7 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
    1. The disappearance of other species with whom the lives of humans were formerly intertwined increasingly impoverishes our worlds. We lack what Lingis would consider essential emotional teachers. We know our pets. We know zoos; nature films; anthropomorphic fiction, film, and art; toys; cartoons

      With such a lack of animals in our lives, we use our imagination as children when it comes to animals we do not know. Kids love dinosaurs and big cats. I've only seen a snow leopard once, at a zoo, but they are beautiful creatures, and that's why I have a connection to them. Humans take up the world's prime real estate, killing off thousands of species and shoving the world's animals to the sidelines. It's quite depressing, really, the homogenization of the world.

  2. Jun 2020
  3. Apr 2020
  4. community.snowsoftware.com community.snowsoftware.com
    1. a more intuitive modern community that will be better synced with our Knowledge Base and other support materials
  5. Sep 2019
    1. How to Start a Snow Plowing Business in 2019You are here:HomeStartupsHow to Start a Snow…

      Start your own Uber for snow removal Business by launching a snow plow app. A complete guide to digitize your snow removal business.

  6. Jul 2019
    1. 5.3 New version (2017-05-16) NEW - New Office 365 connector for retrieving information from Microsoft Office 365 Cloud Services
  7. Feb 2019
    1. The term “Metaverse” stems from Neal Stephenson’s 1992 novel Snow Crash, and describes a collective virtual shared space that’s created by the convergence of virtually enhanced physical reality and persistent virtual space.

      Cool to see how this is developing, as Snow Crash imagined this before online environments were becoming ore fully fleshed.

  8. May 2017
    1. berm
      In Alaska specifically, the term berm is used to describe various types of long, low ridge structures constructed from dirt, gravel, snow, or forest vegetation. This term can be interchangeable with berm pile, burn pile, berm row, and snow berm. It is believed that the word berm is of Dutch decent. The term first appeared in written English in the eighteenth century regarding the military construction of “a space of ground from 3 to 8 feet wide, sometimes left between the ditch and the base of the parapet.” In more recent times, the term has used to describe “a narrow shelf, edge, or path typically at the bottom or top of a slope or along a bank” (Tabbert, 1985). These berms can be made of gravel, stone, forest vegetation, dirt, or snow (Society for Science & the Public, 1972)
      In “Reactions of Large Groups of Caribou to a Pipeline Corridor on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska,” Walter T. Smith and Raymond D. Cameron discuss the problems Caribou have with navigating around pipelines and their possible causes. They found that caribou were more successful crossing sections of buried pipeline compare to elevated pipeline. Smith and Cameron speculate that this could be a result of the berm dimensions- height and width (Smith & Cameron, 1985). 
      

      References

      Smith, W. T., & Cameron, R. D. (1985). Reactions of Large Groups of Caribou to a Pipeline Corridor on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. Arctic, 53-57.

      Society for Science & the Public. (1972). The Big Pipeline: Focus on Impact. Science News, 199.

      Tabbert, R. (1985). Berm in Alaskan English. American Speech, 93-94.