29 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
  2. Sep 2020
  3. Aug 2020
    1. Nguyen, L. H., Drew, D. A., Graham, M. S., Joshi, A. D., Guo, C.-G., Ma, W., Mehta, R. S., Warner, E. T., Sikavi, D. R., Lo, C.-H., Kwon, S., Song, M., Mucci, L. A., Stampfer, M. J., Willett, W. C., Eliassen, A. H., Hart, J. E., Chavarro, J. E., Rich-Edwards, J. W., … Zhang, F. (2020). Risk of COVID-19 among front-line health-care workers and the general community: A prospective cohort study. The Lancet Public Health, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(20)30164-X

    1. More information about limitations and exceptions to copyright

      Under more information about limitations and exceptions to copyright add section titled Case Studies: Case studies provide valuable information relating to the state of affairs in various countries, as well as the opposing views when debating copyright issues.

      • South Africa: a case study of politics and the global economics of limitations and exceptions to copyright. The current debate in South Africa regarding proposed amendments to the Copyright Bill allows showcases the different sides of the debate, and how legal frameworks, e.g. the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa also informs decision making.
      1. US Government Threatening To Kill Free Trade With South Africa After Hollywood Complained It Was Adopting American Fair Use Principles, by Mike Masnick, 4 November 2019.
      2. South Africa’s Copyright Amendment Bill – one year on, by Denise Nicholson, 30 March 2020. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
      3. South Africa’s Copyright Amendment Bill Returned to Parliament for Further Consideration, Mike Palmedo, 22 June 2020. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
      4. See the light and pass the Copyright Amendment Bill, by Mugwena Maluleke, Tebogo Sithathu, Jack Devnarain, Tusi Fokane, Ben Cashdan and Jace Nair, 24 June 2020. © Mail & Guardian Online.
      5. South African President’s Reservations to Copyright Bill Not Supported by Law, by Sean Flynn, 13 July 2020. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

      For a comprehensive list of materials relating to the South African Copyright Amendment Bill processes, see Copyright and Related Issues: USTR GSP trade threats re: Bill, list compiled and amended by Denis Nicholson

  4. Jul 2020
    1. Meyer, B., Torriani, G., Yerly, S., Mazza, L., Calame, A., Arm-Vernez, I., Zimmer, G., Agoritsas, T., Stirnemann, J., Spechbach, H., Guessous, I., Stringhini, S., Pugin, J., Roux-Lombard, P., Fontao, L., Siegrist, C.-A., Eckerle, I., Vuilleumier, N., & Kaiser, L. (2020). Validation of a commercially available SARS-CoV-2 serological immunoassay. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2020.06.024

  5. Jun 2020
    1. Kempfert, K., Martinez, K., Siraj, A., Conrad, J., Fairchild, G., Ziemann, A., Parikh, N., Osthus, D., Generous, N., Del Valle, S., & Manore, C. (2020). Time Series Methods and Ensemble Models to Nowcast Dengue at the State Level in Brazil. ArXiv:2006.02483 [q-Bio, Stat]. http://arxiv.org/abs/2006.02483

  6. May 2020
  7. Apr 2020
    1. Qian’s comments reflected Luckin’s obsessive drive to overtake Starbucks, one of the most successful U.S. companies in China. Starbucks opened its first coffee shop in the country in 1999 and now has 4,300 of them. By the time of its initial public offering, not even two years after its founding, Luckin was more than halfway to matching the market leader.

      “We have done what most people do in 15 or 20 years,” Luckin Chief Financial Officer Reinout Schakel told CNBC on the morning of the Nasdaq debut.

      China consumes nine times as much tea as coffee, but Qian saw that statistic as an opportunity. According to an account in Xinhua, the official state news service, she was drinking more and more coffee during long hours at her previous job and grew interested in why coffee hadn’t caught on in China as in other countries and why its cost was so high.

      Until 2017, neither Qian nor Luckin’s chairman and largest shareholder, Charles Zhengyao Lu, had much to do with coffee shops. Lu studied industrial electric automation at the University of Science and Technology in Beijing and worked for the government in the northern city of Shijiazhuang for three years before getting the business itch. He started and ran a string of companies in information technology, telecommunications and automobile services.

      “Entrepreneurship is like a marathon without an end,” he said at an award ceremony for China’s biggest business names in 2016.

      His most successful venture at the time was CAR Inc., a car-rental company that had U.S. financing from Hertz and Warburg Pincus, the private equity firm. It listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange in 2014, and within eight months, its stock value had nearly doubled. The boom was short-lived — the share price dropped below its initial offering price by the beginning of 2016 — but by then Lu, along with Hertz and Warburg Pincus, had sold the bulk of their stakes.

      When Qian stepped up to the Nasdaq podium on May 17, 2019, Luckin had been in operation for just 20 months. Its $17 a share public offering raised another $645 million, and its underwriters included CICC, Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse.

      On January 7, the company said it had more than 4,500 stores, enough to overtake Starbucks in China.

      Howard Penney, an analyst for the online financial program Hedgeye Risk Management, summed up the optimism surrounding the company’s story line. On Jan. 15, he said that Starbucks would never be able to compete with Luckin in China, and might as well try to acquire it. Penney called Luckin “the most digitally savvy company in the world.”

      Two days later, Luckin’s stock hit its all-time high, just above $51 a share, pushing its market value past $12 billion.

      “China is to stock fraud,” he likes to say, “as Silicon Valley is to technology.”

    1. The company was founded as WeatherBill in 2006 by two former Google employees, David Friedberg and Siraj Khaliq. The company began as a startup focused on helping people and businesses manage and adapt to climate change, by providing weather insurance to ski resorts, large event venues, and farmers. In 2010 it decided to focus exclusively on agriculture, and launched the Total Weather Insurance Product in fall 2010 for corn and soybeans.[2][3] On October 11, 2011, WeatherBill changed its name to The Climate Corporation.[4] In June 2013 the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Risk Management Agency authorized the Climate Corporation to administer federal crop insurance policies for the 2014 crop year.[5] In October, 2013 Monsanto announced that it was acquiring the company for approximately $1.1 billion.[6]

      The Climate Corporation is a digital agriculture company that examines weather, soil and field data to help farmers determine potential yield-limiting factors in their fields.

      "That first year, in 2011, the Climate Corporation generated $60 million in sales, just from selling weather insurance to farmers. Three years later they were insuring 150 million acres of American farmland—the bulk of the Corn Belt—and teaching the farmers how to farm them more efficiently. Six years after venture capitalists valued David Friedberg’s new company at $6 million, Monsanto bought it for $1.1 billion." The Fifth Risk

    1. Great strategic investments + avoiding taxes + stiffing supplies with a longer payment cycle = cheaper capital + huge and growing FCF

      Free cash flow (yellow line) is a bit like profit, except it doesn’t assume that Amazon has to pay for everything in the same time frame it sells it. And thanks to how Amazon’s payment cycle works, it usually gets money for selling an item long before it has to pay for that item. Last quarter, for example, it took Walmart on average two days to receive payment for goods after it paid its suppliers, while Amazon on average received payment 20 days before it paid its suppliers, according to cash conversion cycle data from the financial research platform Sentieo.

      Amazon keeps profit and free cash flows artificially low by investing money right back into its business in the form of capital expenses, like building data centers, upgrading distribution networks, and creating wind and solar farms. It can do so without having to borrow money, which means it won’t incur interest costs.

    1. Quite long but plenty of amazing advice in here from the founders of Looker (acquired by Google)

      “My biggest piece of advice to early-stage founders on fundraising is don't try to raise money too early,” says Tabb. “I see so many founders out there trying to raise with just an idea on a slide. We waited almost a year to raise money, until we knew it was a venture business — not every startup is, and you don’t want to get locked in. We were cranking along with customers and revenue. And it wasn’t all nailed down, but we had figured out enough of how go-to-market might work to know that it was workable. That made our seed raise in the summer of 2012 so much easier. If you build value, it takes the fundraising process from how good you are at pitching yourself to a place where you can simply say ‘Ask the people who are using us for their opinion about it.’”

      As the investor on the receiving end of that fundraising tactic, Trenchard agrees that it was effective. “When we were deciding whether or not to invest in their seed round, Lloyd sent me a list of 10 customer references — many of them were First Round-backed companies. I talked to each and every one during diligence, and I was blown away. The love they had for the products was off the charts, they would have been very disappointed without it,” says Trenchard.

      Learning a new language. “I created LookML to serve as the basis of our platform. It’s an abstraction layer, the sequel to SQL. My thought was that if we could simplify the problems with SQL and evolve the data language, it would be easier to use,” says Tabb. But banking on data analysts learning a new language was anything but a surefire move. “This was a scary one,” says Porterfield. “I remember those early existential questions: ‘Can analysts learn this language? Will they want to?’ Looking back now, it seems more obvious that developer-style tooling and workflows would be embraced. These days, there’s a lot of discussion that any time you can provide tools that increase someone’s leverage, they will adopt them. But that wasn’t clear at the time.”

      “For most companies in the data space, pre-sales folks are like plumbers, they're just hooking stuff together. We tried to take a different approach at Looker by asking prospects for a dataset and then putting economics or math majors to work. In the early days, they wore all the hats: They were pre-sales, post-sales, customer support. Eventually, those became separate roles as we scaled,” says Bien.

      “In the early days, Margaret had a habit of saying ‘We'll be successful when we have 1,000 true fans.’ That was our driving force — figuring out how to build a fanbase in enterprise software,” says Tabb. “If you make a product that customers love, your customers will love you back. It may seem cheesy, but it was really about love — that’s the emotion we wanted to evoke in our customers. We call customer success our ‘Department of Customer Love.’ We made ‘Love Looker Love’ one of our values. I had early customers tell me that life at their company was now divided into two eras: ‘Before Looker’ and ‘After Looker.’ That’s the reaction we were always chasing,” he says.

      “Back in my college days, I was really into the ideas of Robert Greenleaf, who kicked off the concept of servant leadership. Today, as a CEO, that philosophy carries forward — I view myself as a steward,” says Bien. “My role is to remove obstacles for other people and remove ownership for myself.”

    1. They built the brand initially by using targeted Google search ads and marketing on Facebook; they eschewed television adverts, which they could not afford anyway. But the most important channel for building the brand was Instagram, the photo-sharing app. Halo Top gave free samples to thousands of “influencers” — athletes, gym trainers and healthy-living gurus — with a critical mass of followers the company thought might like the product. “We were constantly reaching out to people to try to get the word out about Halo Top,” explains Bouton.

      A viral news story in early 2016 was a catalyst for the brand: a science journalist for GQ magazine ate nothing but Halo Top for 10 days and lost more than 4kg. Sales took off.

    1. An online-only sportswear retailer that targets younger customers, it doubled annual sales this year and last, taking its turnover to about £200m.

      PwC will be its strategic adviser to help bring in external funding, which could include either the sale of an equity stake or debt.

      The company was founded in 2012 but now employs more than 400 people. It sells to 180 countries from its headquarters in Solihull, competing with brands like Nike and Under Armour.

      It has no high street presence and does not use traditional marketing, promoting the brand instead through events and a network of social media health and fitness “influencers” with large numbers of followers.

      The company is aiming to raise more than £100m, according to those familiar with the process, but will work with PwC over the next few months to decide what it needs. Until now, the business has funded its expansion from cash flow and has no debt on its balance sheet.

      Ben Francis, who founded the company as a student in Birmingham to sell the sort of affordable gym wear he was looking to buy, said it generated about half its sales in the US. He wants to keep the focus on North America for the next stage of its growth.

  8. Feb 2020
    1. Introduction

      The first two sentences briefly summarise the scenario; the last sentence of the paragraph highlights the problem -- the topic to be elaborated in the subsequent section.

  9. Nov 2019
    1. We’re excited to announce that The Francis Crick Institute have partnered with our portfolio companies Symplectic and Figshare to enable richer profiles for their researchers and to make it easier for them to publish their papers and data Open Access.

  10. Jan 2019
  11. wendynorris.com wendynorris.com
    1. For our research design, we drew on Walsham [33] and Klein and Myers [13],who provide comprehensive guidelines on how to conduct interpretive case studyresearch in the IS domain.

      Bookmarked as a reminder to get these papers which could be helpful for the participatory design study.

  12. Nov 2018
  13. Feb 2017
    1. In fact the photosynthetic rate achieved with the two light qualities combined could be 30–40% higher than the sum of the rates in far-red or shorter red when measured separately (Emerson et al. 1957).

      This could be an important experiment to use as a case study.