10 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2022
    1. A 2019 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences supports Wieman’s hunch. Tracking the intellectual advancement ofseveral hundred graduate students in the sciences over the course of four years,its authors found that the development of crucial skills such as generatinghypotheses, designing experiments, and analyzing data was closely related to thestudents’ engagement with their peers in the lab, and not to the guidance theyreceived from their faculty mentors.

      Learning has been shown to be linked to engagement with peers in social situations over guidance from faculty mentors.

      Cross reference: David F. Feldon et al., “Postdocs’ Lab Engagement Predicts Trajectories of PhD Students’ Skill Development,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116 (October 2019): 20910–16


      Are there areas where this is not the case? Are there areas where this is more the case than not?

      Is it our evolution as social animals that has heightened this effect? How could this be shown? (Link this to prior note about social evolution.)

      Is it the ability to scaffold out questions and answers and find their way by slowly building up experience with each other that facilitates this effect?

      Could this effect be seen in annotating texts as well? If one's annotations become a conversation with the author, is there a learning benefit even when the author can't respond? By trying out writing about one's understanding of a text and seeing where the gaps are and then revisiting the text to fill them in, do we gain this same sort of peer engagement? How can we encourage students to ask questions to the author and/or themselves in the margins? How can we encourage them to further think about and explore these questions? Answer these questions over time?

      A key part of the solution is not just writing the annotations down in the first place, but keeping them, reviewing over them, linking them together, revisiting them and slowly providing answers and building solutions for both themselves and, by writing them down, hopefully for others as well.

  2. Nov 2021
  3. Sep 2021
    1. I love this outline/syllabus for creating a commonplace book (as a potential replacement for a term paper).

      I'd be curious to see those who are using Hypothes.is as a communal reading tool in coursework utilize this outline (or similar ones) in combination with their annotation practices.

      Curating one's annotations and placing them into a commonplace book or zettelkasten would be a fantastic rhetorical exercise to extend the value of one's notes and ideas.

  4. Mar 2021
    1. A summary/paraphrase of specific parts of the article you found interesting Definitions of terms used in the article (with links)References to people/places/things mentioned in the article (with links or images/videos)Opinions (respectfully, with evidence)Questions Links to related materials or further evidence on the same subject 

      This is a great list of some common types of annotations for students just starting out, but it misses one key annotation that I think is the goal of all annotations:

      New ideas from the reader that have been sparked by the writing.

      Incidentally, this is also one of the more difficult types to create and it's also harder to model to students.

      In some sense, many of these annotation types fall relatively neatly into Bloom's taxonomy with my addendum falling under the top level of the pyramid usually labeled "create".

  5. Feb 2021
  6. Oct 2020
    1. After all, Harry Potter wouldn’t have completed his Potions course were it not for an annotated version of the Advanced Potion-Making textbook.

      One also has to question for pedagogy’s sake why the new professor of the course continued the adoption of that text which was patently “off” in its recipes to the point that a student who had the corrections and better descriptions (via those annotations) excelled while others were only passable?

  7. Feb 2017
    1. required guidelines

      FORCING us to keep track of our annotations is OPPRESSIVE and SILENCES our organic voice and STIFLES creative thinking.

  8. Dec 2016
  9. Dec 2015