305 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. While Trailblazer offers you abstraction layers for all aspects of Ruby On Rails, it does not missionize you. Wherever you want, you may fall back to the "Rails Way" with fat models, monolithic controllers, global helpers, etc. This is not a bad thing, but allows you to step-wise introduce Trailblazer's encapsulation in your app without having to rewrite it.
  2. Feb 2021
    1. Universal Links allow you to register a series of domains that are allowed to interact with an installed application. If the application is not installed, the universal link is opened with Safari, allowing you to inform the user of the existence of an application or whatever is necessary.
    1. Implicit intents do not name a specific component, but instead declare a general action to perform, which allows a component from another app to handle it. For example, if you want to show the user a location on a map, you can use an implicit intent to request that another capable app show a specified location on a map.
    1. Yes, you do face difficult choices (moral) but you don't care about it. All you care are the reputation bars. So... Let's kill this guy, who cares if he is innocent, but this faction needs it or I'm dead. Sounds great on paper but to be honest... you just sit there and do whatever for these reputation bars. If you won't, then you lose
    1. Say, for instance, a hypothetical self-driving car is sold as being the safest on the market. One of the factors that makes it safer is that it “knows” when a big truck pulls up along its left side and automatically moves itself three inches to the right while still remaining in its own lane. But what if a cyclist or motorcycle happens to be pulling up on the right at the same time and is thus killed because of this safety feature?

      I think that an algorithm that's "smart" enough to move away from a truck is also "smart" enough to know that it cannot physically occupy the same space as the motorcycle.

    1. Part of me thinks that open source can be more rewarding to the creators/contributors. But maybe the real contribution is the permanent addition to the tools available to humanity, and if you have the wits, you can make a decent business out of it without tainting open source.
    2. For a sufficiently successful and industry-relevant open source project, it's possible for the main developers to earn a living e.g. by selling related consulting services.
  3. Jan 2021
    1. We informed and documented. We made it easy for you to understand the problem and also to take action if you disagreed. I hope you didn’t read https://linuxmint-user-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/snap.html#how-to-install-the-snap-store-in-linux-mint-20. I can’t understand how it could be simpler.
    2. Is it harder to enable it in Mint than it is to disable it in Ubuntu? Not at all. Is how to enable it better documented in Mint than how to disable it in Ubuntu? Absolutely: https://linuxmint-user-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/snap.html.
  4. Dec 2020
    1. No more waiting around for pull requests to be merged and published. No more forking repos just to fix that one tiny thing preventing your app from working.

      This could be both good and bad.

      potential downside: If people only fix things locally, then they may be less inclined/likely to actually/also submit a merge request, and therefore it may be less likely that this actually (ever) gets fixed upstream. Which is kind of ironic, considering the stated goal "No more waiting around for pull requests to be merged and published." But if this obviates the need to create a pull request (does it), then this could backfire / work against that goal.

      Requiring someone to fork a repo and push up a fix commit -- although a little extra work compared to just fixing locally -- is actually a good thing overall, for the community/ecosystem.

      Ah, good, I see they touched on some of these points in the sections:

      • Benefits of patching over forking
      • When to fork instead
  5. Nov 2020
    1. Unfortunately it is not just the semantic that is broken. There are lot of things.For example if you look at some of the examples (https://flutter.github.io/samples/#/) - you can see that indeed there are some div and p tags but it is not entirely normal DOM elements. For example you can't even select text anywhere on the screen. And there are more and more little things like that.Just to be clear - Flutter for web is great, I'm happy it exists, but it is not comparable to React/Vue or Svelte.IMO Flutter for web is good to post live examples of Flutter code or maybe some last-minute-boss-request to make a web version of existing app, but for not for full-blown web app. :)
    1. One last bonus: CSS variables can be written in a way that makes it easier for human programmers to understand. If you just see hex code #93e9be, you won’t know what color it produces, while --brand-green makes clear the purpose of the variable.
    1. An additional benefit is semantic identifiers. For example, --main-text-color is easier to understand than #00ff00, especially if this same color is also used in other contexts.
    1. I was originally interested in figuring out how you could figure out what’s actually true online.

      Conor was trying to figure out how to find out what's true online with Roam.

    1. When you email me, please include a minimal bash script that demonstrates the problem in the body of the email (not as an attachment). Also very clearly state what the desired output or effect should be, and what error or failure you are getting instead. You are much more likely to get a response if your script isn't some giant monster with obtuse identifiers that I would have to spend all afternoon parsing.
  6. Oct 2020
    1. Furthermore, JSX encourages bad non-dry code. Having seen a lot of JSX over the past few months, its encourages copypasta coding.
    2. hyperscript is much simpler to refactor and DRY up your code than with JSX, because, being vanilla javascript, its easier to work with variable assignment, loops and conditionals.
    1. when we are given the space to consider our decisions, we tend to make fewer errors.

      think about examples where this isn't the case like high-pressure car buying

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  7. Sep 2020
    1. When a component reaches such a size that this becomes a problem, the obvious course of action is to refactor it into multiple components. But the refactoring is complex for the same reason: extracting the styles that relate to a particular piece of markup is an error-prone manual process, where the relevant styles may be interleaved with irrelevant ones.
    1. Decision fatigue describes a phenomenon where giving any real thought to a decision takes up energy.

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    1. Baker, C. M., Campbell, P. T., Chades, I., Dean, A. J., Hester, S. M., Holden, M. H., McCaw, J. M., McVernon, J., Moss, R., Shearer, F. M., & Possingham, H. P. (2020). From climate change to pandemics: Decision science can help scientists have impact. ArXiv:2007.13261 [Physics]. http://arxiv.org/abs/2007.13261