480 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. PBL) isan instructional method in which students lear

      Problem based learning is an instructional method in which students learn through facilitated problem solving. Problem based curricula provide students with guided experience in learning through solving complex, real-world problems. Rating: 9/10

    1. There are many different theories of adult learning, including: andragogy, neuroscience, experiential learning, self-directed learning, and transformational learning. All these theories have one goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner. 

      adult learning theories including andragogy, experiential learning

  2. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. emphasis on understanding subject matter, means that teachers must learnmore about the subjects they teach, and how students learn these subjects.
    1. Emotional learning involves meddling with deeply personal, private aspectsof workers’ lives in an effort to influence and shape their emotions, some-times with constructive and sometimes with destructive results. Two aspectsof emotion have particular relevance in the workplace: emotional intelli-gence and emotion labor.
  3. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Articulate what they know; 2. reflect on what they have learned; 3. support the internal negotiation of meaning making; 4. construct personal representations of meaning; and 5. support intentional, mindful thinking

      what technology should do in an online course to reach adults

    2. Since online learning has a different setting from the conventional classroom,online educators need to use some special techniques and perceptions to leadto success. Moreover, adults have special needs and requirements as learnerscompared with children and adolescents, thus online educators should knowhow adults can learn best because of their special characteristics. Philosophicaland methodological shifts also affect instruction. Many researchers havesuggested that constructivism should be applied in distance education. Thus,this paper attempts to examine the impact of constructivism in online learningenvironments when focusing on adult learners. The author develops the con-nection between constructivism and adult learning theory. In addition, thepaper proposes instructional guidelines using the constructivist approach inonline learning for adults.
  4. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. The tips center on five concepts: building relationships, positive focus, communication, partnership, and support. Working to improve these elementshelps create an emotionallyintelligent work environment where all employees feel they are valued and their opinions are respected. When leaders identify strengths-based strategies to build relationships, approach interactions with a positive perspective, develop positive communication strategies to support teachers, and identify additional ways to support them, they empower the teachers they work with tothrive, not just survive,in the earlychildhood setting.
  5. s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Workplace-relatedlearningis learning that is related to the firm in which the learner is employed and that is supported at least to some extent by their employer, but that is notfoundationalor higher education. Individuals may engage in this type of learning for the purposeof learning a new job, improving their job performance, for professional development, as an employee benefit or because it is required by legislation.
    2. Key dimensions of adult learning activities

      form, provider, payer, purpose, duration, design, delivery, instructor quality, credential

    3. Fivebroad types of adult learning

      Adult learning types including Foundational, higher education, workplace, personal, social. Includes a list of examples of the types of learning this includes in each category.

    1. The  Use  of  Mobile  Devices  for  Academic  Purposes  at  the  University  of  Washington:  Current  State  and  Future  Prospects

      Professional development opportunities and incentives for faculty to integrate mobile devices and as a teaching and learning tool.

    1. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

      Studies faculty provided with tablet computers and peer mentoring workshops to help increase understanding and use of mobile devices in pedogogical approaches

    1. Faculty Alert: You Can't Put the Mobile Genie Back in the Bottle

      Use of mobile devices in academic environments remains low despite the fact students demand it. However laptops are relatively common and accepted. There is growth in acceptance that mobile devices can contribute to student learning, however faculty adoption is slow.

    1. The ITL department at The Ohio State University at Mansfield has six primary themes: (a) developmentally appropriate practice, (b) integrated curriculum, (c) literature-based instruction, (d) classroom-based inquiry, (e) diversity and equity issues, and (f) technology integration. The goal for technology integration, like the other themes in the program, is to integrate the theme into each course of the program, when appropriate. For example, instructors find ways to integrate children’s literature into each of the methods courses, whether it is a mathematics, science, or social studies methods course. The goal is to integrate the common themes of the program throughout the methods courses and the other graduate courses leading up to student teaching.
    1. Dirk Schneckenberg is an Associate Professor of Strategy and Innovation and through this article looks at the use of technology environments as used by European professors.

      Rating: 5/10. The European higher education market is very different than the U.S.

    1. Sean Cavanagh, Associate Editor for Education Week, writes about the use of technology to benefit the career development of students. This article focuses on the K-12 sector, but this implementation at this level is important because it will influence these students when they pursue their career choices, often in Higher Education. This article outlines specific technologies and partnerships that schools are utilizing and shows the investment that students show when given these career opportunities to guide themselves toward.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. Author Melissa A. Venable, Ph.D. has spent her career working in career development, technology and instructional design. The article outlines technology options for career professionals to use with distance learners and how to conduct an assessment to ensure needs are being met.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. Author Catherine C. Schifter has had a long background in Educational Psychology and this article from 1999 shows her dedication to the field and provides an analysis of educators in distance learning and the evaluation that Dr. Schifter did of these programs and the motivation of faculty members who were teaching these courses at the time.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. D. Christopher Brooks, Director of Research, and Mark McCormack, Senior Director of Analytics & Research, at EDUCAUSE bring together this comprehensive report that outlines Higher Education trends for 2019. This report does feel more technical in nature, but they bring it together in a way that is laid out to be reader friendly. The 20-year technology predictions are valuable and there is a focus on using the report to plan for the future.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. This article is authored by Farouk Dey, formerly of Stanford University and currently the Vice Provost for Integrative Learning and Life Design at Johns Hopkins. Dey offers an overview of the transformation that college career services have gone through over the past 100 years and showcases 10 areas where career services will continue to change in the future, including the scope of how technology will allow for a wider reach.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article brings together several higher education professional who all work for Georgia Tech. They are able to touch on different areas of how technology has shaped their work and the reach it has allowed their university.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. Ashley Norris is the Chief Academic Officer at ProctorU, an organization that provides online exam proctoring for schools. This article has an interesting overview of the negative side of technology advancements and what that has meant for student's ability to cheat. While the article does culminate as an ad, of sorts, for ProctorU, it is an interesting read and sparks thoughts on ProctorU's use of both human monitors for testing but also their integration of Artificial Intelligence into the process.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. This report is a supplemental piece specifically for Higher Education in response to the National Education Technology plan. The report is a lengthy read but offers a combination of data, examples, case studies and additional resources. The report focuses on the changing landscape of higher education and the changing qualities of what a student in college looks like (i.e. not the traditionally known 18 year old, fresh out of high school). The report also acknowledges the history fo traditional learning (i.e. paper and pencil) and how higher educational not only needs to embrace technology for the classroom use but also for the analytics implications that can help with topics such as retention.

      Rating: 10/10. Very in depth article, packed with examples and recommendations.

    1. Author Tom Vander Ark, also author of Getting Smart: How Digital Learning is Changing the World, brings a reflection of what ends up being 10 trends and 10 suggestions on how to develop impact in relation to the trends. The article is straight forward in the trends, but also does offer platform and educational examples to enhance the content.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. The article, published in Cornell University's React publication, is an overview of technology that is currently being used in the classroom. There is an overview of interactive abilities using these technologies and a conclusion that technology should always be used to enhance and not replace.

      Rating: 6/10. Short.

    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. Author Ted Mitchell is the President of the American Council on Education. The article outlines solid numbers of Higher Education demographics and the changes that have occurred over the years and what that means for the future of students, especially those who have lived their entire lives in a digital era. The article is a great approach to reflecting on the future of technology and questions we can answer in this area and is not so much a focus on certain technologies.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. Scott L. Howell is the Assistant to the Dean of Continuing Education at Brigham Young University and has a long career track record in the area of instructional design and online learning. The article is a bit ambitious in tackling 32 trends, but provides a good review of additional literature during each addressed trend.

      Rating: 9/10. The article itself is interesting, but its best use is the direction towards additional readings that it offers.

    1. The author, Susan Grajek, formerly of Yale University is the Vice President for Communities and Research at EDUCAUSE. Grajek brings together 5 leaders in higher education and technology to discuss the future of technology in the higher education arena. The article addresses the progress that needs to be made, especially in the adult education portion of higher eduction and acknowledges that the traditional 18-22 college student population is very small and that there is so much more of the market that needs to be reached.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. This article discusses adult learners who connected with industry professionals in a career exploration course that focused around technology and coding. The program is hoping to show other places that focus on adult learning a model that would work for adult learners to gain access to industry.

      Rating: 6/10. Interesting article, but not really a focus on how they effectively engaged the adult learns in the program or their approach to actually developing the course and curriculum.

    1. This article is a study of both in-person and online courses and the affect of internet usage on the student's engaged int those courses. The article notes how saturated the learning environment has become and their approach to using student self-reported data to measure engagement. The authors provide an extensive review of prior literature on both technology and student engagement topics. The data should be reviewed with caution, as it is outlined by the authors that the questions have not been thoroughly vetted for validity and reliability.

      Rating: 6/10. The article had positive results, but the data questions being untested is a bit concerning. The article is also from 2009, and the landscape has changed much since then.

    1. This journal article, written by Amaury Nora, who is currently the Dean for Research at the University of Texas San Antonio and Blanca Plazas Snyder who was pursuing a degree in educational psychology at the time this article as written. The author's bring an honest review of technology and include the benefits, the downfalls and they identify areas where more research needs to be conducted (especially around student persistence).

      Rating: 9/10. The article is informative and takes many perspectives. The only flaw is that when discussing technology in Higher Education, this article is from 2008, but it was also helpful to get the perspective from 10 years ago.

    1. This article provides a review of a video based career exploration tool that was tested in a community college setting. While the article is essentially an ad for the resource, it does a great job of outlining the types of users in Higher Education who would benefit from this virtual access to career services, including access to employers, mentors, resume help, etc. The article shows how this type of technology can have a great impact on populations such as low-income adults and technical workforce programs.

      Rating: 9/10. Even though this article is for a specific product, I felt that it outlined the benefits in a way that could be applied to other products or technologies.

  6. Mar 2019
    1. The world’s largest selection of courses

      Udemy is an online platform where experts in various fields can create paid courses. You can learn languages, web design, photography, musical instruments all in your own time. The platform also allows for extensive ranking and reviews to be put on instructors and courses to keep the quality high. Instruction is inexpensive and self-paced. it is larger aimed at teenagers and adult learners and focuses on skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Designing Technology for Adult Learners: Applying Adult Learning Theory

      Discusses how adult learning theory can be applied for digital learning for adults. It suggests making sure interactions are built on real world and relevant situations, that learners and go at their own pace, they are allowed to reflect on their learning, and interact with each other and different points of view. Rating 10/10

    1. This article discusses that technology rich classroom research is lacking in the research world. This paper created a scale in which it could evaluate classroom environments. The authors tested this scale and determined it was a good starting framework for how to improve classroom environments. This scale could be useful later in class when evaluating technologies.Rating 9/10 for help assessment techniques

    1. This paper addresses the question about how today’s modern schools can prepare learners for the future in the age of technology. The response to this question is discussion around innovative learning environments that involve the use of technology. Technology has been a concern for the rapid change in the educational landscape and this paper aims to highlight transformation and innovation in relation to technology for teaching and learning. 9/10 for helpful diagrams and tables.

    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

    1. This paper discusses the idea that design is responsible for developing learning and teaching in technology rich environments. This paper argues Cultural Historical Activity Theory. This paper uses this perspective to discuss their ideas of design in connection with the digital age. This paper is written from the perspective German, Nordic, Russian and Vygotskyan concepts that seek to define the relationship between learning and teaching in relation to design. Rating 9/10 for mixing design with digital learning

  7. eds.a.ebscohost.com.libproxy.nau.edu eds.a.ebscohost.com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. The purpose of this book is to help learners plan ,develop and deliver online training programs for adults in the workplace. This book can be understood as a guide for training managers, instructional designers, course developers and educators who are looking to transition from classroom material to self-paced instructional programs.The main purpose of this book is for people who deliver training programs to be able to design programs for online. Most importantly, the learners needs are addressed in development. Rating 7/10 material is interesting and relevant but slightly outdated.

    1. Beyond the Click: Rethinking Assessment of an Adult Professional Development MOOC

      Examines the design and implementation of a MOOC about flipped teaching. It used digital surveys and the LMS system to gauge participant experiences and expectations. A unique aspect of this MOOC is that it asked participants to set what level of activity they expected to have in the program: active, passive, drop-in, observer. And it found that 60% of people engaged directly at that level. This is useful for designing online education experience and connecting participants with each other and in the classroom based upon their learning goals.

    1. This article is about technology integration in the classroom and how to support teachers and schools during the process. It provides recommendations on how to handle distractions and the level of engagement that should be happening between peers. This article takes a deep dive into learning in general and how it prepares students for the real world. Rating: 7/10

    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. At a recent keynote speech (2016), Richard Culatta, former director of the Office of Educational Technology for the US Department of Education, noted that more than half of higher education enrollments for 2016 are nontraditional students.

      Reinventing higher education is essential for diverse learners. A study in 2016 found that more than half of higher education students are "nontraditional students." Meaning they need special accommodations. One essential accommodation of online learning is that students can watch or reread content multiple times if needed. This is in contrast to a traditional classroom where the lecture can only be heard once. Also, while text only information is not for everyone, it is still essential to blind students. But, alternatives such as slide shows must also be present. To add in more technology one must involve administration, staff and faculty before jumping in too quickly.

      Rating 6/10

    2. Adult students have a higher incidence of disability and are less likely to seek accommodations than the general student population, so it is critical that institutions of higher education anticipate their needs, especially in online classes.

      This article provides statistics about the number of adult learners who learn online with a disability and how these numbers need to be addressed. The author observes that adult learning are least likely to ask for help and it's the designers job to assess their work to make it more accessible. This article provides recommendations on how to become more familiar with technology and what guidelines people should be following. Rating: 10/10 for addressing accessibility among adult learners and providing recommendations.

    1. The Career Curriculum Continuum

      Discusses the place of universities in lifelong learning, especially with the advancement of technology in education in the workforce. The career curriculum continuum, includes free and self-paced options such as MOOCs, educational video on Youtube, and Wikis, but also suggests more structured learning placed in context. Universities can offer this as short courses that are cheaper and offer more options for pathways to a full degree program. It also suggests professional certificates for expanding the skills of those already working. Digital institutions will be the most widely used methods for consuming knew knowledge and advancing skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Q&A: How to Develop ‘Program Architecture’

      Discusses they ways in which Kacey Thorne of WGU, outlines plans for developing underlying competencies for online programs. Program architecture refers to the connect of skills and competencies for specific industries linking back to a network of what students will learn in school through offered programs. This is necessary for creating relevant programs that teach translatable skills for the real world after college. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Web 2.0 to teach Web 2.0: A case study in aligningteaching, learning and assessment with professionalpractice

      Research article. Discussed the use of web 2.0 including blogs, wikis, and social media as a method of information sharing that is impacting education through teaching and learning management. The work suggests that learning outcomes, activities, and assessment have to be in alignment to create effective learning experiences and uses a case study within an information management program in which students use various web 2.0 tools and document their use .

    1. This article is for teachers and contains multiple resources about how to integrate technology into the classroom and the different types of technology integration. This article is full of examples and ideas teachers can use to facilitate technology in the classroom. Rating: 9/10 for use of examples and practical application.

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. What Makes for Effective Adult Learning

      This article provides a short overview or strategies and techniques to make adult learning effective. This article quotes adult learning researches like Knowles to provide information about meaningful learning experiences. This article provides idea for activities that fit in the category of affective adult learning.

    1. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      Research paper. This work highlights how scaffolding, meaning students work through their learning in stages with support from digital technology, making adjustments to their learning environment as needed as they progress through material. Self-evaluations are a critical component of this to help reflect on the content learned. Scaffolding helps students determine not only what to do but how to do it until they are ready to learn more fully on their own. Rating 6/10

    1. 4Vision: Preparing Learning Communities to succeed in College and Careers in a global society through technology.Vision and Goals

      This proposal outlines a draft for a technology plan for Arizona regarding adult education. This plan outlines the goals of the plan and how Arizona can address them moving forward. This plan outlines trends for the future in technology and acknowledges challenges that might come up later down the line. This plan also reviews teaching standards and instruction, as well as operations for the future. Rating 6/10 for being a draft, but with good ideas!

    1. The Accessibility Guide

      Arizona State University has a public webpage i nregards to accessibility and instructional design. The web page links to multiple online resources that outline accessibility standards across the United States. Additionally, this webpage provides an accessibility guide for anyone to download for instructional design related projects. Rating 9/10 for being a helpful resource that is easily accessible.

    1. Online is clearly where the growth is, especially when it comes to enrolling adults.

      This article is based around the idea that online education increases access for learners but lacks in completion data. This article provides data around the United States from a study conducted over a few years. Generally speaking this article encourages blended learning rather than all online to obtain better outcomes for adult learners. Rating 7/10 for use of graphs and evidence from data.

    1. This article reviews three learning styles and gives examples of how they fit into the three learning domains. Additionally this article reviews assumptions about adult learning and what it might actually mean. Lastly, this article reviews the instructional system design model and breaks down it's components. Rating 7/10 for lack of discussion but helpful tables

    1. This fact sheet provides an overview of adult learning theories in a digestible format with citations throughout the sheet. The citations are from various experts on adult learning theory and examples are provided as well. Rating: 8/10 Clear and concise overview of adult learning theories.

    1. This article focuses on the adult learning environment from the teachers perspective. This article explains that there are many types of environments an adult learner experiences and why each of them are important. After reviewing the environments, the author provides recommendations from a professional perspective. Rating: 8/10 for providing an in-depth overview of different learning environments and how they apply to adult learners.

    1. This page is free resource to download a book about how people learn. This selected chapter provides recommendations for assessments and feedback in learning environments in general which also applies to adult learning. In addition to these examples, this chapter provides a section on theory and framework to better understand the overall topics. Rating: 10/10 Great free, open source resource with reputable information about learning.

    2. This page enables one to download the book "How People Learn" for free and allows one to link to related content. This book was not originally written for adult learning but is included here because it is a valuable resource, an entire book provided for free, with immediate relevance to adult learning even if every example, etc. is not based on adult learning. Rating 4/5

    1. Active learning approaches

      This website is a blog hosted on an official EU platform that discusses what quality learning environments look like for adults. This webpage reviews traditional learning approaches versus active learning approaches how they contribute to a quality learning environment. Rating: 6/10 for including an easy to read comparison table but lacking in discussion.

    1. The “silver surfer” discourse reinforces the notion that older adults stand to benefit from ICTs in various ways, and that the ability to make use of new technology is a ready means through which to “bridge the generation gap”

      This article refers to an older generation of adults and how the intend to adopt technologies or why they choose not too. The author discusses how researchers know very little about the outcomes of older adults using technology and how it impacts their lives. Additionally, this article provides recommendations for how to accommodate older generations through the use of information and communications technologies. Rating: 8/10 for focus on a different class of adults

    1. The purpose of this paper is to propose an in-structional-design theory that supports a sense of community.

      This article addresses the fact that new instructional design theories and methods are needed to keep up with new technologies and ways of learning. This article reviews instructional design tools for creating a sense of community online for learners. Additionally, this article discusses the differences between design theory and descriptive theory as it pertains to instructional design. 6/10 This article is very specific and might only be relevant for a specific study or topic

    1. Laboratory activities and constructivism are two notions that have been playing significant roles in science education. Despite common beliefs about the importance of laboratory activities, reviews reported inconsistent results about the effectiveness of laboratory activities. Since laboratory activities can be expensive and take more time, there is an effort to introduce virtual laboratory activities. This study aims at exploring the learning environment created by a virtual laboratory and a real laboratory. A quasi experimental study was conducted at two grade ten classes at a state high school in Bandung, Indonesia. Data were collected using a questionnaire called Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) before and after the laboratory activities. The results show that both types of laboratories can create constructivist learning environments. Each type of laboratory activity, however, may be stronger in improving certain aspects compared to the other. While a virtual laboratory is stronger in improving critical voice and personal relevance, real laboratory activities promote aspects of personal relevance, uncertainty and student negotiation. This study suggests that instead of setting one type of laboratory against the other, lessons and follow up studies should focus on how to combine both types of laboratories to support better learning.

      In this peer-reviewed study, two tenth-grade classes were analyzed as they used either a virtual or a real laboratory to accomplish learning tasks. The question raised was whether a real or a virtual laboratory was more conducive to constructivist learning. The study concluded that a real lab is better than a virtual one to trigger constructivist learning. This is of importance to me because I teach adults about software in both virtual and real laboratories, and when I develop content, I try to use the constructivist theory as much as possible as I find it works best for my audience, in addition to making novel content more relatable. Please note: I could not put the annotation on the text because the paper opened in a popup page that does not work with Hypothes.is. 7/10

    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Adults & Learning: How to Provide for Working Professionals

      The Digital Marketing Institute published this article to help those who provide training for professional adults. It echoes a lot of what I've read in other articles about teaching adults: The goals are different, and they have different needs from the instructor than children do. I liked that this article mentioned that many professional adults find technology to be a barrier, but I wish there were more information about it. The article discussed several of the biggest challenges for adult learners, which was a nice change from the quintessential adult learner article that focuses on what learners need. I also want to know what they don't need. Some of the barriers to learning include a lack of time, responsibilities, financial stressors, fear of technology, and trouble identifying the ideal learning path. 8/10

    1. Training Older Adults To Use New Technology

      This article, published in the Journals of Gerontology, discusses a study that focused on teaching older adults to use technology. This is often discussed in a practical sense, with many how-to's. This article, however, discusses the theory behind gerontological learning. Older adults don't generally learn the same way younger adults do. Therefore, it is important to provide them with practice that shows tasks have continuity, to ensure the important task components are focused on strongly, and to consider whether the learning goals are appropriate for the learner. Representative design is addressed here. This is the first time I've heard of representative design. I teach many people over the age of 60 to use technology, so it is important for me to know the theory that will help them learn best. Interestingly,this article mentioned that performance should be assessed based on a comparison of the older adult's environment. I wish I could use that more in my work, but it's a young person's world now. 9/10

    1. Engaging  Adult  Learners

      This article discusses some attributes that are unique to adult learners, such as that their learning is selective, self-directed, and often focused on solving problems. Therefore, it is important that instructors enable students to be autonomous and show them why it is important. Often in my instructional design, I start with the WIIFM (What's In It For Me?). This article supports my idea that my adult learners will choose to learn when it can solve a problem for them. This article also discusses active learning from an adult perspective, such as Socratic teaching. 9/10

    1. What the Research Says About Teaching Adults

      Colorado Community Colleges published this article to discuss research about teaching adults, focusing strongly on Knowles's six principles of andragogy. The main idea behind Knowles's principles is that adults learn because they decided to--because the information is relevant to them and they can benefit from attaining that knowledge. Therefore, the article states, activities that ask adult learners to discuss problems with each other will help them learn. This can be useful as I design instruction. 7/10

    1. Behaviorism

      Learning-Theories.com published a very handy few pages that describe various learning theories. This is a quick, straightforward, simple way to access information on the different theories. This article, Behaviorism, explains that the theory assumes learners learn by responding to external stimuli in their environment. Learning under behaviorism is characterized by a change in the learner's behavior. I use this in my horse training as I use both positive reinforcement (clicker training) and negative reinforcement (pressure-release) to structure my horse's behaviors. Behaviorism can be translated to human work, too. I've used TAG teaching (clicker training for humans) to teach people to get on and off horses with ease and also to trim horses' hooves. I also use it to clicker train my cats! 6/10

    1. Cognitivism

      Cognitivism challenge behaviorism by positing that humans are more complex than simple lumps that respond to external stimuli. Cognitivism claims that people must involve themselves in their learning and take an active role. In short, when information enters the mind, it must be processed before it becomes a change in behavior. 6/10

    1. Constructivism

      Constructivism is my favorite learning theory. It states that in order to learn, learners must experience something, then reconcile that experience with their previous experiences. The learner will create and test hypotheses based on all experiences, and prove those hypotheses right or wrong based on future experiences. They will then use what they learned from those hypotheses to create new ones. I frequently use this in my instructional design. 6/10

    1. Design-Based Research Methods (DBR)

      Design-based research (DBR) tries to connect learning theory and practice. It puts theories to the test and is an important part of siting through which parts of theories work well, contradict each other, or contradict themselves. This page provides several of the characteristics of design-based studies, as well as the needs and issues important to studying learning. 7/10

    1. Adult Learning Theory

      This article by the University of Utah discusses Lindeman's and Knowles's theories on adult learning. Andragogy uses the teacher differently from pedagogy: the teacher in an adult learning environment becomes a facilitator instead of the knower. I think this is an important distinction to make for people who go from teaching children to teaching adults. There are two of these people on my team at work. One taught third grade and one taught sixth grade, and both of them tend to try to put the instructor in the knower's position instead of the facilitator's position. They have to catch themselves often and rework some instruction to be more student-focused instead of content-focused. 8/10

    1. Overview of Learning Theories

      The Berkeley Graduate Division published an interesting and straightforward table of learning theories. The table compares behaviorism, cognitive constructivism, and social constructivism in four ways: the view of knowledge, view of learning, view of motivation, and implications for teaching. This is an easy-to-read, quick resource for those who would like a side-by-side comparison of common theories. 9/10

    1. Instructor-Led Training

      SharedBook.com published this article about the state of Instructor-Led Training (ILT) in 2018. It claims that technology has not caused instructor-led training demand to decrease, but instead as simply altered it to provide instructors with new tools. It is important to note how technology changes the delivery of ILT, because now trainers are able to reach more people in a variety of places, and have far more at their fingertips to help facilitate training than they did before technology became so pervasive. Technology also helps with assessing learner outcomes, as it provides more analytical tools. Hybrid ILT is also becoming more common as a super-training platform that combines strengths of E-learning with ILT. It is important, however, to ensure technology is used purposefully in technology-heavy ILT environments. 9/10

    1. Effective Integration of Technology and Instructor-Led Training to Promote Soft Skills Mastery

      The Access Technologies Group published this article to discuss purposeful use of technology in ILT environments whose goal was to teach soft skills. The article claims that blended learning is the ideal delivery technique because it provides the ease of e-learning with the face-to-face time necessary to develop soft skills. It is critical to the success of the training program to integrate e-learning and ILT seamlessly to ensure the two produce synergy without limiting themselves or each other. It is also important that the learners are provided with an environment that suits their learning needs best. Technology and ILT can both provide ways to meet those needs, and where one lacks, the other can fill in. 8/10

    1. The Benefits of Instructor-Led Training

      This web page, published by SkillJar, discusses the importance of instructor-led training: the immediacy and warmth of a human that provides excellent experience for learners that they value highly. It is important to use these strengths to the trainer's advantage when designing and delivering training because it makes the training more effective. 5/10

    1. Learning Technologies that Increase the Impact of Classroom Training

      Training Industry published this article about some learning technologies that increase the impact of classroom training. These can include class-oriented webpages, multimedia presentations, and activities, as well as web-based scoring systems and supplements. For instance, learners could collectively create a blog or a webcast and use those tools to communicate with each other to help facilitate learning. This is helpful when teaching a technology-fluent group that is excited to do hands-on activities. 6/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

    1. 7 Gamification Strategies for Corporate Training

      This article by the Tech Edvocate discusses seven ways to gamify corporate training. I find this personally important because I often use games to teach my adult learners about some of the most boring topics. (For instance, I'm currently creating training to explain the theory and calculations behind a very complex distribution management software tool. Imagine explaining how a calculator works to provide correct answers to math equations, then multiply that a few times. It's tough.) According to this article, in order to gamify, instructors can specify learning objectives, use reward systems, incorporate social interaction, and challenge learners to make gamified learning successful. 8/10

    1. As one understands professional development in educational technology as potential transformational learning experiences, one can begin to reconceptualize its outcomes.

      This article provides an in-depth view from the teachers perspective about how to prepare for technology in their learning environments. Through professional development training, teachers and instructors can gain new knowledge about how to incorporate new technologies into their practice. This article focuses on one study and concludes that new technology needs to be introduced slowly for best practices.

    1. one main goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner.

      This article takes on Adult Learning from an Instructional Design perspective. This article reviews 3 adult learning theories and why it's important for Instructional Designers to keep these theories in mind the facilitate the learning process. Rating: 9/10 for easy reading, overview of learning theories and emphasis on instructional design

    1. The Wired Classroom: Leveraging Technology to Engage Adult Learners

      This article discusses how even though instructors may be hesitant to include new technologies in their learning environments, doing so can enhance the student experience. It specifically explore the use of twitter for classroom discussions, simulation tools, and the LMS systems universities use currently to support online work. Soliciting feedback from students to ask how tools are working for them is important for evolving the classroom to fit student needs.

    1. U.S. Through these stories from and discussions with our Beacons and partners, we offer educators and developers specific examples of how to incorporate technology into adult learning in highly effective yet affordable ways

      Digital promise is an organization that connects adult learners with methods to implement technology in useful ways to improve education. The website hosts a network of educators and the programs they offer to improve basic math and literacy skills in U.S. adults to help with job training and career advancement. There is also a mico-credentialing program they extend to training programs that endorse those that have learned or gained specific skills. Rating 5/10

    1. Report: Why Tech for Adult Learning So Often Misses the Mark

      Popular article. This article overviews the U.S. Department of Education LINCS system report which shows that there is a disconnect between those that design adult learning technology and the stakeholders (learners and employers) that plan to use it. Often technology is retrofitted, as it was originally intended for K-12 and won't work in the ways adult learners and educators need for them. One of the main ways to circumvent this is to design technology for a specific problem that needs to be solved, instead of starting with the solution. Rating 4/10

    1. Towards a Mobile Augmented Reality Prototype for Corporate Training: A New Perspective

      Research Article. I found this article especially interesting because it promotes the use of mobile devices for online learning. This focuses on corporate training, but it is easy to see how it could be applied across areas and fields. There is a specific focus on the use of virtual and real objects during education experiences to create experience-based learning outcomes. Rating 4/10

    1. Toward constructivism for adult learners in online learning environments

      Research article. This paper explores how constructivism is specifically useful for adult education in the online environment. It is especially important for adult learners to interact with each other in order to creating meaningful collaborative experiences. It is also important for online educators to create and environment where students can share and discuss ideas in a safe space. It should also require high-order thinking skills and problem solving that relates to their real lives. Rating 10/10

    1. Application  of  Virtual  and  Augmented  Reality  tothe  Field  of  Adult  Education

      Research Article from the Adult Education Research Conference. This article examines the history of VR as a tool to train military personnel, and medical professionals and how future directions of VR could be used for other adult education situations especially due to their low risk learning environment. The authors examine how VR could also be used in gaming, arts, entertainment, marketing and business fields. This is important because VR environments also allow students to exploring changing technology and practice self-learning. Rating 6/10

    1. Report: It's Time for Ed Tech to Tackle the Adult Learner

      This article recommends the way in which education technology should adapt to be aimed at adult learners. Specifically that education should all students to assess themselves as they go and fill in any missing gaps in knowledge. It should also be relevant to their life needs, and connect their own experiences back into the learning environment. I feel most of this is known in adult learning theory in general, however this article is really aimed at those outside the industry and is a very helpful summary in this way. Rating 7/10

    1. Top 10 Tools For The Digital Classroom

      Article overviews tools in technology that are useful for bringing learners together in the classroom, especially in ways that enhance their interaction with digital media and each other. Although many of them seem to be aimed at younger learners I feel like some of the tools, like Quizlet, and Prezi are especially useful for adult learners. Rating 10/10

    1. An investigation into the attraction and completion rates of MOOCs Sergey Kruchinin

      Research Paper. Discusses the use of MOOCs and their completion rates as tools for education. MOOCs are often touted as the best way to get education to the popular masses. The study shows that MOOCs coming from universities with major names on just a few platforms like Coursera tend to be the most successful in terms of completion rate. Courses that have auto grading features are more attractive to students, probably because they get feedback immediately. Rating 4/10

    1. Adult Learning in the Context of Comparative Higher Education

      Research Paper. Although education is determined by "engagement, empowerment, experience, and evidence" the way adults learned, and what they have learned across societies differs greatly and impacts the effectiveness of higher education and problem solving. Adults as significant instigators of global change need opportunities for literacy development, dialogue, acquisition of self-reliance skills, and the ability to adapt to change. Rating 5/10

    1. This webpage discusses different learning styles for adults, the principles of adult learning theory and different instructional design models for the the present and future. This webpage reviews andragogy and adult learning theory from the works of Malcolm Knowles. This article comes from Rutgers University and provides additional resources for adult learners. Ratings: 7/10 for helpful, short overview

    1. YouTube playlist of my classes' Student Production Award winning projects from the Ohio Valley chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (the organization behind the Emmy awards).