5 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2020
    1. One thing that using this tool has highlighted for me is that there are a lot of things happening in our community every day, between news, announcements, events and other stuff. If you only rely on what your social media service of choice has decided is worth knowing because it’s generating clicks or discussion, you’re likely to miss something important. Also, do you really want to get your news crammed in between cat videos and political rants from distant acquaintances?
  2. Apr 2018
    1. Information we receive without consciously asking a question

      Information diet & filter bubbles are related concepts. I wonder if there is such a thing as "Information Affective Disorder"?

  3. Dec 2016
    1. We need to have our crap detectors on high alert, and double-check everything we can, especially if you find it popping back into your mind later.

      To be critical, we have to read, think, and process over time. I'm definitely guilty of casual scrolling, but I'm also much more careful about the quick retweet.

    2. That means they make it easy to get the “gist” of a “news” story without going to the actual article, and they attract attention away from the name of the source in their news story previews.

      This is huge. Pew's report this year said that 57% of American adults still watch TV for news (which includes cable), but in the 18-50 year old bracket, 50% are online. There is a significant shift toward news skimming over news reading.

    3. Be wary of casual scrolling. This is hard work

      That's an understatement. I wonder if information diet is an issue here - i.e. avoid the sites that serve us crap.