69 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. Using wikis for collaborative learning: Assessing collaboration through contribution

      Through a study of freshman students, the author aimed to determine the success of the Wiki for collaboration. Results revealed variances in learner responses and use of the tool. Lack of use was explained by individual barriers (family, social, work) and system barriers (wiki design). The authors conclude that for the Wiki to be an effective, collaborative tool, additional resources must be provided to the learner, and the Wiki must be meaningful in its design to foster that participation. 7/10

    1. How To Make Online Corporate Learning Fun During Lockdown

      (Available in text or audio.) This article provides basic principles (agenda, duration) and technologies (gamification, discussion boards) and activities to keep employees engaged in online learning. While this provides strategy, it does not provide implementation guidance within the corporate environment. (2/10)

    1. Description: The purpose of this article is to explore the idea of using Wikis inside the classroom. Wikis are considered great tools because they are flexible and promote collaboration. The author discusses the different ways teachers can implement wikies from groups creating and presenting a single wiki to each student creating their own and commenting on their peers wikis. Furthermore, Wikis are familiar to students which helps promote engagement. The last section describes how to create Wikis and integrate them into a classroom setting.

      Rating: 10/10

      Reason for the rating: This topic fully engages the reader with easy to understand text and diagrams. There are plenty of citations to support the theories.

    1. Description: This article outlines three phases for collaborative teaching: Planning, implementing, and reflecting. It discusses the ways teachers can support student interactions through the implementation phase by creating well-thought out activities which engage the learner. These activities should focus on collaboration of peer ideas in order to be effective in building social and academic skills. It mentions a few examples such as discussion groups or large projects. The author gives multiple examples of the teacher's role in a collaborative setting as well as issues that may occur. The article encourages both the teacher and the students to reflect on the learning and collaboration afterwards.

      Rating: 9/10

      Reason for the rating: The author is very thorough in their research and explanation with the text. They have many citations to support their theories as well as diagrams to help illustrate their ideas. The biggest fault with the paper is that it is entirely idealistic without any reference to a case study.

  2. Sep 2020
  3. Aug 2020
  4. Jul 2020
    1. Engaging students in a three-month long project where they create their own short plays with the guidance of a workingplaywright, this festival not only allows students from St. Sylvester to explore playwriting, but to do so in collaboration with another class at a nearby Member School, St. Henry.

      Way to collaborate with places outside of the school

    2. For example, in November 2014, the Grade 3/4 class at at St. Sylvester participated in a learning project devoted to set and costume design in connection with the theatre’s production of James and the Giant Peach

      Teaching design to students, can this be a collaborative project with people from multiple locations?

    1. are grouped intentionally to provide a mix of skill levels,

      Zone of Proximal Development -Vygotsky; by mixing skill levels, students at a lower skill will learn from those at a higher skill; those at a higher skill will better understand the process/concept by helping teach those at lower skills

    1. Encouraging students to reach out to one another to solve problems not only builds collaboration skills but leads to deeper learning and understanding.

      Students can teach one another--assessment of understanding Asking each other questions before asking the teacher

      Group work empowers a student's cultivation of resilience

      Creates habits of mind

      Going over homework in groups, if no resolution to a problem, talk about it as a class, asking groupmates to help (and they are helpful--how do you inspire helpful intentions?)

      Classwork harder than homework--need to talk to one another to solve problems

      Talk about problems before taking pencil to paper

      Can you see one another; check ego at door; be willing to take risks; throw out ideas even if not fully formed, others can add to it

      Different roles to fill: discussion: scribe, mapper, moderator

      How did you do? Encourage quieter students to engage, have peers help them out somehow

      Respect individual, celebrate small victories

  5. Apr 2020
    1. choose a song and either sing along to it as a solo, duet, or group performance.

      So it necessarily starts with one of the song options provided by the platform. Users don't seem to be able to provide their own "seeds".

    1. a user can download his or her own data

      In a platform where one of the main values is collaboration, how important is it that these platforms guarantee that the user will be able to backup his/her data in case he/she wants (or is forced to) move out? Shouldn't this platforms also guarantee that one would be able to download ALL public data (or data the specific user has access to) to make sure he/she will be able to recreate the whole thing if he/she wants (or is forced) to?

  6. Jan 2020
  7. Nov 2019
    1. Integrating Technology with Bloom’s Taxonomy

      This article was published by a team member of the ASU Online Instructional Design and New Media (IDNM) team at Arizona State University. This team shares instructional design methods and resources on the TeachOnline site for online learning. "Integrating Technology with Bloom's Taxonomy" describes practices for implementing 6 principles of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in online learning. These principles include Creating, Evaluating, Analyzing, Applying, Understanding, and Remembering. The purpose of implementing this model is to create more meaningful and effective experiences for online learners. The author guides instructors in the selection of digital tools that drive higher-order thinking, active engagmenent, and relevancy. Rating 9/10

    1. Training and Development Policy Wiki

      This webpage, under the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) .gov site, provides an extensive list of technology resources that can be and have been implemented into a variety of employee deveolpment programs. These tools allow for more personalized learning, active participation, collaboration, and communication.In the first section of the site, examples of Web 2.0 tools are listed that can promote collaboration and constructive learning. You can also find technologies that are used in specific sectors, such as the Federal Government and the Private Sector. Clicking on the links redirects you to additional resources on the tech tools, including how to use them effectively and professionally for employee training. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Technology to Enhance Teaching & Learning

      This website provides technology teaching resources as part of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Center for Teaching Excellence. Users can find informational links to various technology tools that can be used for enhancing teaching and learning in online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses. On the right of the page under "Technology," users can click on the tech tools for additional resources/research on their implementation. Examples of these technologies include Blackboard LMS, PowerPoint presentation software, Google Suite products, blogs, and social media sites. Rating 8/10

  8. Jul 2019
    1. Every English class starts with a moment of quiet after which students are asked to share their energy and stress levels.

      important: I think this idea could help some students realize they are not alone in their feelings and that there are a diversity of feelings and mindsets (that change on the daily) in the classroom.

    2. In English, juniors are grouped with seniors, which helps the younger students learn how the process works by watching and learning from the older students

      there is plenty of research backing the idea that students can benefit academically and personally from learning from older/ more experienced peers

    3. on the mathematical process and not just the “right answer.”

      so crucial to actually understanding the math, and not just focusing on "being done" or "getting the right answer". Much more sustainable approach to teaching math.

    4. group tests, which, like the class worksheets, are designed to be harder than the individual assignment

      group tests need to be based on critical thinking in order to achieve the collaborative aspect of learning

    5. effective classroom geography, focus on the process, build accountability, let students teach one another, and encourage students to be in tune with one another.

      teacher taking a step back; reminds me of Deweyian philosophy

    6. resilient by aiding them with identifying their resources (peers) and testing their theories to see if they are on the right track all while developing habits of mind that form the foundation of scholarship.

      using peers to solve problems rather than directly consulting teacher for answer

  9. Mar 2019
    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

  10. Feb 2019
    1. Encouraging students to reach out to each other to solve problems and share knowledge not only builds collaboration skills, it leads to deeper learning and understanding

      Students can help each other learn by collaborating their efforts. Each student can bring a certain strength to the group so that they can all work out problems together

  11. Nov 2018
    1. Prezi is a productivity platform that allows for creation, organization, collaboration of presentations. It can be used with either mobile or desktop. Prezi integrates with slack and salesforce. RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. At the intersection of technology and pedagogy:considering styles of learning and teaching

      When examining the pedagogy of learning, teacher and student centered approaches, there is additional evidence supporting a model moving more towards technology-based learning. This articles considers the question of technology in the classroom and its' advantages/disadvantages.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example.

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  12. Aug 2018
    1. Some tools for researchers to enhance their OPR practices: hypothes.is allows you to annotate and review almost anything you find on the web, word by word, alone, or as a group. Publons  helps you to make your current and previous peer review pieces publicly available. The Winnower helps you to find reviewers for whatever published piece of information you have

      Hypothes.is could serve as group knowledge sharing tool

  13. Jul 2018
    1. The broadest (but unsatisfactory) definition of 'collaborative learning' is that it is a situation inwhich two or more people learn orattempt to learn something together.
    2. our group did not agree on any definition ofcollaborative learning. We did not even try. There is such a wide variety of uses of this term insideeach academic field

      Diverse perspectives of 'collaborative learning'

    1. Leshed and Sengers’s research reminds us that calendars are not just tools for the management of time, but are also sites of identity work where people can project to themselves and others the density of their days and apparent ‘success’ at doing it all[26]. These seemingly innocuous artifacts can thus perpetuate deeper normative logics a

      The dark side of time artifacts and the social pressure of busyness/industriousness as a virtue.

    2. CSCW has been investigating the relationship of time and work practically from its inception as a scholarly fiel

      Classic CSWC literature on time includes: groupware calendaring systems, temporal rhythm, temporal trajectories, temporal ordering, temporal artifacts.

    1. Your digestive (say: dye-JES-tiv) system started working even before you took the first bite of your pizza. And the digestive system will be busy at work on your chewed-up lunch for the next few hours — or sometimes days, depending upon what you've eaten. This process, called digestion,

      A good website option to give students for online collaborative inquiry (when having students research, list this website)

    1. Spider Web Discussion is an adaptation of the Socratic seminar in that it puts students squarely in the center of the learning process, with the teacher as a silent observer and recorder of what s/he sees students saying and doing during the discussion. Her method is used when the teacher wants students to collaboratively discuss and make meaning of a particular learning concept

      Spider web discussions for collaborative learning

    1. Record your observations 2 Share with fellow naturalists 3 Discuss your findings

      inaturalist website- really cool place to upload nature pics and correspond in discussions with others about identifying the plant or animal species

    1. Project Noah was created to provide people of all ages with a simple, easy-to-use way to share their experiences with wildlife. By encouraging your students to share their observations and contribute to Project Noah missions, you not only help students to reconnect with nature, you provide them with real opportunities to make a difference.

      Looks like a great project to get involved in! Very collaborative (both in the classroom and in online), plus integrate technology while having students explore nature

    1. Having students use self and peer evaluation sheets proved to be beneficial. When they were able to stop and reflect on the work they and their peers did, they were able to identify what was going well and what could be improved. I

      A teacher does a study on collaborative learning and reports her findings: assign specific jobs, determine gender balance of group, self and peer evaluation tools

    1. Collaboration had the same results via technology as in person, increased learning opportunities.

      Wow! I did not know this! I would think that in person collaboration produced greater results, but this is not the case. Great point of how collaboration online can be just as effective!

    2. Rather than spending a lot of time designing an artificial scenario, use inspiration from everyday problems. Real world problems can be used to facilitate project-based learning and often have the right scope for collaborative learning.

      Use real-world problems, not "artificial scenarios" for collaborative learning

    3. Decomposing a difficult task into parts to saves time. You can then assign different roles.

      Assigning different tasks/jobs to each member of the group

    4. Small groups of 3 or less lack enough diversity and may not allow divergent thinking to occur. Groups that are too large create ‘freeloading’ where not all members participate. A moderate size group of 4-5 is ideal.

      goof point about group size for collaborative learning (4-5 students in one group)

    1. Lev Vygotsky’s seminal work asserted that social interaction is a fundamental aspect of learning. And if he were alive today, he would most likely agree with the saying “two minds are better than one.” He might add, “Better yet, how about three or four?”

      Vygotsky- social interaction is fundamental in learning- group work is the perfect way to do this- 2 heads are better than one:)

  14. May 2018
    1. Dervin (1999) describes information as aninteractionally created artifact, encouraging us to turn our analytic attentionaway from problems of ‘‘access’’ and towards the ways in which informationis created in the course of collaborative work. An aspect of work that playsan important role in the creation and use of information is temporality.

      It's a shame that the meta data can't be extracted from the SBTF documents. I'll bet there is a story to tell there.

      It might be interested to do a meta-analysis of several SBTF deployment documents to understand the trajectory of its own knowledge and practices around crowdsourcing crisis data, but also to substantiate my hunch that event temporality (slow, sudden, chronic) affects the collaboration process and the data artifacts it produces.

  15. Dec 2017
    1. nteraction analysis can be partly automated.

      verbal interactions are the key!

      • Mirroring to guiding
    2. how technology can fulfil collaborative functionalitiesthat are not available in face-to-face situations

      technique #1 to promote colloboration

  16. Sep 2017
  17. Jul 2017
    1. In Collaborative Reasoning discussions, students are engaged with texts through reasoning and deliberation with one another about the multi-faceted issues raised in the text(s). The discussion is a process of teasing out and working through "big" issues; handling of ambiguity and opposing viewpoints; reasoning, exploring, evaluation and building of arguments; and holding one's own or letting go within a social context.

      Collaborative Reasoning

    1. In math, four times a year, each student is given a set of values or codes to substitute in the equations so that even though the students are working together, they have to focus on the mathematical process and not just the “right answer.” In English, the discussions are open-ended, allowing for multiple right answers.

      Yes! This is how I plan to teach science. I will give them questions but they have to find the answers.

  18. Jan 2017
    1. Affiliations— memberships, formal and informal, in online communities centeredaround various forms of media, such as Friendster, Facebook, message boards,metagaming, game clans, or MySpace).Expressions— producing new creative forms, such as digital sampling, skinning andmodding, fan videomaking, fan fiction writing, zines, mash-ups).Collaborative Problem-solving— working together in teams, formal and informal,to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (such as through Wikipedia, alternativereality gaming, spoiling).Circulations — Shaping the flow of media (such as podcasting, blogging).

      It is very interesting to see just how applicable those terms are for our everyday life!

  19. Jul 2016
    1. Page 187 On hyper authorship

      "hyper authorship” is an indicator of "collective cognition" in which the specific contributions of individuals no longer can be identified. Physics has among the highest rates of coauthorship in the sciences and the highest rates of self archiving documents via a repository. Whether the relationship between research collaborators (as indicated by the rates of coauthorship) and sharing publications (as reflected in self archiving) holds in other fields is a question worth exploring empirically.

    1. encourages students to “steal” and cite ideas from each other’s hypothes.is annotations

      This is a neat idea, but do you think that this inhibits some of the students from annotating to their full potential? If I had a great idea, I might save it for myself instead of having someone else "steal" it.

  20. Jun 2016
    1. If only 2% – 5% of all faculty and their students (who are doing renewable assignments) were active creators and improvers of OER, that would likely be sufficient.
    1. students to find three credible sources on narrative to use in a short piece of writing
    2. the possibility that learners may engage more effectively by finding their own resources to share and then seeing how others respond.
    1. Beaver and Rosen (1978) have shown how the differentialrates of scientific institutionalization in France, England,and Germany are mirrored in the relative output of coau-thored papers.

      bibliography tying rate of coauthorship to professionalisation of science

    2. In some domains, path-breaking work is nec-essarily the outcome of collaborative activity rather thanindividualistic scholarship, a fact reflected in the modestproportion of federal research funds which is allocated toindividual investigators rather than teams. Collaborationsare a necessary feature of much, though by no means all,contemporary scientific research.

      in some domains, collaboration is necessary. Hence the preference for team grants

    3. n general terms, the lone authorstereotype ignores the fact that a great deal of the scholarlyliterature is the product of a “socio-technical production andcommunications network” (Kling, McKim, Fortuna, &King, 1999),

      A great deal of scientific production is the product of a "socio-technical production and communications network"

  21. May 2016
    1. Students who were part of the experimental group (35.41%, N = 7) performed worse than their peers (38.54%, N = 43) onthe pre-test. On the post-test students who participated in collaborative note-taking did significantly better (72.49%) than their peers (64.17%). Presumably this means that the students who participated in the study had lower levels of baseline knowledge at the outset, but they had a more robust level of knowledge by the end of the class and the experiment than did their peers who had taken notes individually. The difference of 8.28% is strikingly similar to the difference in grades. As the results indicate, these are difficult tests for students. The experimental group did not just perform almost a letter grade better in grades; they also performed almost a letter grade better on the pre/post tests

      Pre-post tests showed better gains (again by about 8%) for collaborative note-takers than for students who did not take notes collaboratively.

    2. Table 2 shows that the average grade across all classes and groups (experimental and control) was 72.02%. Students in the experimental group had an average grade of 79.66%, while the control group average was a 71.87% (a difference of 7.79%). Students who participated in collaborative notes performed nearly a single letter grade better than did their peers in the same classes. The ANOVA result found significance at the .01 level (F = 5.47, p < 0.01). Further, Bartlett’s test for equal variance returned a non-significant value, indicating a reliable ANOVA model. It is possible to say there was a statistically significant difference between the control group and the experimental group.

      Students who took notes collaborative scored nearly 8% higher on their course grades than students who did not.

  22. Apr 2016
  23. Jan 2016
    1. In this regard, it’s interesting to note that the viewing of TV programs at the time of their broadcast went up 20% with the advent of Twitter, indicating a desire to consume collaboratively. My ten year experience with social reading suggests that we might see a similar increase if long-form texts began appearing in platforms enabling people to gather in the margins with trusted friends and colleagues.
  24. Nov 2015
  25. Jan 2014
    1. Responsibility, myself versus others. It may appear that responses to the question of responsibility are bifurcated between "Myself" and all other parties combined. However, respondents who identified themselves as being responsible were more likely than not to identify additional parties that share that responsibility. Thus, curatorial responsibility is seen as a collaborative effort. (The "Nobody" category is a slight misnomer here as it also includes non-responses to this question.)

      This answers my previous question about this survey item:

      https://hypothes.is/a/QrDAnmV8Tm-EkDuHuknS2A