19 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2021
    1. To get better at show and tell, start by being clear about the action that should flow from your problem solving and findings: the governing idea for change. Then find a way to present your logic visually so that the path to answers can be debated and embraced. Present the argument emotionally as well as logically, and show why the preferred action offers an attractive balance between risks and rewards. But don’t stop there. Spell out the risks of inaction, which often have a higher cost than imperfect actions have.

      Problem çözümü ve akış şemasını açık bir şekilde belirt.

      Anlaşılabilecek ve üstünde tartışılabilecek bir görsel şeklinde sun.

      Argümanı mantıki ve duygusal olarak sun

      Aksiyomun riskler ve ödüller arasında neden seçilebilir bir denge unsuru olduğunu ifade edin.

      Aksiyom almamanın sonuçlarını belirtin.

    2. The most elegant problem solving is that which makes the solution obvious. The late economist Herb Simon put it this way: “Solving a problem simply means representing it so as to make the solution transparent.” 10

      En iyi problem çözümü sorunu açıklayarak çözümü herkesçe görünür hale getirmektir.

    3. Good problem solving typically involves designing experiments to reduce key uncertainties. Each move provides additional information and builds capabilities.

      Problem çözme belirsizliği azaltmak için deneyler oluşturmayı ve her bir adım ile bilgi ve tecrübe edinmeyi sağlar.

    4. The secret to developing a dragonfly-eye view is to “anchor outside” rather than inside when faced with problems of uncertainty and opportunity. Take the broader ecosystem as a starting point. That will encourage you to talk with customers, suppliers, or, better yet, players in a different but related industry or space. Going through the customer journey with design-thinking in mind is another powerful way to get a 360-degree view of a problem. But take note: when decision makers face highly constrained time frames or resources, they may have to narrow the aperture and deliver a tight, conventional answer.
    5. Rookie problem solvers show you their analytic process and math to convince you they are clever. Seasoned problem solvers show you differently.

      Acemi problem çözücüler sizi matematik sürece boğarken diğer problem çözücüler farklı taraflarını gösterir.

    6. The secret to developing a dragonfly-eye view is to “anchor outside” rather than inside when faced with problems of uncertainty and opportunity. Take the broader ecosystem as a starting point. That will encourage you to talk with customers, suppliers, or, better yet, players in a different but related industry or space. Going through the customer journey with design-thinking in mind is another powerful way to get a 360-degree view of a problem. But take note: when decision makers face highly constrained time frames or resources, they may have to narrow the aperture and deliver a tight, conventional answer.

      Sorunla karşılaşıldığında dışarıya demirlemek dışarıdan bakmaya çalışmak sorunla ilgili sorunların ve alanları kontrol etmek daha geniş bir perspektif sağlayabilir.

    7. To embrace imperfectionism with epistemic humility, start by challenging solutions that imply certainty. You can do that in the nicest way by asking questions such as “What would we have to believe for this to be true?” This brings to the surface implicit assumptions about probabilities and makes it easier to assess alternatives. When uncertainty is high, see if you can make small moves or acquire information at a reasonable cost to edge out into a solution set. Perfect knowledge is in short supply, particularly for complex business and societal problems. Embracing imperfection can lead to more effective problem solving. It’s practically a must in situations of high uncertainty, such as the beginning of a problem-solving process or during an emergency.

      Bunun doğru olduğuna inanmamız için nelerin doğru olması gerekir sorusu temel yapı taşı durumundadır.

      Bu soru ile beraber örtük varsayımlar belirginleşir ve alternatif çözümler yüzeye çıkması kolaylaşır. Bu nedenle mükkemmeliyete ulaşmaktan ziyade kusuru benimsemek basarıya giden kapıyı aralayabilir.

    8. Recent research shows that we are better at solving problems when we think in terms of odds rather than certainties.

      Kesinlikler yerine olasılıklar üzerine düşünmemizin problem çözümlemede daha önemli olduğunu vurguluyor.

    9. One simple suggestion from author and economist Caroline Webb to generate more curiosity in team problem solving is to put a question mark behind your initial hypotheses or first-cut answers. This small artifice is surprisingly powerful: it tends to encourage multiple solution paths and puts the focus, correctly, on assembling evidence. We also like thesis/antithesis, or red team/blue team, sessions, in which you divide a group into opposing teams that argue against the early answers—typically, more traditional conclusions that are more likely to come from a conventional pattern. Why is this solution better? Why not that one? We’ve found that better results come from embracing uncertainty. Curiosity is the engine of creativity.

      Erken cevapların düşünce sürecini durdurmasını engellemek için ilerlemelerimizin sonuna bir soru işareti koyarak devam etmeye çalışabiliriz. Bu durum farklı çözüm ve varsayımlara ulaşmamıza yardımcı olabilir.

    10. Natural human biases in decision making, including confirmation, availability, and anchoring biases, often cause us to shut down the range of solutions too early.

      Bilişsel hatalar nedeniyle insan zihni çözüm bulma eğilimini en yakın noktada sona erdirme hatasını gerçekleştirmektedir. Daha iyi bir çözüme varmadan çözüm arama süreci sona ermektedir.

    11. Relentlessly ask, “Why is this so?” Unfortunately, somewhere between preschool and the boardroom, we tend to stop asking. Our brains make sense of massive numbers of data points by imposing patterns that have worked for us and other humans in the past. That’s why a simple technique, worth employing at the beginning of problem solving, is simply to pause and ask why conditions or assumptions are so until you arrive at the root of the problem.

      Neden böyle sorusunun sorulmaya devam edilmesi.

      Düşünmemizin önüne geçen önkabulleri ve inançların düşünme sürecimizi durdurmasına izin vermemiz gerekmektedir.

      Neden sorusunu , olguların ve durumların varsayımlarını sorgulamaya sorunun temeline inene kadar devam ettirmeliyiz.

  2. Apr 2021
    1. “I decided to look into it because [Proctorio has] claimed to have heard of ‘fewer than five’ instances where there were issues with face recognition due to race,” Akash Satheesan, the researcher, told Motherboard. “I knew that from anecdotes to be unlikely … so I set out to find some more conclusive proof and I think I’m fairly certain I did.” 

      Satheesan applied exactly the type of research-minded approach we strongly encourage college students to develop.

  3. Oct 2018
    1. discussion-based practices improve comprehension of the text and critical-thinking skills for students across ethnic backgrounds and socioeconomic contexts

      When students are allowed to talk out their thoughts to peers, they think more critically about the material. When they are forced to only think to themselves, then do an individual examination on their thoughts - it can become very narrow minded because they have no one else to bounce their ideas off of. We all do better when we can talk through something.

  4. Nov 2016
    1. Best piece I’ve seen on last week’s announcements.

      Gruber had linked to Michael Tsai’s roundup of the backlash, calling it “must-read stuff”. In this case, though, Gruber is “throwing his hat in the ring”. And the ring now feels like the site of a burgeoning flamewar. Issue is, here, that the “war” is happening about people who actually enjoy Apple’s products. This isn’t the “religious wars” between Macs and PCs or between Fandroids and Apple fanbois. It’s a whole argument between people who have been purchasing Apple computers and wanted updated ones. A well-known lesson from social psychology is that group polarization deepens divides by encouraging extreme positions. Chuq Von Rospach’s piece contains several comments which could be qualified as “extreme”. And it puts the blame on those who disagree. There are similar pieces on the other side of the equation, surely. Tsai’s roundup should make it possible to identify them. But Gruber has yet to link to them (apart from arguing about specific points like Tim Cook’s quote on the irrelevance of “PCs” and trying to set the record straight on Apple and Intel sharing responsibility for the 16GB limits on new top-of-the-line MacBook Pro desktop replacements).

      As an example of the effect of group polarization: my own perspective is that disappointment is real. Wasn’t impressed by what transpired from last week’s announcement. Feeling a bit more excited about the Microsoft Surface Studio than about the Touch Bar, but will likely not buy either any time soon. Because polarization forces me to take sides, my vote would go for the “there’s a serious problem, here”. Not saying Apple is doomed or that each of the problems discussed is a tragedy. But, to me, what is being thrown around sounds quite reasonable, not “trivial and petty”. Can’t be on Von Rospach’s side if that’s where the line is drawn. “You’re either with us or against us.” If you force me to choose, well, bye bye!

  5. Oct 2016
  6. Jul 2016
    1. Our research indicates that individuals exercise a great deal of critical evaluation of sources in non-academic contexts (as in the case of looking for good restaurants, or shopping for new cars, for instance). It may be of value to explore these personal evaluation practices with students, encouraging them to apply them in academic contexts.

      +1 Insightful

  7. Dec 2015
  8. Nov 2015
    1. digital literacy to see that these open textbooks have more credibility than, say, Wikipedia

      Well… Credibility is a tough thing and Wikipedia’s NPOV model does offer something early critical thinkers might find more appropriate to develop their skills than a biased textbook. Those of us who have used textbooks may feel that pain.

  9. Oct 2015
    1. If students use smartphones to copy and paste prefabricated answers to questions, it is unlikely to help them to become smarter.

      Asking questions which find easy answers online may exacerbate the problem, but the problem existed before the Internet.