #OwnVoices

      Click here to read the latest tweets tagged #OwnVoices.

    11. American Indians in Children’s Liter-ature (https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com)

      "Established in 2006, American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL) provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children's and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society." Visit the site to read book reviews, Native media, and more.

    12. Debbie Reese

      Our thanks to partner author Debbie Reese for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short biography of Debbie Reese is included at the end of this article, and you can also learn more about her here.

    13. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    14. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our March conversation! This is the fifth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. The Chicago Learning Exchange (CLX) is developing this guide to help practitioners put the theory of connected learning into practice. We are sharing this draft to:

      • Apply the guide by enabling you to share your own insights and reflections. Use annotations to share thoughts and questions inspired by the guide.
      • Encourage interaction and peer professional learning by enabling you to reply to the comments of others. Reply to other people's annotations.
      • Invite feedback to help improve the guide. Use annotations to share resources and suggestions.

      Thank you for engaging with the guide, your own practice, and with each other. On the last page of this draft, please add your name and organization so that we can add you to the list of contributors.

    1. I started seeing myself as a strong Black male, and smart. My mind started thinkin’ I’m someone makin’ a difference.

      This is powerful insight.

    2. counter images that falsely portray their intellec-tual abilities, academic acuity, cultural competencies, and sociohistorical realities.

      I am thinking of how the recent trend in adolescent literature is finally doing some of this -- showing us the lives and thoughts of people from diverse backgrounds and experiences, and how valuable that is for understanding each other. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-huIZghog8o

    3. Out here, I don’t worry ’bout that

      Such a stark contrast between sense of identity inside the school vs outside in the community/world. How do we as teachers find a way to bring those worlds together in meaningful ways? This is what we need to be considering ... (as we are, here, and elsewhere). His voice here is a powerful reminder of that.

  10. Feb 2019
    1. Thank you for contributing to the development of CLX's Connected Learning Guide. We'd love your help with three things:

      1. Share your reactions to any part of the document. We welcome praise and constructive critiques.
      2. Share recommendations of resources that you think should be added.
      3. Be interactive. Use this as a platform for peer professional learning.

      Lastly, if you came to this document online, be sure to tell us who you are by adding an annotation on the last page so we can list you (name and org) in the contributors section.

      Thank you!

    1. We focus on how their engagements in nonschool, community-based, social justice initiatives represent strategic attempts to resist and counter deficit narratives or ideologies

      Connected Learning connections?

    2. rown v. Board of Education dec

    3. We agree with Mann’s and Gonzalez’s beliefs about public education and the need to provide opportunities for people to actively participate in a democratic, multiracial, and multiethnic society.

      I agree, too. I wonder how the Charter School debate plays out in this, though. Charter Schools are public schools, but they exist off to the side. Do they also contribute to the greater good? The ethics of what happens to existing public schools as Charter Schools siphon off resources is a real debate.

    4. Tanja BurkhardUniversity of PittsburghCarlotta PennThe Ohio State University

      Here's our Connected Learning TV webinar with partner authors Valerie Kinloch, Tanja Burkhard, and Carlotta Penn, also featuring regular Marginal Syllabus participants Michelle King and Cherise McBride - enjoy! https://youtu.be/XzK4jD3QaaY

    5. Our narrative process of listening to, documenting, and analyzing their stories allowed us to access rich layers of data about how they voiced and storied their experiences in the world.

      I wonder again how we might bring in these methods of data collection into teacher/school data analysis practices...rather than allowing the standardized testing data reign supreme.

    6. “understanding of the purpose of school, particularly the personal, social, and work preparation benefits”

      One thing that occurs to me is the way school can sometimes be more interested in other purposes of school: socialization (follow these rules or else) rather than on the purposes listed here.

    7. mphasizing physical space, we believe space plays a crucial role in understanding adolescent literacies.

      Is it emphasizing space as much as networks? Social network analysis conceptualizes schools as a "network in a box." It is by nature a closed network. This matters in terms of conceptualizing what is happening in the learning of our students.

    8. street, B. V. (1984). Cambridge Studies in Oral and Literate Culture: Vol. 9.Literacy in theory and practice. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press
    9. We rely on Street (1984), who distinguishes between two dominant, competing models of literacy—the autonomous and ideological. The autonomous model, which views literacy as a set of discrete skills, “disguises the cultural and ideological assumptions that underpin it so that it can then be presented as though they are neutral and universal and that literacy as such will have ... benign effects” (Street, 2003, p. 77). On the other hand, the ideological model understands literacy not as neutral, but as “always embedded in socially constructed epistemological principles. It is about knowledge: the ways in which people address reading and writing are themselves rooted in conceptions of knowledge, identity, and being” (Street, 2003, pp. 77–78).

      I really appreciate this framing of the definitions of literacy: wondering how I can personally make this more visible in my work with teachers around literacy.

    10. They used literacy to: (1) interrogate their racial-ized experiences inside and outside school, and (2) produce counternarratives to popular assumptions about Black youth from low-income urban communities.

      I wonder about how adoption of CCSS support and/or undermine the need for this type of soul-affirming literacy work.

    11. bombarded with standardized tests

      It is not only this bombardment but the attendant stress and depersonalization that comes with these standardized tests.

    12. dealing with Souls and not with Dollars”

      One way Michigan has been addressing this idea is by trying to get at equity in school funding. Hopeful our new legislators in all our branches will help make this happen: https://www.fundmischools.org/

    13. Valerie KinlochUniversity of Pittsburgh

      Our thanks to partner authors Valerie Kinloch, Tanja Burkhard, and Carlotta Penn for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A Connected Learning TV webinar featuring all three partner authors will be broadcast on Tuesday, Feb 5th, with the video also embedded here in our annotation conversation. Brief bios for all three partner authors are also included at the end of this article.

    14. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    15. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our February conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  11. Jan 2019
    1. Kalir (in press)

      It's an honor to be cited by Maha and Autumm in their paper! This particular article was published at the end of 2018 as "Equity-oriented design in open education." Here's the journal's version as well as an open access preprint.

    1. Wenger’s (1998) useful concept of constellations of communities of practice is important for understanding the significance of belonging, shared identity, and learning about matters of practice that teachers self-identify as necessary to their ongoing development.

      Important concepts. Also, in online places, we often refer to the idea of Affinity Spaces, which has similar resonance. From Gee's work: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affinity_space

    2. ocial justice teaching

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B29PLiltESs Social Justice is at the heart of our mission statement for the Western Massachusetts Writing Project -- all programs designed through WMWP must reflect our mission statement. This all comes out of work done years ago with NWP's Project Outreach, whose resonance continues at our site today.

    3. National Writing Project (NWP)

      As I'm thinking jotting notes about what "urban" connotes in this text and what it means to me, I'm reminded of my one and only experience attending the NWP's Urban Sites conference. Unlike other conferences I'd attended hosted by various organizations, this literacy conference foregrounded equity. I remember Black educators remarking during the close of the conference that they felt heard at the urban sites conference in ways they never did at other kinds of convenings. Since urban is so often used interchangeably with negative terms, I want to think more about how it could mean equity-focused, or be related to a predisposition to listening for understanding amidst diverse perspectives.

    4. urban schools given the pressures of high-stakes accountability systems and endemic deficit perspectives on students and their communities that frequently permeate urban schools

      Here "urban" seems to be synonymous with troubled.

    5. teaching in urban schools

      In our conversation about this piece the authors discussed how the word "urban" has come to mean all kinds of things when we discuss the contexts for teaching and learning. Reader respondents also asked what the article meant by "urban." On my second read through this piece, I want to pay attention to what the term signifies here at the same time I pay closer attention to what the word means for me. I've described the schools I work in as urban for so long, I can become more intentional about what I hope to communicate about the place, the students and the teachers' experiences.

    6. Allison Skerrett, Amber Warrington, and Thea Williamson

      Our thanks to partner authors Allison Skerrett, Amber Warrington, and Thea Williamson for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short bio for each scholar is included at the end of this article. Also, all partner authors joined Marginal Syllabus readers and facilitators in a Connected Learning TV webinar about this article that will be available to view via Educator Innovator on Tuesday, January 8th - please watch as a complement to reading and annotating this important article!

    7. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    8. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our January conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  12. Dec 2018
    1. We are allwriters
    2. spoken word poetry
    3. The youth will lead the revolution.

    4. multiple genres

    5. ee themselves as writers

    6. The work that we do in Writing Our Lives can serve as a site of healing and for resisting and working against violence.

    7. Parents and community members understood writing to be the timed writing tasks for standardized exams or the demonstration of the conventions of writing on school assignments,

    8. here was, however, deep frustration with the current state of education for African American children by several community members and parents, including me

    9. mentors

    10. I define radical youth literacies as ways of knowing, doing, writing, and speaking by youth who are ready to change the world

    11. From his bedroom to his neighborhood streets, he wrote and composed music lyrics, uploaded audio files, and directed music videos.

    12. Writing Our Lives

    13. support the literacy practices that young people already have but that are often hidden in the shadows

      The 2-minute video below has Chris Rogers's test-run Morlocks analogy for underground writers that he shared in our Educator Innovator webinar. https://youtu.be/NCRaLMIKKSQ

    14. Seeingand Honoring Youth Writers

      A recorded discussion with the author about this work and article can now be found now at CLTV: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rU9U9qEfKhk

  13. Nov 2018
    1. arcelle M. Haddix

      Our thanks to Dr. Marcelle Haddix for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! To learn more about Dr. Haddix, please read her bio at the end of this article.

    2. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    3. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our December conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    1. In our remaining space, our goal is to open expansive conversations among English educators and researchers about supporting students’ well-being and positioning in classrooms.

      I believe the introduction of texts like Christopher Bell's TED Talk, "Bring on the female superheroes!" and reading activities like the Twitter think aloud in the video below shift students' positioning to an agentive position, where they can choose to shape public discourse. https://youtu.be/bwbkhqlD2XE

    2. Testimony, Witness, and Trauma as a Lens on Healing

      I'm reminded of Bronwyn LaMay's work Personal Narrative, Revised: Writing Love and Agency in the High School Classroom

      We annotated a chapter from that book a few years back: https://educatorinnovator.org/writing-love-and-ourselves-in-the-classroom-and-beyond/

    3. our classrooms

      I appreciate Antero and Elizabeth's use of "our classrooms" throughout this piece; we are in this together.

    4. In classrooms, testimony to experience is always present, whether explicitly invited or authorized, as the bodies of teachers and students tell stories of connection, disconnection, care, dismissal, belonging, and exclusion.

      This seems like a real anchor point of the piece for me ... how to ensure our classrooms are spaces where this kind of sharing and understanding, and compassion and empathy, might happen.

    5. Hurricane Katrina was a natural disaster felt by a nation through the images and stories in the media.

      And later, through deeper narratives

  14. Oct 2018
    1. The days and weeks that followed the historic night only furthered the flood of teachers expressing concern and uncertainty.

      https://youtu.be/oAVO9H264aw

      Antero Garcia provides background on the writing of this piece in this clip from the full Educator Innovator webinar.

    2. t is the oppressive and symbolically violent use of the essentials of our discipline—words, rhetoric, and modes of communica-tion—that sticks to us most in the ongoing aftermath of the election

      Words matter.

    3. we also recognize that some readers did

      Good to acknowledge this. The votes didn't come out of nowhere. They came from within various communities, and communities of practice.

    4. I am struggling with how to teach today and the next few days.

      This sounds like something I said to my wife. And she said to me. And we all said to each other.

    5. not prepared to address the intersections of healing, politics, and emotion in classrooms.

      This seems like an overseen dimension of teacher prep, right? As if teaching can occur in a vacuum and emotions need not be addressed or recognized in the classroom, let alone be brought in explicitly and handled with sensitivity.

    6. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    7. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and the October/November conversation! This is the first article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    8. Antero Garcia and Elizabeth Dutro

      Our thanks to partner authors Antero Garcia and Elizabeth Dutro for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! Learn more about Drs. Garcia and Dutro by reading their bios at the end of this article.

    1. But if you are in the US, your career will survive completely even if you never read a single article by someone not from your culture, not in your language.

      What an important issue to point out. I wonder how the #marginalsyllabus could help with non-dominant scholarship? We should certainly interrogate why other cultures' scholarship is seen as less when we so publicly struggle with our public ed systems.

    1. There must be a better system, and I would have hoped that bright minds in Washington, D.C., could sit down and work out a solution that takes into account all of the concerns that have been raised.

      All the more reason that voting is important -- they are our elected officials.

    2. Will you ask them the hard questions, and tell them that you will hold them to their words, or that they should seek a different sort of employment? Will the new freshmen class of Congress learn to just yes us continually until the roar fades to a whimper, which is apparently rule #2 in the Congressional handbook? We all know rule #1, and look where that has gotten us to. Our school students deserve better. Immigrant families deserve better. We deserve better.

      The transition to asking people how they will vote in response to the dizzying 24 hour news cycle is a key strategy that I appreciate here.

      Will you remember that children in cages were a thing on the news, and a policy initiated by our government?

      Will you remember that violence against women in the workplace was minimized, as has been our tradition?

      Will you accept "thoughts and prayers" again as a response to the shooting of unarmed people in a place of worship?

  15. Jun 2018
    1. We live in dark times. Many people want to stand up for their own rights and the rights of others, but feel unsure about how. Ms. Smalls’ experience, like that of two brave women in Montana last month, teaches us that sometimes knowing one’s rights and speaking out with confidence delivers truth to abusive power.

      Finding teachable moments in the darkest of places.

    1. Here are some issues I have as this annotatory process grows.

      1. If the annotation continues over a period of weeks, then how can we attend to it?
      2. If an annotation flashmob's mentality is "one and done", then should we not say that from the beginning?
      3. How can we keep the spirit of care and vulnerability as issues become more fractious and as weaker ties begin to crowd into the annotation space?
    2. Critical Digital Literacies

      I am more and more drawn to the work of Damon Centola on the spread of 'behaviors' through networks. I would like to substitute "behaviors' for literacy and begin to apply Centola's work in the classroom. He has a new book coming out on Monday and I have put a talk of his on Vialogues so that we can annotate that: https://vialogues.com/vialogues/play/44449

      Aside: When an annotated space reaches a critical mass I think we need summary behaviors or further highlighting and notification procedures. Kevin has already done so in one post. We might call these emergent writing or emergent behaviors.

    3. Again, these experiences provided multiple opportunities for Black girls in the class to explore social issues across modalities and raise questions about audience, privilege, power, voice, and equity. The questions they raised in discussions and the work they produced drew on multiple literacies that were tied to their identities as Black girls.

      This work strikes me as important and reminds me that we can place black women writers and related equity issues at the center of our curriculum for all students. The stories and issues we deem worthy of study communicate their cultural importance.

    4. Please join me—and the other contributors to this issue—and continue the conversation

      Answering the call with this annotation activity .. thanks, Troy!

    5. http://knightlab.com/)

      Need to explore? Me, too.

      https://knightlab.northwestern.edu/

    6. create rich, ethnographic portraits of their homes, neighborhoods, schools, stores, and other spaces

      During one round of Hear My Home, I had taken my friend Anna's soundscape and refashioned it into a multimedia piece, complete with poem:

      Check out Anna's Soundscape on Zeega

    7. Rhythms of recent riots, pulses of contemporary protest marches, and the acoustics of American sit-ins serve as a starting point to explore the sonic intensities and politics of sound. In recent weeks, individuals have taken to the streets to demonstrate alliance with and affinity for making their collective voices heard.

      Found Poem from That Passage:

      starting pulse;

      the streets

      make rhythms of

      our voices, heard,

      the American acoustics

      of politics, march

      in protest, explore

      contemporary sound.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIZ-uG2UTgI

      (with apologies to Cassie and Jon)

    8. #hearmyhome” project

      Hear My Home

      f you are an educator, in what ways can you imagine incorporating and building soundscapes into your curriculum and practice as a classroom teacher? What benefits and/or constraints do you anticipate for yourself and/or your students?

    9. digital writing requires that we explore all forms of media as text worthy of analysis, especially when students are actively composing texts with numerous options such as these.

    10. Digital writing requires that we explore all forms of media as text worthy of analysis, including what could otherwise be dismissed as just ambient noise.

    11. Digital writing requires time, space, and attention, as well as an inquiry stance.

    12. et’s take a look at the future that’s happening right now

      If I may, I have a Flipboard Magazine that I try to curate pieces about writing, teaching, learning and technology -- and how digital writing is pushing the boundaries of composition.

      Along the Edges of Digital Writing

    13. What it means to teach the English language arts with websites, apps, and social media continues to evolve quickly, both in terms of the tools as well as in terms of the practices.

      And not all professional development has caught up -- this is the value of programs like EdCamp (where teachers lead the way) and the National Writing Project (my professional home as a teacher for the way ideas can bubble up from the classroom, and the 'teachers teaching teacher' is professional practice).

    14. my book was able to keep the focus on the writing and the technology

      I recommended this book to many people for this reason -- the focus was on the writing and the learning and development of the writer, not the technology itself. We too often get lost in the new and cool tech, and lose sight of the learning (and the reality that many of the tools now here will be gone, so adapting to technology platforms and environments is key.)

  16. May 2018
    1. Civic education should help young people acquire and learn to use the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will prepare them to be com-petent and responsible citizens throughout their lives. [This includes being able to] act politically by having the skills, knowledge, and commitment needed to accomplish public purposes . . . [and to] have moral and civic virtues such as concern for the rights and welfare of others, social responsibility, tolerance and respect, and belief in their capacity to make a difference. (p. 4)

      In this context, helping students acquire skills is a school's achievement.

    2. Beyond just banishing boredom, connecting school with the world in which students live leads them to value learning and to feel a sense of belonging to the school com-munity, resulting in higher achievement.

      In public education we feel this pressure to say that _ results in higher achievement, as if connecting school to the world in which students live isn't the goal, but a means to a measured end. It seems like connecting school to the world in which students live creates a learning network we can cultivate as opposed to looking at student work as a deliverable that we want to weigh and measure. If we have an asset-focused view of students, connecting school to their lives will serve them and their talents better.

    3. Or draft justification statements to explain how their projects are indeed covering Common Core standards (really—we’ve read some)

      I would argue a well-designed project does a better job of covering the standards.It definitely provides a more #authentic, #real-world environment.

    4. ivic engagement projects

      My wife just wrote about this for our local newspaper (as part of a partnership between our writing project and the local paper to raise teacher voices in public).

    5. your academic skills are being strengthened by the project.

    6. ust one lonely hand went up

    7. Elizabeth rarely gave stu-dents explicit guidance, but she didn’t remain silent either, instead re-peatedly tossing questions and challenges back to them.

      Just noting this important insight ...

    8. www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-lUrM-rmIE

      The beauty of annotation is that we can embed videos right here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-lUrM-rmIE

    9. students had discovered that a bill was under consideration in the Illinois State House of Representatives to end the automatic transfer from juvenile to adult courts. Now the kids were highly focused: How could they lobby legislators to pass the bill?

      Did teacher alert kids? Or were kids alert enough now to be following the news? Wondering about places where teachers intervene and where students take charge ....

    10. Which led to Elizabeth’s next question: “So how should we deal with the difference? How could we arrive at a consensus?”

      From a teaching perspective, this pivot point -- the question posed after the discussion -- is most important, and knowing when that moment is and what to ask is critical (and takes time and mistakes, perhaps)

    11. Steven Zemelman

      I interviewed Steve about his book at Middleweb

      Read When Student Inquiry Becomes Student Action

    12. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    13. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and May’s conversation! This is the eighth and final text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open platform for web annotation.

    14. actionINQUIRY

      Our thanks to partner author and writing project director Steven Zemelman, as well as his publisher Heinemann, for contributing this text from From Inquiry to Action: Civic Engagement with Project-Based Learning in All Content Areas to the 2017-18 Writing Our Civic Futures project.

      Also join Steve and educators Mauricio Pineda, Elizabeth Robbins, and Heather Van Benthuysen and the co-founders of Marginal Syllabus, Remi Kalir and Joe Dillon, for a related discussion of the text and thoughts on annotation. The broadcast will be available at Educator Innovator on May 8.

      We also want to celebrate the fact that Steve has been a regular contributor and participant in the 2017-2018 Writing Our Civic Futures. Thank you Steve!

    1. What prevents their frustration from shaping new institutions is a lack not only of imagination but frequently also of appropriate language and of enlightened self-interest.

      I appreciate the notion that enlightened self-interest on the part of learners and a community could lead to meaningful school reform. It can also lead to the creation of pathways in our current systems.

    2. Everywhere this situation discourages both the motivation and the financing for large-scale planning for nonschooled learning.

      This is a fascinating notion that I had never considered about #connectedlearning. Illich presents funding for school and 3rd spaces as mutually incompatible at least which I don't know if I buy.

    3. The richest parents, some 10 percent, can afford private education for their children and help them to benefit from foundation grants. But in addition they obtain ten times the per capita amount of public funds if this is compared with the per capita expenditure made on the children of the 10 percent who are poorest. The principal reasons for this are that rich children stay longer in school, that a year in a university is disproportionately more expensive than a year in high school, and that most private universities depend-at least indirectly-on tax-derived finances.

      Good school, rich school; Bad school, poor school via the Atlantic

      Connecticut is not the first state to wrestle with the conundrum caused by relying heavily on local property taxes to fund schools; since the 1970s, nearly every state has had litigation over equitable education, according to Michael Rebell, the executive director of the Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College at Columbia University. Indeed, the CCJEF lawsuit, first filed in 2005, is the state’s second major lawsuit on equity. The first, in 1977, resulted in the state being required to redistribute some funds among districts, though the plaintiffs in the CCJEF case argue the state has abandoned that system, called Educational Cost Sharing.

    4. They all match people in order to explore certain "themes"; and these are dealt with in courses, seminars, and curricula in which presumed "common interests" are prepackaged. Such theme-matching is by definition teacher-centered: it requires an authoritarian presence to define for the participants the starting point for their discussion.

      This reminds me of the kind of matchmaking that happens in #ds106's assignment bank and the #clmooc make bank.

  17. Apr 2018
    1. These valuable experiences provided students withcritical skills and strategies to participate in civic and political dialogue paving the way for meaningful and productiveparticipation in the digital age.

      I'd be curious to know how the Youth Voices kids do as they go to college and beyond public school. Have they used those skills for activism, for further connections, for jobs? Another research project for another time ...

    2. youth may either minimize or withdraw their participation from online dialogue because of fears ofnegativity and conflict.

      Can we add privacy violations and data scraping to the list of why young people might be wary?

    3. posting reflections was more fitting than posting a final five-paragraph essay.

      And more authentic, too, I suspect.

    4. Youth Voices is a school-based social network platform that was developed by NWP teachers to bring studentstogether online to share writing and engage in conversation
    5. noted a lack of or “outdated” curriculum

      This is fascinating to me because it speaks to the need for implementation research around projects like the YouthVoices.live work referenced in this article.

    6. a healthy democracy and is a key aspect of civic and political life

      Important to note the date of this article for a few reasons: 1 How have things changed since the 2016 presidential election?

      2 Does this article express a sense of urgency? Should it?

    7. Youth Voices
    8. Whereas low-income youth are more likely to learn or practice basic skillscausing what Schradie called “the digital production gap.

      And testing. Lots and lots of testing. All year. That's too often how computer labs are utilized in many struggling districts -- to gather achievement data instead of teaching skills for communication. This was true years ago and still rings true today in too many schools.

    9. 2005

      13 years ago. Not sure this holds up.

    10. a significant number of respondentsrecommended withdrawing from the conversation rather than working toward productive dialogue.

      This is not a surprising finding, and yet, it's disheartening. I wonder if this is still true, two years later -- after the election that has divided the US. And do we want more withdrawal (giving us time to think and ponder our reaction to something) or less (engaging, but maybe engaging with diatribe)? This is all the heart of discussions about how we engage in discussions. I'm not sure of the answer ...

    11. echo chambers

    12. filter bubbles

    13. online dialogue can take place anytime, anywhere

      Including the margins ...

    14. Internet-fueled communication

      I'm looking at the date of this article --June 2016 -- and thinking, this term here seems almost quaint now, doesn't it? All of this has now been ramped to the extreme -- the flow of communication, good and ill -- has taken over our ability to curate and make sense of things.

    15. Dialogue

    16. Educating Youth for Online Civic and PoliticalDialogue: A Conceptual Framework for the Digital Age

      Our thanks to partner author Erica Hodgin for contributing this important text to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus! Erica and guest reader Paul Oh joined Marginal Syllabus co-founders Joe Dillon and Remi Kalir for a CLTV webinar discussion about this text - it will air "live" on Tuesday, April 3rd at 4p PT.

    17. If you are joining the Marginal Syllabus for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to publicly annotate an online text for the first time, here are a few useful resources:

    18. Welcome to the 2017-18 Marginal Syllabus and April's conversation! This is the seventh text we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Writing Our Civic Futures." The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project's name, Marginal Syllabus, embraces a political and technical double entendre; we partner with authors whose writing may be considered marginal—or contrary—to dominant education norms, and online conversations with authors occur in the margins of their texts using web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus is a partnership with the National Writing Project, who is hosting the 2017-18 syllabus, and Hypothesis, an organization building an open technology for web annotation.

    1. Even if they, as individuals, have developed the digital literacy to use their blogs to express their activism/citizenship, the sociopolitical environment makes it difficult for them to actually apply this expertise without substantial personal ris

      These sociopolitical environments are ever shifting, also. It seems as though students need to know how to engage publicly as well as how to evaluate the risks of doing so. What are ways we can ask learners to practice with these kinds of decisions?

    1. Originally seen on Twitter in response to the unceasing murder of unarmed young men and women of color at the hands of police officers, #BlackLivesMatter is an ongoing movement to end violence—both literal and symbolic—that people of color continue to experience. As such, we are intentional in noting that #BlackLivesMatter is not simply a “trending” phrase or a “dialogue.” As a movement, #BlackLivesMatter has persevered in public consciousness over the past 3 years largely due to its ability to sustain participation in both online spaces and in physical demonstrations like “die ins” (Levenson, 2014) held during holiday shopping seasons.

      The #BlackLivesMatter movement leverages social media in such a way that its digital footprint can be read. Would-be activists can make meaning of and draw inspiration from the public networked writing of the movement leaders and of those whose voices emerge as powerful in any given moment.

    1. If par-ticipants are guided by directional motivation, then we hypothesize(Hypothesis 1) that those participants assigned to an ideologically alignedpost will be more likely to judge the post as accurate

      Here's the hypothesis re: directional motivation.

  18. Mar 2018
    1. Finally, it is important for educators to implement these same tools with White students who benefit from white supremacy and the damaging narratives that mainstream media produce about Black youth and other youth of color.

      YES! It's time for white folks to dismantle white supremacy.

    2. In the July 2016 English Education themed issue, “Why Black Girls’ Litera-cies Matter: New Literacies for a New Era,” Sealey-Ruiz argues, “instruction must be urgent and purposeful in responding to and anticipating the social context of our times” (p. 295). In the wake of racial violence, we argue that it is important for educators to engage in revolutionary praxis by reimagining their classroomsas spaces for triage, self-care, healing, and social transfor-mation.

      I love the image of classrooms as spaces for "triage, self-care, healing, and social transformation." This also means that those of us who are white teachers need to also do our work to make sure we aren't enacting our own white privelege (and thus anti-blackness) in our own practices.

    3. As illustrated during the Ferguson6 and Baltimore7

      I keep reading this and thinking about how differently the Parkland activists have been received as opposed to BLM activitists. It has also been heartening to see the way they have combined movements in response to critical readings (rooted in the lens presented here) of their movments: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/parkland-race-and-the-gun-violence-that-goes-overlooked

    4. “he suffered from mental illness”

      This is something that folks have critiqed in the #WalkUpNotOut hashtag and ideas: both in keeping with the strategy of protraying white criminals as mentally ill and also the idea that victims themselves are responsible for the violence they experience. https://www.salon.com/2018/03/25/the-sexist-racist-implications-of-the-walk-up-not-out-movement_partner/

    5. who was assaulted in her math class

      I'm just noticing now this mention that it was a math class where this happened. I'm not sure what to make if it really, and I don't want to over-make ... but/and I can't help but wonder about the connection.

      My thinking about math education and the relationship to oppression/liberation is prompted by looking recently at the resources of the Youth People's Project (such as the Flagway Game) started by Bob Moses vis a vis the Algebra Project.

      http://www.typp.org/

      Mission YPP uses Math Literacy Work to develop the abilities of elementary through high school students to succeed in school and in life, and in doing so involves them in efforts to eliminate institutional obstacles to their success.

      Vision YPP envisions a day when every young person — regardless of ethnicity, gender, or class — has access to a high quality education and the skills, attributes, and community support s/he needs to successfully meet the challenges of their generation.

    6. ti-blackness.

      and anti-everything-but-white-ness

    7. Practical Classroom Application

      Could this/does this open doors for a new hybrid research paradigm (or if it exists, please share)? I see practical parallels elements you might find in a Design Science) or similar approach.

    1. Most refugees have escaped extreme conflict and persecution abroad, but they may have little understanding of inequality in the United States. Schools should emphasize learning about America’s history of racism and oppression, because students may face the consequences of that history in their daily lives. Teachers can also give young people more active opportunities to engage with inequality, so that students are prepared to challenge discrimination as adults.

      This is a thread that runs through Pedagogy of the Oppressed and much of the Youth Action Research work that fascinates me.

    2. More broadly, Moussa’s school did not prepare him for the marginalization he would experience as a black, poor, non-Christian, non-native-born person in the United States. Moussa felt vulnerable.

      How can teachers help develop agency in students like Moussa while also showing them that there are paths to a non-traditional but manageable post-secondary education? This question can inform text selection in humanities classes and broader pedagogy design.

    3. Teachers have to be wary of the “false hope” that being successful in school will translate equally into livelihood opportunities for all students, according to a new paper by international education policy expert Sarah Dryden-Peterson and doctoral student Celia Reddick.

      This was a frustration of mine watching the new PBS documentary American Creed. There is a scene (19:00-23:00) in which a principal in a Tulsa elementary school talks about how her Native American students can grow up to be whatever they want at the same time she explains how many of the schools' families are trapped in a cycle of poverty, drug abuse, and incarceration. How long will that message ring true for these students given their surroundings? The principal, a Native American woman herself, is "living her American dream," in large part because her family owned land and struck oil.