538 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Aug 2022
    1. Other versions which are available are:

      Another PDF from CERN, but this one what looks like a PDF of the original as a first-class digital document, i.e., not a scan of a paper copy: https://cds.cern.ch/record/369245/files/dd-89-001.pdf

  3. Jul 2022
    1. . I thinkit’s often an issue for people when they first become note-makers: an anxiety about getting the “right” stuff out ofa book, or even “all the stuff”. I don’t think this iscompletely possible, and I think it’s increasingly lesspossible, the better the book.

      In the 1400s-1600s it was a common desire to excerpt all the value of books and attempts were made, though ultimately futile. This seems to be a commonly occurring desire.


      Often having a simple synopsis and notes isn't as useful as it may not spark the same sort of creativity and juxtaposition of ideas a particular reader might have had with their own context.


      Some have said that "content is king". I've previously thought that "context is king". Perhaps content and context end up ruling as joint monarchs.

    2. Engage with the idea and comment or elaborateon it in a Point Note.

      Dan Allosso's definition of a point note.

      This is roughly equivalent to permanent notes or evergreen notes in Ahrens or Matuschak's frameworks respectively. Somehow I like what seems like a broader feel here, thought the name

      Does this version contain within it the idea of growth or evolution over time? Evergreen note in Matuschak's version does, though the word evergreen stemming from the journalism space would indicate an idea that doesn't evolve over time but is simply reusable or republishable with little or no work. The linguistic link to evergreen articles in the journalism space creates cognitive dissonance for me in calling notes evergreen. Evergreen connotes reusability, which is useful, but ideas should have the ability to evolve and procreate with other ideas.

    1. But it's not a trivial problem. I have compiled, at latest reckoning, 35,669 posts - my version of a Zettelkasten. But how to use them when writing a paper? It's not straightforward - and I find myself typically looking outside my own notes to do searches on Google and elsewhere. So how is my own Zettel useful? For me, the magic happens in the creation, not in the subsequent use. They become grist for pattern recognition. I don't find value in classifying them or categorizing them (except for historical purposes, to create a chronology of some concept over time), but by linking them intuitively to form overarching themes or concepts not actually contained in the resources themselves. But this my brain does, not my software. Then I write a paper (or an outline) based on those themes (usually at the prompt of an interview, speaking or paper invitation) and then I flesh out the paper by doing a much wider search, and not just my limited collection of resources.

      Stephen Downes describes some of his note taking process for creation here. He doesn't actively reuse his notes (or in this case blog posts, bookmarks, etc.) which number a sizeable 35669, directly, at least in the sort of cut and paste method suggested by Sönke Ahrens. Rather he follows a sort of broad idea, outline creation, and search plan akin to that described by Cory Doctorow in 20 years a blogger

      Link to: - https://hyp.is/_XgTCm9GEeyn4Dv6eR9ypw/pluralistic.net/2021/01/13/two-decades/


      Downes suggests that the "magic happens in the creation" of his notes. He uses them as "grist for pattern recognition". He doesn't mention words like surprise or serendipity coming from his notes by linking them, though he does use them "intuitively to form overarching themes or concepts not actually contained in the resources themselves." This is closely akin to the broader ideas ensconced in inventio, Llullan Wheels, triangle thinking, ideas have sex, combinatorial creativity, serendipity (Luhmann), insight, etc. which have been described by others.


      Note that Downes indicates that his brain creates the links and he doesn't rely on his software to do this. The break is compounded by the fact that he doesn't find value in classifying or categorizing his notes.


      I appreciate that Downes uses the word "grist" to describe part of his note taking practice which evokes the idea of grinding up complex ideas (the grain) to sort out the portions of the whole to find simpler ideas (the flour) which one might use later to combine to make new ideas (bread, cake, etc.) Similar analogies might be had in the grain harvesting space including winnowing or threshing.

      One can compare this use of a grist mill analogy of thinking with the analogy of the crucible, which implies a chamber or space in which elements are brought together often with work or extreme conditions to create new products by their combination.

      Of course these also follow the older classical analogy of imitating the bees (apes).

    1. https://herman.bearblog.dev/a-better-ranking-algorithm/

    2. The most common way is to log the number of upvotes (or likes/downvotes/angry-faces/retweets/poop-emojis/etc) and algorithmically determine the quality of a post by consensus.

      When thinking about algorithmic feeds, one probably ought to not include simple likes/favorites/bookmarks as they're such low hanging fruit. Better indicators are interactions which take time, effort, work to post.

      Using various forms of webmention as indicators could be interesting as one can parse responses and make an actual comment worth more than a dozen "likes", for example.

      Curating people (who respond) as well as curating the responses themselves could be useful.

      Time windowing curation of people and curators could be a useful metric.

      Attempting to be "democratic" in these processes may often lead to the Harry and Mary Beercan effect and gaming issues seen in spaces like Digg or Twitter and have dramatic consequences for the broader readership and community. Democracy in these spaces is more likely to get you cat videos and vitriol with a soupçon of listicles and clickbait.

    1. // NB: Since line terminators can be the multibyte CRLF sequence, care // must be taken to ensure we work for calls where `tokenPosition` is some // start minus 1, where that "start" is some line start itself.

      I think this satisfies the threshold of "minimum viable publication". So write this up and reference it here.

      Full impl.:

      getLineStart(tokenPosition, anteTerminators = null) {
        if (tokenPosition > this._edge && tokenPosition != this.length) {
          throw new Error("random access too far out"); // XXX
        }
      
        // NB: Since line terminators can be the multibyte CRLF sequence, care
        // must be taken to ensure we work for calls where `tokenPosition` is some
        // start minus 1, where that "start" is some line start itself.
        for (let i = this._lineTerminators.length - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
          let current = this._lineTerminators[i];
          if (tokenPosition >= current.position + current.content.length) {
            if (anteTerminators) {
              anteTerminators.push(...this._lineTerminators.slice(0, i));
            }
            return current.position + current.content.length;
          }
        }
      
        return 0;
      }
      

      (Inlined for posterity, since this comes from an uncommitted working directory.)

    1. The 1,000 True Fans theory is classic Kevin Kelly. He took something potentially dark—in this case, a long-tail economic model that mashes creatives like a digital-age ore crusher—and found an aspirational alternative narrative.
    1. the idea of a thoughts page was originated by maren, who made a script for generating thoughts pages. thoughts.page is a way of lowering the barrier of entry to putting thoughts on the internet for people who don't want to or don't know how to set up a script to do it.

      Good use case for the application of the principles in A New Publishing Discipline.

    1. Primary program modules

      This is sort of a failing of the code-as-content thing that we're going for here. Take a page from GPE.

  4. Jun 2022
    1. We’ve been conditioned to view information through aconsumerist lens: that more is better, without limit.
    2. If you want to write a book, you could dial down the scope andwrite a series of online articles outlining your main ideas. If youdon’t have time for that, you could dial it down even further andstart with a social media post explaining the essence of yourmessage.

      This does make me wonder again, how much of this particular book might be found in various forms on Forte's website, much of which is behind a paywall at $10 a month or $100 a year?

      It's become more common in the past decades for writers to turn their blogs into books and then use their platform to sell those books.

    3. inany piece of content, the value is not evenly distributed

      The value of any given piece of content is not evenly distributed. Different people will get different things out of any particular piece. This is why the "holy grail" of universal note taking or excerpting will fail at mass scale.

      Similarly, many non-fiction books also print their small handful of insights on their jacket covers, so one needn't necessarily read the entire book to get the gist of what it will present.

    1. User participation in any online internet community generally follows the 90-9-1 rule:90% of community members are lurkers who read or observe, but don’t contribute9% of community members edit or respond to content but don’t create content of their own1% of community members create new content
    1. She briefly notes the idea of “content resisters,” who might consume vinyl records and photocopied zines instead of Spotify and Instagram.

      content resisters

    2. “The more you use the Internet, the more your individuality warps into a brand, and your subjectivity transforms into an algorithmically plottable vector of activity.”
    3. Eichhorn uses the potent term “content capital”—a riff on Pierre Bourdieu’s “cultural capital”—to describe the way in which a fluency in posting online can determine the success, or even the existence, of an artist’s work. Where “cultural capital” describes how particular tastes and reference points confer status, “content capital” connotes an aptitude for creating the kind of ancillary content that the Internet feeds upon.

      content capital

  5. May 2022
    1. What does it look like to move from mindless consumption tomindful creation?

      Collecting ideas and creating links between them in a zettelkasten can seemingly solve this problem with "little" work. :)

    1. a society-wide hyperconversation. This hyperconversation operationalizes continuous discourse, including its differentiation and emergent framing aspects. It aims to assist people in developing their own ways of framing and conceiving the problem that makes sense given their social, cultural, and environmental contexts. As depicted in table 1, the hyperconversation also reflects a slower, more deliberate approach to discourse; this acknowledges damaged democratic processes and fractured societal social cohesion. Its optimal design would require input from other relevant disciplines and expertise,

      The public Indyweb is eminently designed as a public space for holding deep, continuous, asynchronous conversations with provenance. That is, if the partcipant consents to public conversation, ideas can be publicly tracked. Whoever reads your public ideas can be traced.and this paper trail is immutably stored, allowing anyone to see the evolution of ideas in real time.

      In theory, this does away with the need for patents and copyrights, as all ideas are traceable to the contributors and each contribution is also known. This allows for the system to embed crowdsourced microfunding, supporting the best (upvoted) ideas to surface.

      Participants in the public Indyweb ecosystem are called Indyviduals and each has their own private data hub called an Indyhub. Since Indyweb is interpersonal computing, each person is the center of their indyweb universe. Through the discoverability built into the Indyweb, anything of immediate salience is surfaced to your private hub. No applications can use your data unless you give exact permission on which data to use and how it shall be used. Each user sets the condition for their data usage. Instead of a user's data stored in silos of servers all over the web as is current practice, any data you generate, in conversation, media or data files is immediately accessible on your own Indyhub.

      Indyweb supports symmathesy, the exchange of ideas based on an appropriate epistemological model that reflects how human INTERbeings learn as a dynamic interplay between individual and collective learning. Furthermore, all data that participants choose to share is immutably stored on content addressable web3 storage forever. It is not concentrated on any server but the data is stored on the entire IPFS network:

      "IPFS works through content adddressibility. It is a peer-to-peer (p2p) storage network. Content is accessible through peers located anywhere in the world, that might relay information, store it, or do both. IPFS knows how to find what you ask for using its content address rather than its location.

      There are three fundamental principles to understanding IPFS:

      Unique identification via content addressing Content linking via directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) Content discovery via distributed hash tables (DHTs)" (Source: https://docs.ipfs.io/concepts/how-ipfs-works/)

      The privacy, scalability, discoverability, public immutability and provenance of the public Indyweb makes it ideal for supporting hyperconversations that emerge tomorrows collectively emergent solutions. It is based on the principles of thought augmentation developed by computer industry pioneers such as Doug Englebart and Ted Nelson who many decades earlier in their prescience foresaw the need for computing tools to augment thought and provide the ability to form Network Improvement Communities (NIC) to solve a new generation of complex human challenges.

    1. https://www.niemanlab.org/2022/05/reader-comments-on-news-sites-we-want-to-hear-what-your-publication-does/

      I'm curious if any publications have experimented with the W3C webmention spec for notifications as a means of handling comments? Coming out of the IndieWeb movement, Webmention allows people to post replies to online stories on their own websites (potentially where they're less like to spew bile and hatred in public) and send notifications to the article that they've mentioned them. The receiving web page (an article, for example) can then choose to show all or even a portion of the response in the page's comments section). Other types of interaction beyond comments can also be supported here including receiving "likes", "bookmarks", "reads" (indicating that someone actually read the article), etc. There are also tools like Brid.gy which bootstrap Webmention onto social media sites like Twitter to make them send notifications to an article which might have been mentioned in social spaces. I've seen many personal sites supporting this and one or two small publications supporting it, but I'm as yet unaware of larger newspapers or magazines doing so.

    2. The Seattle Times turns off comments on “stories that are of a sensitive nature,” said Michelle Matassa Flores, executive editor of The Seattle Times. “People can’t behave on any story that has to do with race.” Comments are turned off on stories about race, immigration, and crime, for instance.

      The Seattle Times turns off comments on stories about race, immigration, and crime because as their executive editor Michelle Matassa Flores says, "People can't behave on any story that has to do with race."

    1. Unlike conventional blogs which are read-only this blog contains active code, so you can click on any of the links in this tiddler and see the code and see how the system behaves.
    1. Manton says owning your domain so you can move your content without breaking URLs is owning your content, whereas I believe if your content still lives on someone else's server, and requires them to run the server and run their code so you can access your content, it's not really yours at all, as they could remove your access at any time.

      This is a slippery slope problem, but people are certainly capable of taking positions along a broad spectrum here.

      The one thing I might worry about--particularly given micro.blog's--size is the relative bus factor of one represented by Manton himself. If something were to happen to him, what recourse has he built into make sure that people could export their data easily and leave the service if the worst were to come to happen? Is that documented somewhere?

      Aside from this the service has one of the most reasonable turn-key solutions for domain and data ownership I've seen out there without running all of your own infrastructure.

    2. First, Manton's business model is for users to not own their content. You might be able to own your domain name, but if you have a hosted Micro.blog blog, the content itself is hosted on Micro.blog servers, not yours. You can export your data, or use an RSS feed to auto-post it to somewhere you control directly, but if you're not hosting the content yourself, how does having a custom domain equal self-hosting your content and truly owning it? Compared to hosting your own blog and auto-posting it to Micro.blog, which won't cost you and won't make Micro.blog any revenue, posting for a hosted blog seems to decrease your ownership.

      I'm not sure that this is the problem that micro.blog is trying to solve. It's trying to solve the problem of how to be online as simply and easily as possible without maintaining the overhead of hosting and managing your own website.

      As long as one can easily export their data at will and redirect their domain to another host, one should be fine. In some sense micro.blog makes it easier than changing phone carriers, which in most cases will abandon one's text messages without jumping through lots of hoops. .

      One step that micro.blog could set up is providing a download dump of all content every six months to a year so that people have it backed up in an accessible fashion. Presently, to my knowledge, one could request this at any time and move when they wished.

    1. Matt Taibbi asked his subscribers in April. Since they were “now functionally my editor,” he was seeking their advice on potential reporting projects. One suggestion — that he write about Ibram X. Kendi and Robin DiAngelo — swiftly gave way to a long debate among readers over whether race was biological.

      There's something here that's akin to the idea of bikeshedding? Online communities flock to the low lying ideas upon which they can proffer an opinion and play at the idea of debate. If they really cared, wouldn't they instead delve into the research and topics themselves? Do they really want Taibbi's specific take? Do they want or need his opinion on the topic? What do they really want?

      Compare and cross reference this with the ideas presented by Ibram X. Kendi's article There Is No Debate Over Critical Race Theory.

      Are people looking for the social equivalent of a simple "system one" conversation or are they ready, willing, and able to delve into a "system two" presentation?

      Compare this also with the modern day version of the Sunday morning news (analysis) shows? They would seem to be interested in substantive policy and debate, but they also require a lot of prior context to participate. In essence, most speakers don't actually engage, but spew out talking points instead and rely on gut reactions and fear, uncertainty and doubt to make their presentations. What happened to the actual discourse? Has there been a shift in how these shows work and present since the rise of the Hard Copy sensationalist presentation? Is the competition for eyeballs weakening these analysis shows?

      How might this all relate to low level mansplaining as well? What are men really trying to communicate in demonstrating this behavior? What do they gain in the long run? What is the evolutionary benefit?

      All these topics seem related somehow within the spectrum of communication and what people look for and choose in what and how they consume content.

    1. My argument for the use of the Web as a medium for publishing the procedures by which the documents from a given authority are themselves published shares something in common with the argument for exploiting Lisp's homoiconicity to represent a program as a data structure that is expressed like any other list.

      There are traces here as well from the influence of the von Neumann computational model, where programs and data are not "typed" such that they belong to different "classes" of storage—they are one and the same.

    1. the process for putting something on the internet to just be a git push and trust that the machine will just take care of it
    1. Are you limited to PHP?

      No, but further: the question (about being "limited") presupposes something that isn't true.

      If you're doing PHP here, you're doing it wrong—unless the PHP application is written with great care (i.e. unidiomatically) and has some way to reveal its own program text (as first-class content). Otherwise, that's a complete failure to avoid the "elsewhere"-ness that we're trying to eradicate.

    2. who hosts that?

      Answer: it's hosted under the same auspices as the main content. The "editor" is first-class content (in the vein of ANPD); it's really just another document describing detailed procedures for how the site gets updated.

    1. the former allows me to give an URL to a piece of code

      But you're not! When you wield PHP like this, there is no URL for the piece of code per se—only its (potentially fleeting) output—unless you take special care to make that piece of code available as content otherwise. PHP snippets are just as deserving of a minted identifier issued for them as, say, JS and CSS resources are—perhaps even just as deserving as the content being served up on the site, but PHP actually discourages this.

  6. Apr 2022
    1. Most content is typically displayed in these formats:


      What other forms/shapes might it take?

    2. It is always about the new The frontpage of any content-driven media is often geared towards the latest happenings. But what if there are old gems hidden beyond? A new user wouldn’t be able to discover them.

      Older content may broadly be considered more valuable than newer content. The fact that it has been "tried and true" gives it enormously more value than newer and untested content.

      Newer content is primarily valuable solely because it is new. How much of it will live on to become old content without falling off of the long tail of the value distribution?

      Link this to the idea of imitation > innovation in Annie Murphy Paul's book The Extended Mind.

      Link this to the fact that NASA uses 30+ year old software and systems in their outer-space program because all the glitches and bugs have been found and it's far more reliable.


      Finding the older gems has generally been the sort of driving idea behind @peterhagen and his https://lindylearn.io/ site -- particularly his Hacker News tool.

    1. My "map of content" for Java Collection Framework. Obsidian & Excalidraw make learning programming language full of joy! Great thanks to @obsdmd @zsviczian

      My "map of content" for Java Collection Framework. Obsidian & Excalidraw make learning programming language full of joy!<br><br>Great thanks to @obsdmd @zsviczian pic.twitter.com/FWBxfj2yLS

      — YM (@Peng1M) April 22, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      Note the use of scare quotes around "map of content". Is it because YM doesn't take the idea seriously or because of the pseudo map nature of the diagram included?

      Link to the idea that map of content is just a marketing term for something which already exists, namely a table of contents.

      It's also similar to the projects idea and outlines espoused by Sönke Ahrens.

    1. This appeal would have a greater effect if it weren't itself published in a format that exhibits so much of what was less desirable of the pre-modern Web—fixed layouts that show no concern for how I'm viewing this page and causes horizontal scrollbars, overly stylized MySpace-ish presentation, and a general imposition of the author's preferences and affinity for kitsch above all else—all things that we don't want.

      I say this as someone who is not a fan of the trends in the modern Web. Responsive layouts and legible typography are not casualties of the modern Web, however. Rather, they exhibit the best parts of its maturation. If we can move the Web out of adolescence and get rid of the troublesome aspects, we'd be doing pretty good.

  7. Mar 2022
    1. Many of the items in the docuverse are not static, run-of-the-mill materials, i.e. unformatted text, graphics, database files, or whatever. They are, in fact, executable programs, materials that from a docuverse perspective can be viewed as Executable Documents (EDs). Such programs run the gamut from the simplest COBOL or C program to massive expert systems and FORTRAN programs. Since the docuverse address scheme allows us to link documents at will, we can link together compiled code, source code, and descriptive material in hypertext fashion. Now, if, in addition, we can prepare and link to an executable document an Input-Output Document (IOD), a document specifying a program's input and output requirements and behavior, and an RWI describing the IOD, we can entertain the notion of integrating data and programs that were not originally designed to work together.
    1. With Hypothesis, you can add suggestions and additions as an overlay on current content easily and quickly.  For example, you can provide proper citations or additional information on a topic, note grammatical errors or factual inaccuracies. Experienced Wikipedia editors can then follow up and work with you to add your recommendations to the article.

      The problem with this, generally, but esp. affecting wikis in particular, is that you end up with orphaned and irrelevant/out-of-date annotations.

      Hypothes.is should select an appropriate link relation (in the vein of what it now does with canonical) and scope the annotation appropriately—even if the user does not actually have his or her browser pointed at the exact revision that is "current".

  8. Feb 2022
    1. This URL is referenced by Ted himself in his upload (to the Internet Archive) of the seminar "Hard and Fast Thoughts for a Softcopy World":

      <https://archive.org/details/HardAndFastThoughts1966>

      Meanwhile, a copy has already been available through IA, too:

      <https://archive.org/details/nelson-file-structure>

      (...albeit uploaded independently by Erica Fischer and not Ted.)

    1. on top stacked laying flat on the left side, next to a potted plant on the right two other books to the right of the plant, spines not visible

      tools for thought rheingold MIT Press logo concept design: the essence of software jackson designing constructionist futures nathan holbert, matthew berland, and yasmin b. kafai, editors MIT Press logo structure and interpretation of computer programs second edition abelson and sussman MIT Press Indroduction to the theory of computation

      top shelf ordinary orientation: books upright, spines facing out tops leaning to the left

      toward a theory of instruction bruner belknap / harvard tools for conviviality ivan illich harper & row the human interface raskin addison wesley the design of everyday things don norman basic books changing minds disessa MIT Press logo mindstorms seymour papert unknown logo understanding computers and cognition winograd and flores addison wesley software abstraction jackson revised edition MIT Press logo living with complexity norman MIT Press logo the art of doing science and engineering—learning to learn richard w. hamming stripe press logo the computer boys take over ensmenger recoding gender abbate MIT Press logo weaving the web tim berners-lee harper dealers of lightning: xerox parc and the dawn of the computer age michael a hiltik harper the dream machine m. mitchell waldrop stripe press logo from counterculture to cyberculture fred turner chicago the innovators walter isaacson simon & schuster paperbacks a people's history of computing in the united states joy lisi rankin harvard the media lab stewart brand penguin logo

      bottom shelf ordinary orientation: books upright, spines facing out tops leaning to the right

      about face: the essentials of interaction design cooper, reimann, cronin, noessel 4th edition wiley the new media reader wardrip, fruin, and montfort, editors designing interactions bill moggridge includes DVD MIT Press logo interactive programming environments barstow, shrobe, sanderwall mcgraw hill visual programming shu software visualization editors: stasko, domingue, brown, price MIT Press logo types and programming languages pierce MIT Press logo smalltalk-80: the interactive programming environment goldberg addison wesley constructing the user... statecharts qa 76.9 .u83 h66 1999 the human use of human beings: cybernetics and society wiener da capo pasteur's quadrant stokes brookings scientific freedom: the elixir of civilization donald w. braben stripe press logo a pattern language alexander, ishikawa, silverstein, jacobson, fiksdahl-king, angel oxford the timeless way of building alexander oxford

    1. And here’s a photo of my computing bookshelf as of November 2020, with some of the books that have influenced me the most:

      Not accessible.

  9. Jan 2022
    1. A Mental Squeeze Point is when your unsorted knowledge becomes so messy it overwhelms and discourages you. Either you are equipped with frameworks to overcome the squeeze point, or you are discouraged and possibly abandon your project.

      Cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/BuMcAnr4EeyxO-PwNBfPrg (Dan Allosso's analogy about the Kuiper Belt)

    1. Three types of linking can be distinguished:a) References in the context of a larger structural outline: When beginning a major line of thoughtLuhmann sometimes noted on the first card several of the aspects to be addressed and marked themby a capital letter that referred to a card (or set of consecutive cards) that was numbered accordinglyand placed at least in relative proximity to the card containing the outline. This structure comesclosest to resembling the outline of an article or the table of contents of a book and therefore doesn’treally use the potentials of the collection as a web of notes.b) Collective references: At the beginning of a section devoted to a specific subject area, one can oftenfind a card that refers to a number of other cards in the collection that have some connection withthe subject or concept addressed in that section. A card of this kind can list up to 25 references andwill typically specify the respective subject or concept in addition to the number. These referencescan indicate cards that are related by subject matter and in close proximity or to cards that are farapart in other sections of the collection, the latter being the normal case.c) Single references: At a particular place in a normal note Luhmann often made a reference to anothercard in the collection that was also relevant to the special argument in question; in most cases the re

      ferred card is located at an entirely different place in the file, frequently in the context of a completely different discussion or subject.

      Niklas Luhmann's index card system had three different types of links. Direct links to individual notes, outlines with links to cards (similar to tables of contents or maps of content), and what Schmidt (2018) refers to as "collective references". These collective references sound a lot like search queries for related topics that have links to a variety of resources/cards related to a particular topic and sound like a table of contents, but without a specific hierarchy.

    1. the creation, publication, and governance of useful, usable content.

      This is a great compact definition of what Content Innovation is about (in a narrower domain).

    1. This template is available for 100% free of charge on TemplateMo. Download, modify and use this for your business website.

      Learn how AOBG can equip you with a wide range of premium products and quality tools to help build your book of business.

    1. The mere scribe and the mere compiler have disappeared (almost completely), and the mere commentator has become very rare. Each exists only insofar as any author in creating his own work cannot do without some copying, some compiling (or research), and some commenting.

      The digital era has made copying (scriptor) completely redundant. The click of a button allows the infinite copying of content.

      Real compilators are few and far between, but exist in niches. Within social media many are compiling and tagging content within their accounts.

      Commentators are a dime a dozen and have been made ubiquitous courtesy of social media.

      Content creators or auctors still exist, but are rarer in the broader field of writing or other contexts.

  10. Dec 2021
    1. Edge computing is an emerging new trend in cloud data storage that improves how we access and process data online. Businesses dealing with high-frequency transactions like banks, social media companies, and online gaming operators may benefit from edge computing.

      Edge Computing: What It Is and Why It Matters0 https://en.itpedia.nl/2021/12/29/edge-computing-what-it-is-and-why-it-matters/ Edge computing is an emerging new trend in cloud data storage that improves how we access and process data online. Businesses dealing with high-frequency transactions like banks, social media companies, and online gaming operators may benefit from edge computing.

    1. The final keystone was when the program that a computer runs was moved to where the data is stored, rather than being represented or input physically. This effectively created what we now know of as software. Obvious in hindsight, yet almost impossible to see from the past’s vantage point.

      Good way to describe ANPD.

    1. First, I go to existing structure notes. They are notes about notes, and therefore they map structures in my archive.

      Structure notes are notes about notes. Sounds similar to Maps of Content (MoC) or Tables of Contents in some sense. No one seems to have a strong or consistent name for this practice.

  11. Nov 2021
    1. Quando è consigliato postare su linkedin?

      • Il consiglio è di postare in questi giorni:
        • Martedì;
        • Giovedì;
        • Sabato; Gli orari in cui è consigliato pubblicare sono compresi tra le 8 e le 10 Una volta pubblicato il contenuto, linkedin lo mostrerà ad un gruppo di utenti in test A seconda dell'engagement di questo gruppo di test nel corso delle 2 ore successive alla pubblicazione allora la copertura del post aumenterà o diminuirà.

      In termini di metriche è più importante portare le persone a cliccare sul tasto "Visualizza altro" invece che sul "consiglia" o qualche altra reazione. Per questo è necessario scrivere post della lunghezza di 1200-2000 caratteri. La metrica più importante è quindi quella del "dwell time", quella che indica quanto tempo le persone passano sul proprio post e che deve essere il più alto possibile (per questo è necessario aumentare questa metrica utilizzando formati adatti come il carosello, i video, i post lunghi ecc)

      Altra metrica molto più importante della reazione è il commento. Il commento è 4 volte più forte di una delle reazioni più semplici ed è 7 volte più potente se tale commento è dato nelle prime due ore.

      L'impatto di lasciare un commento di più di 5 parole risulterà in un +8% per chi ha creato il post e del +6% per la persona che ha commentato. Se la prima persona che lascia il primo commento è quella che ha scritto il post allora la copertura decresce di un ammontare tra il -45% ed il -20%.

      Riguardo la modalità creatore, questa aiuta e non aiuta a fare cose: non aumenta la copertura dei tuoi post; sposta la copertura dai tuoi collegamenti ai tuoi follower; aumenta la copertura dei tuoi contenuti se i tuoi contenuti contengono gli hashtag che hai definito nel tuo profilo. riduce il numero di richieste di collegamento verso di te del triplo

      Se contribuisci in maniera coinvolta coi contenuti dei tuoi collegamenti allora anche i tuoi post avranno più engagement.

      Il numero ideale di hashtag da utilizzare nei tuoi post è tra i 3 ed i 5 Inoltre è consigliato utilizzare un personal hashtag

  12. Oct 2021
    1. COPE

      Create Once, Publish Everywhere

      So when I talk about adaptive content, I popularized a case study from NPR in which they outlined their catchily-named approach to publishing web content, which they called COPE. It stands for Create Once, Publish Everywhere. And in NPR’s model, they maintain a single content model for their article form. So in this content structure, they would have for an article a title, a short title, a teaser, a short teaser, several images attached to the article, an audio file, the body text, whatever metadata was attached to the article, and they could serve up a different combination of that more granular content based on the type of device someone was using.

    2. Adaptive: Content, Context, and Controversy
    1. For myself, Symphony was a proving ground for the COPE approach to content strategy and content management championed by Karen McGrane: create once publish everywhere.
    1. COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

      Adaptive Content

      COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

      With the growing need and ability to be portable comes tremendous opportunity for content providers. But it also requires substantial changes to their thinking and their systems.

  13. getuikit.com getuikit.com
    1. WordPress & Joomla from the UIkit creators

      Run for Water

      I used one of these themes for the redesign of the Run for Water site. I transitioned away from Jamstack, because the organization is centred around volunteers, and it was important to empower them to easily make changes to the marketing front end of their organization. The WordPress theme has a beautiful interface for managing content. However, it goes against the philosophy of COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere), recommended by Karen McGrane in her presentations on Content in a Zombie Apocalypse.

      Symphony

      My interest in the subject of Adaptive Content goes back to the days when Symphony was my tool of choice.

  14. Sep 2021
    1. the actionable content should be human-centered, i.e., should carry an emotional connection.

      CTA objectivity

    2. Reviews and ratings Product videos Product features and highlights Clear, high-resolution images

      B2B website assets

    3. B2B eCommerce websites need to focus on: Buying guides Product videos, explainer videos Articles and blog posts 24/7 customer support Case Studies

      B2B content ideas

    1. In one SEMrush study, articles with at least 3,000 words generated 3X more traffic, 4X more shares, and 3.5X more backlinks than short-form articles.

      SEO hack

      find new topics to write

    2. than outbound marketing

      check outbound vs inbound marketing

    1. aware of your competitors and establish ways to differentiate your company from them,

      figure competitors

    2. Content marketing is a strategic inbound marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and educational content digitally to attract, retain, and qualify potential new leads.  

      content marketing def

    3. If your company is able to rank on search engines, such as Google, for targeted keywords and phrases, you can drive awareness of your brand.

      SEO

    4. LinkedIn Facebook, Instagram, Twitter

      B2B VS B2C

      platform specific strategy needed

    1. brand’s story.

      content strategy objective

    2. Learn about their buying behaviors and notice how much time it takes for the person to turn into a customer. Notice the open rates and click rates of emails to learn what kind of products they are interested in and customize future emails accordingly.

      email marketing tips

    3. There’s a lot you can post on social media – experiment with BTS videos, memes, tips and tricks, clothing inspo, etc.

      SM tips

  15. Aug 2021
    1. If we cannot afford real, diverse, and independent assessment, we will not realize the promise of middleware.
    2. Building on platforms' stores of user-generated content, competing middleware services could offer feeds curated according to alternate ranking, labeling, or content-moderation rules.

      Already I can see too many companies relying on artificial intelligence to sort and filter this material and it has the ability to cause even worse nth degree level problems.

      Allowing the end user to easily control the content curation and filtering will be absolutely necessary, and even then, customer desire to do this will likely loose out to the automaticity of AI. Customer laziness will likely win the day on this, so the design around it must be robust.