10 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
  2. Apr 2020
    1. While Web site is still doing well in the U.S., it is all but dead in the U.K. Current Google News searches limited to U.K. publications find only about one instance of Web site (or web site) for every thousand instances of website. The ratio is similar in Australian and New Zealand publications. In Canada, the ratio is somewhere in the middle—about 20 to one in favor of the one-word form.
    2. Exceptions are easily found, however, especially in American sources, where Web site (or web site, without the capital w) appears about once for every six instances of website. This is likely due to the influence of the New York Times, which is notoriously conservative with tech terms. The Times still uses Web site, and many American publications follow suit. Yet even those that often use Web site in their more closely edited sections tend to allow website in their blogs and other web-only sections.
    1. Other languages, German for example, are notorious for very long compunds like this and this, that are made up and written as one word directly. Perhaps the way your native language deals with compounds explains your (or other authors') personal preference and sense of "right"?
  3. Feb 2020
  4. Jan 2020
  5. Dec 2019
    1. There are thousands of to-do list apps out there, in part because no system works perfectly for everyone. I’m not going to say todo.txt is the exception, and that it will work for everyone, because that would be crazy. But todo.txt is the most flexible tool I’ve come across. In part, this is because of the sheer number of clients available, but also because the simplicity lends itself to improvisation.

      First time I've seen improvisation used like this.

  6. Nov 2019
  7. Dec 2015
    1. Social service workers repeatedly reminded residents that it did not ‘make sense’to be cold when thermostats stood at recommended settings (69–72F [20.5–22.2C])

      That's so interesting. The residents had become entirely habituated and adapted to a much hotter temperature that they actually felt cold at a standard indoor room temperature.. Sounds like people from Southern California (kidding.. or am I?)