120 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2024
    1. we can then shift to a better way of doing it and we knew what that was before genome sequencing

      for - quote - better approach than gene sequence as universal panecea

      quote - better approach than gene sequence as universal panecea - (see quote below)

      • Look at the high-level organization of the system
        • the living system
      • Locate what is going wrong there and then work down to find what you might do
      • at lower levels with a drug or any other kind of treatment for that matter to put it right
      • That works much better than trying to go the other way because
        • going the other way, the space for
          • possible molecules and
          • possible effects and
          • even more possible combinations of effects
        • because those complex diseases are going to require combinations of treatment
        • There are too many
        • You can't do clinical trials on all of those possibilities
        • It's just far too expensive
        • So I think we just take need to take a different approach to medical research
          • to try to benefit from the human genome sequencing
          • in a way that's different from what they originally promised
  2. Apr 2024
    1. for - rapid whole system change - Speed & Scale

      summary - hmmm....what's mssing? - They don't explicitly promote citizen led action - They are still using the net zero by 2050 story, - which in many critics eyes is actually far too little and too late - See Kevin Anderson's critique of net zero - https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?max=100&expanded=true&user=stopresetgo&exactTagSearch=true&any=net%2Bzero - They don't address inequality, decolonialization or climate justice issues - They don't identify meta or polycrisis

      from - https://hyp.is/J7oIeAEpEe-J1kuOInb20A/www.linkedin.com/posts/colinleduc_we-are-launching-our-speed-scale-2024-global-activity-7188309472837021696-SxSf/

  3. Mar 2024
    1. Speth apparently agrees with other writers such as Naomi Klein or Herman Daly. Daly, for example, has written a series of notable books and articles arguing for a “Steady State Economy.” He argues that the growth-driven industrial economy we live under is incompatible with an ecologically sustainable society. Daly advocates an economy which develops qualitatively, as he puts it, but not quantitatively (with appropriate and balanced development of the poorer nations). “The remaining natural world no longer is able to provide the sources and sinks for the metabolic throughput necessary to sustain the existing oversized economy—much less a growing one….The economy must conform to the rules of a steady state—seek qualitative development, but stop aggregate quantitative growth.” (Daly 2008; 1) Better not bigger. He believes that such an economy would produce as much happiness among the people as our existing system—if not more. “…The correlation between absolute income and happiness extends only up to some threshold of ‘sufficiency’….” (10)

      Better not bigger

  4. Jan 2024
    1. Introducing relationships between issues will considerably increase the complexity of GitLab. That is not a reason not to do it. But it is a reason for us to be strategic in when we do it, and ensure we have a good design that is scalable and aligns with our other initiatives.
  5. Nov 2023
    1. this is a cancer uh approach that we work on which is to not to kill those cells but to force them to re reconnect to their neighbors and when they reconnect to the 00:31:24 neighbors they once again become part of the collective that's working on making nice skin nice muscle they stop being metastatic and they they go back
      • for: quote - Michael Levin, quote - MET of individuality, quote - memory wipe, quote - cancer therapy - MET of individuality

      • quote: Michael Levin

        • this is a cancer approach that we work on which is to not to kill those cells but to force them to re reconnect to their neighbors and when they reconnect to the neighbors they once again become part of the collective that's working on making nice skin nice muscle they stop being metastatic and they they go back
      • comment

        • Michael refers to cancer as a "memory wipe" where they have forgotten the normative programmed narrative of bodily / collective / multicellular unity
  6. Sep 2023
    1. The dualism of scientific materialism and its one-person psychologies are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
      • for: dualism, dualism - psychology, unintended consequences, unintended consequences - dualism in psychology, progress trap, progress trap - dualism in psychology

      • paraphrase

        • The dualism of scientific materialism gives rise to one-person psychologies
          • and are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
        • For instance, a good deal of the historical denial of the role of psychological and social trauma has been traced
          • back to the Freudian model’s almost exclusive focus on the internal world;
            • the actual impact of others and society has been, as a result, relatively ignored.
        • Modern psychiatry, which accepts the same philosophical model but changes the level of explanation, is just as culpable.
        • Likewise CBT, with its focus on dysfunctional thought patterns and rational remedies administered from the outside, also follows the same misguided philosophy.
      • question

        • what are concrete ways this has caused harm?
      • future work
        • perform literature review on case studies where Winnicott's approach has been a more constructive therapeutic one
  7. Aug 2023
    1. these are the seven main thrusts of the series
      • for: societal design, designing societies, societal architecture, transforming society, whole system change, SSO, social superorganism, John Boik

      The seven main ideas for societal design: 1. societal transformation - is necessary to avoid catastrophe 2. the specific type of transformation is science-based transformation based on entirely new systems - de novo design - 3. A practical way to implement the transformation in the real world - it must be economical, and doable within the short time window for system change before us. - Considering a time period of 50 years for total change, with some types of change at a much higher priority than others. - The change would be exponential so starting out slower, and accelerating - Those communities that are the first to participate would make the most rapid improvements. 4. Promoting a worldview of society as a social superorganism, a cognitive organism, and its societal systems as a cognitive architecture. 5. Knowing the intrinsic purpose of a society - each subsystem must be explained in terms of the overall intrinsic purpose. 6. The reason for transformation - Transformation that improves cognition reduces the uncertainty that our society's intrinsic purpose is fulfilled. 7. Forming a partnership between the global science community and all the local communities of the world.

    2. all that sense making and problem 00:14:18 solving has been siloed
      • for: whole system approach, system approach, systems thinking, systems thinking - societal design, societal design, John Boik, societal design - evolutionary approach, designing societies - evolutionary approach -paraphrase
        • currently, all societal systems function as silos
        • how does the total system change and achieve new stable states?
        • advocating for designing societal systems so that the cognitive architectures of the different component systems can all serve the same purpose
        • design a fitness evaluation score Rather than tackling problems in individual silos, John is promoting an integrated approach.

      This is wholly consistent with the underpinnings of SRG Deep Humanity praxis that stresses the same need for multi-disciplinary study and synthesis of all the various parts of the SSO.into one unified Gestalt to mitigate progress traps. https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fthetyee.ca%2FAnalysis%2F2019%2F09%2F20%2FRonald-Wright-Can-We-Dodge-Progress-Trap%2F&group=world https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fthetyee.ca%2FCulture%2F2018%2F10%2F12%2FHumanity-Progress-Trap%2F&group=world

  8. Jul 2023
    1. When you run out of ideas and desperate, try thinking “opposite” like Fosbury.

      Worth adding to the list of oblique strategies...

      related to methods of proof: direct proofs by day, contradiction by night

      Changing methods of approach to problems

      via khimtan at https://www.instagram.com/p/CpkJHCfJnyW/

  9. May 2023
    1. Power allows people to act freely, power leading to approach motivation

      "Most contemporary psychological scientists define approach motivation as the impulse to go toward positive stimuli, where stimuli are external goal objects (Lang & Bradley, 2008)."

  10. Jan 2023
  11. Nov 2022
  12. Oct 2022
    1. The information ecosystem is broken. Our political conversations are happening on infrastructure—Facebook, YouTube, Twitter—built for viral advertising. The velocity of social sharing, the power of recommendation algorithms, the scale of social networks, and the accessibility of media manipulation technology has created an environment where pseudo events, half-truths, and outright fabrications thrive. Edward Murrow has been usurped by Alex Jones.

      I believe the variable of lies and misinformation thriving in virality is based on the idea that negativity is more engaging and intriguing than positivity. When something stimulates a negative feeling such as fear or anxiety, people engage because they feel insecure whether it be relative to the condition of their environment or internal self-perception. For example, if you read something negative about the President, you care because you live in the United States and relate it to your own well-being. Further, if someone read negative articles about a person they envy, they may feel inclined to engage & share it because that person's success made them feel inferior. Unfortunately, negativity sells.

  13. Sep 2022
    1. PRs will introduce various mechanisms step by step. Some of these have issues already. A possible breakdown could be: Annotation collection using instance values (links also does this) Defining annotations to which multiple keywords contribute (this is new, see Need more details of annotation collection #530) Defining subschema and keyword processing results to include annotations Processing sequence for keywords that dynamically rely on the results of static keywords The actual definition of unevaluatedProperties An example of unevaluatedProperties
  14. Aug 2022
    1. When faced with an aversive situation, individuals differ in how they seek to reduce feelings of stress through coping. Some forms of coping are adaptive and lead to resilience in the face of stress while other forms of coping are maladaptive and may result in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or anxiety disorders (Dymond, 2019; Zoellner et al., 2020). Early work defined coping as involving approach or avoidance coping strategies (Folkman & Lazarus, 1980; Moos & Schaefer, 1984). Approach coping is defined as actively moving towards a stressor in order to seek information, social support, plan ahead, and attempt to solve the problems (Finset et al., 2002). Approach coping can also involve vigilance (Krohne, 1993) in that person deals with stress by increased attention and processing of aversive information. Unlike approach coping, avoidance coping is multidimensional. Avoidance coping has been defined as a passive coping strategy in which an individual disengages from a stressor or as an active coping strategy in which an individual turns away from or seeks to escape from a stressor (Folkman & Lazarus, 1988). Feifel & Strack (1989) also differentiated two similar two aspects of avoidance, avoidance and resignation. In addition, avoidance coping involves cognitive/emotional strategies to reduce thoughts or feelings such as mental disengagement or denial, or behavioral attempts to physically remove one’s self from an aversive situation.
  15. Jul 2022
  16. bafybeiapea6l2v2aio6hvjs6vywy6nuhiicvmljt43jtjvu3me2v3ghgmi.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeiapea6l2v2aio6hvjs6vywy6nuhiicvmljt43jtjvu3me2v3ghgmi.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. Our analysis suggests that it is possible toachieve many of the global biodiversity targetsand sustainability goals related to food, energy,climate, and water at local and global scales.The complexity of the challenges calls for anintegrative (nexus) approach (89) that simulta-neously examines interactions among multiplesectors along with synergies and tradeoffsamong goals. An example of a key nexus arethe simultaneous needs to mitigate climatechange, arrest biodiversity loss, and ensurethat all people have adequate nutrition onone hand, and the potentially negative con-sequences of large-scale land-based climatechange mitigation on the other. Even moder-ate warming will likely be detrimental forbiodiversity (90) and associated benefits topeople (91). However, most scenarios projectedto limit warming to 1.5°C or 2°C by the end ofthe 21st century rely on large-scale mitigationmeasures on land, in the form of bioenergycrops, reforestation, and/or afforestation, neg-atively affecting biodiversity and also foodproduction and water demand (19, 92). At thesame time, expanding the amount of landdevoted to agriculture to ensure that all peoplehave adequate nutrition would negatively af-fect biodiversity as well (93) and would furtherexacerbate climate change (19, 92). Both land-based climate change mitigation and agricul-tural expansion, when deployed at the largescale, can undermine local livelihoods, createaccess problems, and intensify social conflict(94). A suite of possible actions could be ef-fective in navigating these tradeoffs (19, 95)—for example, focusing on regeneration andrestoration of high-carbon ecosystems (aswell as reducing waste and overconsump-tion) rather than massive bioenergy mono-culture plantations—to achieve climate changemitigation (19, 96, 97).

      An integrated nexus approach is recommended, examining interactions between multiple sectors.

      MuSIASEM approach is a good candidate for this: https://magic-nexus.eu/tags/musiasem

  17. Apr 2022
  18. Mar 2022
  19. Feb 2022
    1. Deepti Gurdasani. (2022, January 30). Have tried to now visually illustrate an earlier thread I wrote about why prevalence estimates based on comparisons of “any symptom” between infected cases, and matched controls will yield underestimates for long COVID. I’ve done a toy example below here, to show this 🧵 [Tweet]. @dgurdasani1. https://twitter.com/dgurdasani1/status/1487578265187405828

  20. Dec 2021
  21. Sep 2021
  22. Aug 2021
  23. Jul 2021
  24. Jun 2021
  25. May 2021
    1. That image only contains 200 pixels horizontally, but the browser stretches it to 400px wide or even farther!Luckily, you’ll see there’s an easy “fix” there at the end: our old good friend the width attribute!<img src="example.gif", srcset="example.gif 200w" sizes="(min-width: 400px) 400px, 100vw" width="200" /* <=== TA-DA! */ class="logo">As long as you can specify the width attribute so it reflects the true maximum size of your largest image, you won’t run into this problem of having sizes make your image wider than it naturally should go.
  26. Mar 2021
    1. A proposal to specify the path for bury with classes as values of a hash arg: {}.bury(users: Array, 0 => Hash, name: Hash, something: 'Value') # {user: [{name: {something: 'Value'}]} So all absent nodes could be created via klass.new

      Didn't understand it at first, but now I think it's a pretty clever/decent solution.

      Just a bit more verbose than one might like...

      At first I had reservations about the fact that this requires you to pass a hash ... or rather, once you start using a hash as your "list", you can't just "switch back" to an array (a "problem" I've noticed in RSpec, where you have some tags that are symbols, and some that are hashes: you have to list the symbols first: describe 'thing', :happy_path, driver: :chrome):

      {}.bury(users: Array, 0, 'Value')
      

      But I think that's okay in practice. Just use a hash for all "elements" in your list:

      {}.bury(users: Array, 0 => 'Value')
      
  27. en.wikipedia.org en.wikipedia.org
    1. PyPy uses a technique known as meta-tracing, which transforms an interpreter into a tracing just-in-time compiler.
    1. var md = require('markdown-it')('commonmark');

      first sighting: require(...)(...)

      How would that work with import? Not as fluidly but...

      import markdownIt from 'markdown-it'
      let md = markdownIt('commonmark')
      
  28. Feb 2021
    1. Now let me ask you, do you write JS for a single page application differently from a "traditional" web application? I sure hope you do! In a "traditional" application, you can get away with being sloppy because every time the user navigates to a new page, their browser destroys the DOM and the JavaScript context. SPAs, though, require a more thoughtful approach.
  29. Oct 2020
  30. Sep 2020
    1. Why not just do something like this?
    2. I'm still confused about the need for this, so at the expense of continuing to be that obnoxious kid at the playground, I'm going to stick my neck out again.
    3. Devil's advocate: I'm not convinced the functionalities you list can't already be done within the JS of the component. Example: autofocus can simply be done w/ a method or oncreate.
    4. I'm just pushing on the "is this really a good idea" front
    5. This can and should be done with other components, IMHO.
    6. I'm a lot softer on this feature now - I'm starting to believe that every single use case that you would use a hook for, you could/should use a component for.
    1. “Working backwards”  from customer needs can be contrasted with a “skills-forward” approach where existing skills and competencies are used to drive business opportunities. The skills-forward approach says, “We are really good at X. What else can we do with X?” That’s a useful and rewarding business approach. However, if used exclusively, the company employing it will never be driven to develop fresh skills.

      This reminds me of the Product Management interview task of coming up with a new product. You can start with a SWOT analysis, but then you'd be missing out on thinking from the customer's point of view.

      Bezos calls the former the skills-forward approach, and the latter the working backwards approach.

  31. Aug 2020
    1. Glasgow, A., Glasgow, J., Limonta, D., Solomon, P., Lui, I., Zhang, Y., Nix, M. A., Rettko, N. J., Lim, S. A., Zha, S., Yamin, R., Kao, K., Rosenberg, O. S., Ravetch, J. V., Wiita, A. P., Leung, K. K., Zhou, X. X., Hobman, T. C., Kortemme, T., & Wells, J. A. (2020). Engineered ACE2 receptor traps potently neutralize SARS-CoV-2. BioRxiv, 2020.07.31.231746. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.07.31.231746

  32. Jul 2020
  33. Jun 2020
  34. May 2020
  35. Apr 2020
  36. Feb 2020
    1. Over the two weeks, I realized that listening is a cornerstone of pedagogical justice.

      An approach to education influenced by the Italian Resistance Movement in WWI, the Reggio Emilia Approach, identifies listening as a pedagogy and Carlina Rinaldi articulates it well. Here are some quotes from collaborative work from [Reggio Children and Harvard's Project Zero] x

  37. Jan 2020
    1. I didn’t know where the class was headed

      Another Reggio philosophy is understanding that to practice a Pedagogy of Listening and teaching into the intentions of our students makes us vulnerable and that we have to become more comfortable living with doubt and uncertainty. We participate in a process of Negotiated Learning that is child originated and teacher framed. This is an early childhood approach, and my background (K-4). Possibly adolescents can frame their own learning? Here is more info on Negotiated Learning.

  38. Nov 2019
    1. Basic solution - introduce ActiveRecord::Enum, as simple as possible 5 various steps to improve enums functioning Ultimate solution - wrap all improvements into one implementation
    1. In 2001, AI founder Marvin Minsky asked "So the question is why didn't we get HAL in 2001?"[167] Minsky believed that the answer is that the central problems, like commonsense reasoning, were being neglected, while most researchers pursued things like commercial applications of neural nets or genetic algorithms. John McCarthy, on the other hand, still blamed the qualification problem.[168] For Ray Kurzweil, the issue is computer power and, using Moore's Law, he predicted that machines with human-level intelligence will appear by 2029.[169] Jeff Hawkins argued that neural net research ignores the essential properties of the human cortex, preferring simple models that have been successful at solving simple problems.[170] There were many other explanations and for each there was a corresponding research program underway.
    2. Eventually the earliest successful expert systems, such as XCON, proved too expensive to maintain. They were difficult to update, they could not learn, they were "brittle" (i.e., they could make grotesque mistakes when given unusual inputs), and they fell prey to problems (such as the qualification problem) that had been identified years earlier. Expert systems proved useful, but only in a few special contexts
  39. Jun 2019
  40. Jan 2019
    1. On the contrary, inspecializationswecan only derive a subset of the original products.Refac-toringsimprove the cohesion betweensplelements with-out changing the product family.
    2. a generic framework that follows aModel DrivenEngineeringapproach to capture the evolution of aspl
  41. Nov 2018
    1. In both SLA and CALL (computer-assisted language learning) research, a new perspective may be found in ecological approaches, e.g., van Lier (2004), who takes an ecological world view and applies it to language education. Ecology broadly studies organisms in their relations with their environment. Van Lier’s approach thus incorporates many different perspectives with regard to language learning, e.g., sociocultural theory, semiotics, ecological psychology, and the concepts of self and identity. Key constructs in this approach to language learning are affordances and scaffolding, with an affordance defined as the relationship between an organism and something in the environment that can potentially be useful for that organism. Technology is viewed as a source of affordances and learning opportunities for language learners. Appropriate scaffolding, i.e., help from peers, teachers, or technology itself, might also be necessary, and this is a core feature of telecollaboration.

    2. 2.1.2 Sociocultural theories of SLA In contrast to interactionist research, Block (2003) proposed the “social turn” taken by the field of SLA, and variations of socially based theories and approaches have flourished. For example, socio-cognitive paradigms (Kern & Warschauer, 2000), which view language as social and place emphasis on the role of cultural context and discourse, are often used in the research on telecollaboration. Many studies have been influenced by sociocultural theory (Belz, 2002; Thorne, 2003; Ware, 2005). In the Vygotskian perspective, language is viewed as a mediating tool for learning, and the entire language learning process must by necessity be a dialogic process (see, e.g., Basharina, 2007; Blin, 2012, who rely on Activity Theory and Cultural Historical Activity Theory, respectively, for their analyses of telecollaboration). Other studies make visible the development of linguistic, pragmatic, and intercultural competence in both intra-class telecollaboration (e.g., Abrams, 2008) and inter-class interactions (e.g., Belz & Thorne, 2006; Jin & Erben, 2007). Chun (2011) reports on advanced German learners in the United States engaging online with advanced English learners in Germany, as they used different types of speech acts to indicate their pragmatic ability and to show their developing ICC. Specifically, some learners realized that they could exhibit curiosity and interest (a component of ICC) by engaging in multi-turn statements and did not need to use questions to convey their intent.

    1. The results of the paired-groups experimental study proves "are interpreted as being supportive for the interactionist perspective on SLA, especially the importance of attention". The study focuses on the acquisition of lexical meaning through negotiated interaction on NNS-NNS synchronous CMC. Check into Long's Interaction Hypothesis.

      The benefits of CMA in language learning: interactionist perspective.

    1. "Researchers have found that cognitive interactionist and sociocultural SLA theories offer a means of interpreting prior research on CALL and suggest a point of departure for designing future studies of CALL activities that are based on human–computer interaction and computer-mediated communication."

      Chapelle. C. A 2007. theories expand from interactionist to cognitive interactionist and sociocultural theory cognitive interactionist: Human-computer interaction. sociocultural: CMC (Computer-Mediated Communication)

    1. Sociocultural Approaches to SLA and Technology (Steven Thorne): Sociocultural approaches (SCT) to second language acquisition draw from a tradition of human development emphasizing the culturally organized and goal-directed nature of human behavior and the importance of external social practices in the formation of individual cognition. This paper describes the principle constructs of the theory, including mediation, internalization, and the zone of proximal development, and will describe technology-related research in these areas. Vygotskian SCT shares foundational constructs with distributed and situated cognition, usage-based models of language acquisition, language socialization, and ecological approaches to development, all of which have contributed to new applications of SCT in the areas of language research and pedagogical innovation. A discussion of methodological challenges and current practices will conclude the presentation.

    2. Ecological Approaches to SLA and Technology (Leo van Lier): Ecological approaches to SLA are premised on a holistic view of human-world interrelations and the notion of affordance-effectivity pairings that help to better understand human activity and functioning. To many educators, technology and ecology are irreconcilable opposites. Yet, educationally speaking, they turn out to be perfectly compatible. This presentation examines the ways in which the Internet is an emergent resource, a social tool, and a multimodal repository of texts. The ecological affordances of CALL will be illustrated in terms of activity through, with, at and around computers.

    3. The Interaction Approach and CMC (Bryan Smith): The Interaction Approach(IA) in second language acquisition studies suggests that there is a link between interaction and learning. This approach focuses on three major components of interaction — exposure (input), production (output), and feedback. Many CALL researchers have adopted this theoretical perspective in exploring the relationship between CMC and instructed second language acquisition, exploiting many of the argued affordances offered by this medium in relation to the key tenets of the IA. This paper will provide a conceptual overview of the IA and explore specifically how CALL researchers have sought to study SLA from this theoretical perspective. We will discuss several methodological hurdles facing researchers engaged in this type of research and will offer some suggested strategies for conducting sound SLA/CALL research from an IA.

      the interaction approach overlaps with psycholinguistic approach under the cognitive theory

    1. Learning Design Process

      The Royal Roads University has created this useful site that offers support and assistance in the design and development of curriculum. What I found to be very useful is the support dedicated for Moodle, the online curriculum software as I have recently signed up for the site.

      The methodology used by the University is focused on an outcomes approach with integration of pedagogical and technological elements and blended learning.

      The site has a research link and the kb was excellent. I was very pleased to have found this resource.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  42. Oct 2018
    1. To test this hypothesis we conducted a detailed study on the root architecture of these crops using SimRoot (Postma and Lynch, 2011a, b), a functional–structural plant model, and estimated competition for nitrate, potassium and phosphorus among roots of maize, bean and squash plants grown in monoculture or polyculture.
    1. In this study we examine how the water transport and photosynthetic carbon assimilation rates of leaves are related to the spatial arrangement of veins in the leaf mesophyll.
  43. Aug 2018
    1. in an effort to more firmly ascertain the influence of climate on leaf physiognomy within species, we report results from a large data set that includes two North American woody plants (A. rubrum and Q. kelloggii) whose native ranges span large MAT gradients and are not closely related to each other.