328 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I think one thing would have been a solution to basically everything here: Player created maps. As Im involved in many modding communities, I know for a fact that player created content can be vital in making games last so much longer, and the quality can shoot for the stars, Player created maps would have been fantastic for this game.
    1. So, what can we do to check for None in our programs? You can use builtin Optional type and write a lot of if some is not None: conditions. But, having null checks here and there makes your code unreadable.
  2. www.kickstarter.com www.kickstarter.com
    1. The author will offer presentation/game sessions on Tabletopia, in French and English. In addition, the game will be freely available for players on Tabletopia as soon as the written rules are available.
    1. "Open access" refers to toll-free or gratis access to content

      not necessarily free content

    2. What is the opposite of free content?

      The opposite of free/open-source software is proprietary software or non-free software (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proprietary_software).

      So should we call the opposite of free content "non-free content"? Or "proprietary content"?

      Seems likes either would be fine.

      Looks like https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Non-free_content prefers the term "non-free content".

      Couldn't find anyone contrasting these 2 terms (like I could no doubt find for software):

      Not to be confused with:

      • paid content ... just like:
      • free content should not be confused with gratis content (?)
      • free software should not be confused with freeware
    3. A free cultural work (free content) is, according to the definition of Free Cultural Works, one that has no significant legal restriction on people's freedom to: use the content and benefit from using it, study the content and apply what is learned, make and distribute copies of the content, change and improve the content and distribute these derivative works.
    4. A free cultural work (free content) is, according to the definition of Free Cultural Works, one that has no significant legal restriction on people's freedom to:
    5. A free content, libre content, or free information, is any kind of functional work, work of art, or other creative content that meets the definition of a free cultural work.
    1. The Definition of Free Cultural Works is a definition of free content from 2006. The project evaluates and recommends compatible free content licenses.
  3. Feb 2021
    1. It requires an account to update, but the other inputs are optional. If they're missing, it'll ignore those attributes. If they're present, it'll update them.
    1. The blog A Life Of Productivity uses double opt-ins to make sure that people signing up for the email newsletter really want to read it. If a site visitor was somehow subscribed by accident, the subscription won’t go through unless they click the verification button sent to their email address.<img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-32479" src="https://www.convinceandconvert.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/A-Life-of-Productivity.jpg" alt="A Life of Productivity" width="724" height="549" />
    1. The solution, he said, was to identify “super-spreaders” of slander, the people and the websites that wage the most vicious false attacks.

      This would be a helpful thing in general disinformation from a journalistic perspective too.

    1. Note: auto track sizes (and only auto track sizes) can be stretched by the align-content and justify-content properties.
    1. justify-content Sometimes the total size of your grid might be less than the size of its grid container. This could happen if all of your grid items are sized with non-flexible units like px. In this case you can set the alignment of the grid within the grid container.
    1. I have a Content Security Policy!Oh, do you now.And did somebody tell you that this would prevent malicious code from sending data off to some dastardly domain? I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but the following four lines of code will glide right through even the strictest content security policy.
  4. Jan 2021
    1. Group Rules from the Admins1NO POSTING LINKS INSIDE OF POST - FOR ANY REASONWe've seen way too many groups become a glorified classified ad & members don't like that. We don't want the quality of our group negatively impacted because of endless links everywhere. NO LINKS2NO POST FROM FAN PAGES / ARTICLES / VIDEO LINKSOur mission is to cultivate the highest quality content inside the group. If we allowed videos, fan page shares, & outside websites, our group would turn into spam fest. Original written content only3NO SELF PROMOTION, RECRUITING, OR DM SPAMMINGMembers love our group because it's SAFE. We are very strict on banning members who blatantly self promote their product or services in the group OR secretly private message members to recruit them.4NO POSTING OR UPLOADING VIDEOS OF ANY KINDTo protect the quality of our group & prevent members from being solicited products & services - we don't allow any videos because we can't monitor what's being said word for word. Written post only.

      Wow, that's strict.

    1. The courses span a suite of synthesis methods, including systematic review and systematic mapping, stakeholder engagement in evidence synthesis, and evidence synthesis technology.
    1. Because there is no time left for trial and error and since resources for organising a transformation into a carbon‐neutral world are inherently limited, decision‐making on climate solutions needs to be based on the best available evidence.
    1. Evidence synthesis, which collates, appraises, and summarises results from individual studies across an evidence base and makes them available for policy advice, is particularly well organised in the health sciences; a key role is played here by the global knowledge network Cochrane, founded in 1993 and seated in London. T
    1. This has some interesting research which might be applied to better design for an IndieWeb social space.

      I'd prefer a more positive framing rather than this likely more negative one.

    1. he meant that the designer’s purview is to shape, not to write. But that shaping itself is a profoundly affecting form.
    2. Paul Rand wrote “There is no such thing as bad content, only bad form,”
    3. The apotheosis of this notion, repeated ad nauseum (still!), is Beatrice Warde’s famous Crystal Goblet metaphor, which asserts that design (the glass) should be a transparent vessel for content (the wine).
  5. atomiks.github.io atomiks.github.io
    1. The CSS automatically gets injected into <head> with the CDN (tippy-bundle). With CSP enabled, you may need to separately link dist/tippy.css and use dist/tippy.umd.min.js instead.
    1. Theemergence of the termcontent strategyitselfrepresents widespread recognition that componentcontent management was in great need of aroadmap.

      For me this is one of the key sentences of this paper. It is impossible to understand content strategy without taking component content management into consideration. For an academic approach to content strategy component content management is a key.

    2. In its most commondefinition, a genre is a rhetorical action that istypified and socially recognized based on recurrentsituations; members of organizations use genresfor specific communicative and collaborativepurposes [6], [7]

      This might be translated following the approach of semiotic practices defined by Fontanille et.al.

    1. Small components can set the size of their corner shape using a percentage of the absolute height of the component. This means the corner shape will change as the component height changes.
  6. Dec 2020
  7. Nov 2020
    1. With the advent of JavaScript modules (import and export), it's possible to build libraries that are tree-shakeable. This means that a user of your library can import just the bits they need, without burdening their users with all the code you're not using.
    1. rickrolling

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ

      While Rick Astley's "Never Gonna Give You Up," has existed since the 1980s, it was user-generated-content spawned from 4chan that linked the song to the bait-and-switch practice of surprising unsuspecting internet users with it after being promised something else (Dewey, 2014).

      Works Cited:

      Official Rick Astley. (2009). Rick Astley - Never Gonna Give You Up (Video) [Video]. YouTube.

      Dewey, C. (2014). Absolutely everything you need to know to understand 4chan, the Internet’s own bogeyman. Retrieved 5 November 2020, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2014/09/25/absolutely-everything-you-need-to-know-to-understand-4chan-the-internets-own-bogeyman/

    2. where some of the internet’s worst scandals have been fomented

      While 4chan has developed a mostly negative public perception for itself, with the Washington Post's Caitlin Dewey even calling it "the Internet's own bogeyman," it also has brought attention to User-Generated-Content as beloved as Rickrolling and Chocolate Rain (Dewey, 2014). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwTZ2xpQwpA

      Works Cited:

      Dewey, C. (2014). Absolutely everything you need to know to understand 4chan, the Internet’s own bogeyman. Retrieved 5 November 2020, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2014/09/25/absolutely-everything-you-need-to-know-to-understand-4chan-the-internets-own-bogeyman/

      TayZonday. (2007). "Chocolate Rain" Original Song by Tay Zonday [Video]. YouTube.

    1. If your Svelte components contain <style> tags, by default the compiler will add JavaScript that injects those styles into the page when the component is rendered. That's not ideal, because it adds weight to your JavaScript, prevents styles from being fetched in parallel with your code, and can even cause CSP violations. A better option is to extract the CSS into a separate file. Using the emitCss option as shown below would cause a virtual CSS file to be emitted for each Svelte component. The resulting file is then imported by the component, thus following the standard Webpack compilation flow.
    1. the correction is appreciated, but please keep the reasoning behind the edit in the metadata text, or as a hidden comment in the source (using <!-- comment here --> syntax); putting it in huge bold print in the post itself can be considered defacement, and is probably why the initial suggestion was rejected.
  8. Oct 2020
    1. Pre-service Teachers' Practices towards Digital Game Design for Technology Integration into Science Classrooms

      This article looks at yet another new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the adult learning field. It examines the results of teaching educators about digital game design for technology integration. It looked at integrating this technology into science classrooms in particular. 9/10, very interesting new technology with lots of potential implications in the adult learning field.

    1. Integrating academic and everyday learning through technology: Issues and challenges for researchers, policy makers and practitioners

      This article examines the potential to connect academic with knowledge learned through life and career experience using technology and other traditional methods. Challenges and best practices are presented and all levels of individual and institution are included in the discussion. Rating 8/10. Very interesting idea and cool how many levels of organization are included.

    1. Preservice Teacher Experience with Technology Integration: How the Preservice Teacher’s Effica-cy in Technology Integration is Impactedby the Context of the Preservice Teacher Education Pro-gram

      This article discusses the need for teacher education to focus just as much on technology knowledge (regardless of grade level taught) as on educational theory and methods. It argues that teachers cannot be effective if they are not trained in not only current technologies, but also taught to be familiar with navigating new technologies as the emerge. 5/10 Very specific to K-12 teacher education.

    1. Summary of Margot Bloomstein's talk "Designing for Trust in an uncertain world." (Recording of a similar talk on Vimeo)

    2. Mass media and our most cynical memes say we live in a post-fact era. So who can we trust — and how do our users invest their trust?

      Margot's starting point is what has been called the epistemic crisis.

    1. I just wrote a long, considered, friendly, and I hope helpful comment here but -- sorry, I have to see the irony in this once again -- your system wouldn't let me say anything longer tahn 1,500 characters. If you want more intelligent conversations, you might want to expand past soundbite.

      In 2008, even before Twitter had become a thing at 180 characters, here's a great reason that people should be posting their commentary on their own blogs.

      This example from 2008 is particularly rich as you'll find examples on this page of Derek Powazek and Jeff Jarvis posting comments with links to much richer content and commentary on their own websites.

      We're a decade+ on and we still haven't managed to improve on this problem. In fact, we may have actually made it worse.

      I'd love to see On the Media revisit this idea. (Of course their site doesn't have comments at all anymore either.)

    1. (Roose, who has since deleted his tweet as part of a routine purge of tweets older than 30 days, told me it was intended simply as an observation, not a full analysis of the trends.)

      Another example of someone regularly deleting their tweets at regular intervals. I've seem a few examples of this in academia.

    1. Maybe of interest for some readers here: With your plugin, it's also straightforward to import the "tweets.csv" file from the official Twitter archive, which contains all the tweets (and a lot of metadata) from one's personal account. Still don't know what to do with this in TiddlyWiki, but there is certainly potential...
    1. First, Manton's business model is for users to not own their content. You might be able to own your domain name, but if you have a hosted Micro.blog blog, the content itself is hosted on Micro.blog servers, not yours. You can export your data, or use an RSS feed to auto-post it to somewhere you control directly, but if you're not hosting the content yourself, how does having a custom domain equal self-hosting your content and truly owning it? Compared to hosting your own blog and auto-posting it to Micro.blog, which won't cost you and won't make Micro.blog any revenue, posting for a hosted blog seems to decrease your ownership.

      I'm not sure that this is the problem that micro.blog is trying to solve. It's trying to solve the problem of how to be online as simply and easily as possible without maintaining the overhead of hosting and managing your own website.

      As long as one can easily export their data at will and redirect their domain to another host, one should be fine. In some sense micro.blog makes it easier than changing phone carriers, which in most cases will abandon one's text messages without jumping through lots of hoops. .

      One step that micro.blog could set up is providing a download dump of all content every six months to a year so that people have it backed up in an accessible fashion. Presently, to my knowledge, one could request this at any time and move when they wished.

    2. Manton says owning your domain so you can move your content without breaking URLs is owning your content, whereas I believe if your content still lives on someone else's server, and requires them to run the server and run their code so you can access your content, it's not really yours at all, as they could remove your access at any time.

      This is a slippery slope problem, but people are certainly capable of taking positions along a broad spectrum here.

      The one thing I might worry about--particularly given micro.blog's--size is the relative bus factor of one represented by Manton himself. If something were to happen to him, what recourse has he built into make sure that people could export their data easily and leave the service if the worst were to come to happen? Is that documented somewhere?

      Aside from this the service has one of the most reasonable turn-key solutions for domain and data ownership I've seen out there without running all of your own infrastructure.

    1. We created a strategy that focused on providing some of that in-store expertise as content online. We called it non-product content because it was aimed not at selling you something, but at helping you achieve a task

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    1. If you look long enough you can find my early terrible writing. You can find blog posts in which I am an idiot. I’ve had a lot of uninformed and passionate opinions on geopolitical issues from Ireland to Israel. You can find tweets I thought were witty, but think are stupid now. You can find opinions I still hold that you disagree with. I’m going to leave most of that stuff up. In doing so, I’m telling you that you have to look for context if you are seeking to understand me. You don’t have to try, I’m not particularly important, but I am complicated. When I die, I’m going to instruct my executors to burn nothing. Leave the crap there, because it’s part of my journey, and that journey has a value. People who came from where I did, and who were given the thoughts I was given, should know that the future can be different from the past.
    1. But, whereas engaged scholarship has a political imperative, academic microcelebrity has a market imperative. Academic microcelebrity is ostentatiously apolitical, albeit falsely so because markets are always political. Academic microcelebrity encourages brand building as opposed to consciousness-raising; brand awareness as opposed to co-creation of knowledge. It creates perverse incentives for impact as opposed to valuing social change. Microcelebrity is the economics of attention in which academics are being encouraged, mostly through normative pressure, to brand their academic knowledge for mass consumption. However, the risks and rewards of presenting oneself “to others over the Web using tools typically associated with celebrity promotion” (Barone 2009) are not the same for all academics in the neo-liberal “public” square of private media.

      I'm reminded here of the huge number of academics who write/wrote for The Huffington Post for their "reach" despite the fact that they were generally writing for free. Non-academics were doing the same thing, but for the branding that doing so gave them.

      In my opinion, both of these groups were cheated in that they were really building THP's brand over their own.

    1. Furthermore, many designers have limited experi-ence working on projects that defy the boundaries of a typical cor-porate design brief.

      Was könnte das für eine Content strategy 4 degrowth bedeuten?

      1. Sie findet in einer heterogenen/hybriden Umgebung statt.
      2. Sie bezieht immer auch nichtmenschliche Stakeholder ein.
      3. Sie hängt von einer genauen Analyse der Situation ab, die diese nicht nur abbildet, sondern verändert.
      4. Sie ist auf Kollaboration angelegt.
  9. Sep 2020
    1. What were the “right things” to serve the community, as Zuckerberg put it, when the community had grown to more than 3 billion people?

      This is just one of the contradictions of having a global medium/platform of communication being controlled by a single operator.

      It is extremely difficult to create global policies to moderate the conversations of 3 billion people across different languages and cultures. No team, no document, is qualified for such a task, because so much is dependent on context.

      The approach to moderation taken by federated social media like Mastodon makes a lot more sense. Communities moderate themselves, based on their own codes of conduct. In smaller servers, a strict code of conduct may not even be necessary - moderation decisions can be based on a combination of consensus and common sense (just like in real life social groups and social interactions). And there is no question of censorship, since their moderation actions don't apply to the whole network.

    1. A Zwicky Box allows you to search the solution space for the best answer, by allowing you to break up the solution into its component parts and endlessly recombine them to find new solutions you haven’t thought of. It’s like a LEGO set for problem solving.

      Een interessante manier om nieuwe ideeën te ontdekken in een gebied wat je al kent. Handig voor bv innovatie trajecten, content ontwikkeling, brainstorm

    1. I edited the post twice to remove the broken link /react-js-the-king-of-universal-apps/ (with the edit-comments clearly mentioning that it is a broken link), but the peers have rejected the edit both the times. Can someone guide me what's wrong in editing an answer and removing a broken link?
    1. the

      Maybe similar to architects supervising the construction of a building

    2. Content designers have a strong slant to researching the UX of the content, then creating the content with that in mind. Content strategists develop systems, and the components

      To me this practice seems still broken. Content modelling, defining voice and tone etc. are strategic tasks depending on user research.

    3. Bush clearly understood the potential in managing content for a range of uses; unfortunately, the technology did not yet exist for his conceptual browsing machine. But it did sow the seeds for thinking about content in ways that we find familiar today.

      The reference to Bush shows, that content strategy and the history of hypertext are closely related.

  10. Aug 2020
    1. Browsing Twitter the other day, I once again found myself sucked into a far-off event that truly does not matter, and it occurred to me that social media is an orthographic camera.

      How does this relate to Nicholas Carr's article and ideas about category errors in From context collapse to content collapse?

    1. A fascinating viewpoint on social media, journalism, and information. There are some great implied questions for web designers hiding in here.

    2. Content collapse, as I define it, is the tendency of social media to blur traditional distinctions among once distinct types of information — distinctions of form, register, sense, and importance. As social media becomes the main conduit for information of all sorts — personal correspondence, news and opinion, entertainment, art, instruction, and on and on — it homogenizes that information as well as our responses to it.
    1. review teacher notes and the schedule theydesigned for themselves for the week,

      Students are dictating the pace and the content they're working on. The teacher is helping to curate and interpret those materials as students work through the idea.

    1. This is interesting for many reasons, and it is especially interesting for content strategists. It shows how closely different semiotic practices/forms of content are interrelated, e.g. emails and official statements. It also shows how difficult it is to distinguish between content strategy and propaganda. Via Jeff Jarvis auf Twitter

  11. Jul 2020
    1. The Wall Street Journal’s newsroom is not involved in sponsored content but its commercial team tells advertisers it can “deploy sophisticated storytelling techniques in order to help brands create content-driven connections with audiences”. For some reporters and editors, this is tantamount to media being complicit in its own displacement.
  12. Jun 2020
    1. Just as journalists should be able to write about anything they want, comedians should be able to do the same and tell jokes about anything they please

      where's the line though? every output generates a feedback loop with the hivemind, turning into input to ourselves with our cracking, overwhelmed, filters

      it's unrealistic to wish everyone to see jokes are jokes, to rely on journalists to generate unbiased facts, and politicians as self serving leeches, err that's my bias speaking

    1. MethodsSearching Strategy, Inclusion Criteria, and Study SelectionElectronic searches for this systematic review were conducted in July 2015 using PsycINFO, PubMed, MEDLINE, EBSCO, SSCI, Communication Studies: a SAGE Full-Text Collection, Communication & Mass Media Complete, Association for Computing Machinery Digital Library, and IEEE Xplore. These databases were used because they include research on subjects such as health, aging, social science, digital technologies, computer-mediated communication, and communication science. A unified search term using Boolean operators was applied for all databases: ((social isolation OR loneliness) AND elderly AND (Internet OR social media OR information and communication technology)). Next, to ensure a broad inclusion of published studies relevant to our review topic, we adopted the following criteria to select studies for the review: (1) publications must be in English; (2) studies must empirically investigate the effects of ICTs on one or more attributes of social isolation among the elderly; and (3) study participants must be aged 55 years or older.

      Most scholarly articles include a methodology section.

    1. (TORONTO) — The NHL is hoping to move to Phase 2 of its return-to-play protocol, including the opening of practice facilities and allowing small group workouts, early next month.

      The content is focused on general interest—sports.

    1. The EARN IT act turns Section 230 protection into a hypocritical bargaining chip. At a high level, what the bill proposes is a system where companies have to earn Section 230 protection by following a set of designed-by-committee “best practices” that are extraordinarily unlikely to allow end-to-end encryption. Anyone who doesn’t comply with these recommendations will lose their Section 230 protection.
    2. Broadly speaking, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act protects online platforms in the United States from legal liability for the behavior of their users. In the absence of this protection, many of the apps and services that are critical to the way the internet functions today may have never been created in the first place – or they couldn’t have been created in America.
    1. A year’s worth of cajoling back and forth has ultimately resulted in the EARN-IT bill wending its way through the U.S. system, a bill that, if passed, would see messaging services become legally responsible for the content on their platforms. While not mandating backdoors, per se, without some form of probes into message content, the argument runs that the punitive risks become unsurvivable.
    2. there’s a bill tiptoeing through the U.S. Congress that could inflict the backdoor virus that law enforcement agencies have been trying to inflict on encryption for years... The choice for tech companies comes down to weakening their own encryption and endangering the privacy and security of all their users, or foregoing protections and potentially facing liability in a wave of lawsuits.
    1. Once the platforms introduce backdoors, those arguing against such a move say, bad guys will inevitably steal the keys. Lawmakers have been clever. No mention of backdoors at all in the proposed legislation or the need to break encryption. If you transmit illegal or dangerous content, they argue, you will be held responsible. You decide how to do that. Clearly there are no options to some form of backdoor.
    1. Despite its opposition, EARN-IT is the clearest threat yet to end-to-end encryption, given this clever twist in pushing the onus onto the platforms to avoid transmitting illegal content, rather than mandating a lawful interception approach.
    2. Tiring of the privacy and safety debate, those behind EARN-IT have proposed making the platforms responsible for the content they transmit, encrypted or not. This would mean, as explained by Sophos, that tech companies “either weaken their own encryption and endanger the privacy and security of all their users, or forego protections and potentially face liability in a wave of lawsuits.”
    1. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) has notable safe-harbor provisions which protect Internet service providers from the consequences of their users' actions. (Similarly, the EU directive on electronic commerce provides a similar provision of "mere conduit" which, while not exactly the same, serves much the same function as the DMCA safe harbor in this instance.)