61 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. When gold was discovered in the Yukon, 100,000 people desperately tried to make it to a small patch of land in one of the most remote environments on the continent. Few made it all the way. The Klondike Gold Rush was many things: a media conspiracy, a ponzi scheme, a land grab. But above all, it was a humanitarian disaster that stretched over much of the Pacific Northwest.

      “The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of the Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.”

      “That land was stolen by the Canadian state and that gold was whisked away by private interests. The Federal Government only signed land claims with Indigenous peoples in the Yukon in the 1990s, but by that point, almost all the gold had been mined out of the ground.”

      “The Klondike gold rush was a rolling disaster that captured tens of thousands of people. When the first European explorers came to the Americas, they came here looking for gold. In the 1890s, that lust for precious metals eventually led men to the farthest reaches of this continent.”

      “Today, instead of 100,000 people descending on a small patch of land, you have large corporations digging treasures out of the ground. But the legacies these mining operations leave behind are just like what happened in the Klondike: workers with broken bodies, environmental destruction, the dispossession of Indigenous land, sexual violence. The gold rushes never stopped. They just morphed into something different.”

      Canada is Fake

      “Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.”

    1. This pattern lies at the heart of the shell corporation we call “Canada,” and forms the logic of both domestic and international policy. The mining industry is the most egregious example. Over 75 percent of the world’s mining companies are based in Canada.

      Canada is Fake

      Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.

      Extraction Empire

    2. Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.

      Extraction Empire

      Globally, more than 75% of prospecting and mining companies on the planet are based in Canada. Seemingly impossible to conceive, the scale of these statistics naturally extends the logic of Canada’s historical legacy as state, nation, and now, as global resource empire.

      Canada’s Indian Reserve System served, officially, as a strategy of Indigenous apartheid (preceding South African apartheid) and unofficially, as a policy of Indigenous genocide (preceding the Nazi concentration camps of World War II).

    1. “Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.”

      Canada is fake

      “Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.”

      https://twitter.com/bauhouse/status/1449737672407150595

      “Eventually they spread their land grab all the way to the Pacific Ocean and the northern coastlines in pursuit of gold, silver, iron, copper, nickel, and diamond reserves.… ‘Canada’ came about in the late 1800s for nakedly economic reasons…”

    1. accountability, reparations, and radical social change

      The mechanisms of our compliance with the dominant system are designed into the system:

      • Social: learned helplessness (individuality)
      • Economic: trained incapacities (specialization)
      • Political: bureaucratic intransigence (authoritarianism)
  2. Oct 2021
    1. Neurons, synapses, electrochemical receptors, and a compromised immune system.

      I use the metaphor of a compromised immune system to describe the effects of propaganda, the polluted information ecology in which we are swimming.

      Ultimately, the cognitive distortions are the disease of modern life, where we can no longer understand ourselves or our world, because the disinformation campaigns have impaired our ability to think rationally when we are in a constant state of stress, anxiety, and fear. We become stuck in the lizard brain, the limbic system, where we make emotional decisions and subsequently justify our actions with rationalizations.

  3. Sep 2021
    1. Milestone

      Where are the actual emissions reductions milestones? Why doesn't this page show the total emissions of the signatories at the time of signing, the targets, and the emissions reduced since signing? How is this pledge different from all the other climate pledges?

    1. Yes, signatories are held accountable through their choice of regular, publicly-available reporting, and the public-facing commitments they make when signing The Climate Pledge.

      Who is checking this? Will signatories who fail to meet their climate commitments be removed from the signatory list? Are there any repercussions?

  4. Jul 2021
    1. To the extentthat people accommodate themselves to the faceless inflexibility ofplatforms, they will become less and less capable of seeing thevirtues of institutions, on any scale. One consequence of thataccommodation will be an increasing impatience withrepresentative democracy, and an accompanying desire to replacepolitical institutions with platform-based decision making:referendums and plebiscites, conducted at as high a level as possible(national, or in the case of the European Union, transnational).Among other things, these trends will bring, in turn, theexploitation of communities and natural resources by people whowill never see or know anything about what they are exploiting. !escope of local action will therefore be diminished, and will comeunder increasing threat of what we might call, borrowing a phrasefrom Einstein, spooky action at a distance.

      This fits in line with my thesis to make corporations and especially corporate executives and owners be local, so that they can see the effect that their decisions are having.

  5. May 2021
  6. Apr 2021
    1. The privacy policy — unlocking the door to your profile information, geodata, camera, and in some cases emails — is so disturbing that it has set off alarms even in the tech world.

      This Intercept article covers some of the specific privacy policy concerns Barron hints at here. The discussion of one of the core patents underlying the game, which is described as a “System and Method for Transporting Virtual Objects in a Parallel Reality Game" is particularly interesting. Essentially, this system generates revenue for the company (in this case Niantic and Google) through the gamified collection of data on the real world - that selfie you took with squirtle is starting to feel a little bit less innocent in retrospect...

  7. Feb 2021
    1. AbstractMany organizations are drowning in a flood of corporate bullshit, andthis is particularly true of organizations in trouble, whose managers tend to makeup stuff on the fly and with little regard for future consequences. Bullshittingand lying are not synonymous. While the liar knows the truth and wittingly bendsit to suit their purpose, the bullshitter simply does not care about the truth. Man-agers can actually do something about organizational bullshit, and this ExecutiveDigest provides a sequential framework that enables them to do so. They cancomprehend it, they can recognize it for what it is, they can act against it, and theycan take steps to prevent it from happening in the future. While it is unlikely thatany organization will ever be able to rid itself of bullshit entirely, this article arguesthat by taking these steps, astute managers can work toward stemming its flood
    1. Workplaces are awash with many forms of bullshit that manifest in manydifferent ways, including misrepresentation, where leaders make statementswithout knowing the facts; meaningless job titles (Graeber, 2018); fake andshallow company slogans (e.g. Lee et al., 2020); and workplace puffery suchas resume padding (Grover, 2005). Under some circumstances, organizationalbullshit, usually referred to as “banter”, “badinage” or “joshing” can be harm-less, often creative, and even contribute to a congenial atmosphere in an orga-nization. Organizational bullshit may even have a positive effect when leadersarticulate inspiring futuristic, but largely uncertain visions, that are meant toinspire others to act (Christensen et al., 2019). On the other hand, other scholarshave outlined a number of detrimental effects of bullshit. McCarthy et al.(2020), while acknowledging there can be positive effects of organizational bull-shit, also caution that it can result in lower job satisfaction among the organ-ization’s members, increased distrust in leadership, a reduction in productivity,and ultimately a negative impact on overall performance (McCarthy et al.,2020)
  8. Nov 2020
    1. But as long as the most important measure of success is short-term profit, doing things that help strengthen communities will fall by the wayside. Surveillance, which allows individually targeted advertising, will be prioritized over user privacy. Outrage, which drives engagement, will be prioritized over feelings of belonging. And corporate secrecy, which allows Facebook to evade both regulators and its users, will be prioritized over societal oversight.

      Schneier is saying here that as long as the incentives are still pointing in the direction of short-term profit, privacy will be neglected.

      Surveillance, which allows for targeted advertising will win out over user privacy. Outrage, will be prioritized over more wholesome feelings. Corporate secrecy will allow Facebook to evade regulators and its users.

  9. Oct 2020
    1. How To Make Online Corporate Learning Fun During Lockdown

      (Available in text or audio.) This article provides basic principles (agenda, duration) and technologies (gamification, discussion boards) and activities to keep employees engaged in online learning. While this provides strategy, it does not provide implementation guidance within the corporate environment. (2/10)

    1. 10 Active Learning Methods for Super Engaged Corporate Learners

      This article reviews the concept of active learning and its need in today's workplace training. Ten strategies to promote active learning via technology are discussed (collaborative virtual classrooms, mind mapping, brainstorming, scavenger hunts, role play/simulation, problem-based learning, discussion boards, teach back, jigsaw technique, flipped classroom, game based learning). This is a good resource for active learning strategies. (5/10)

  10. Sep 2020
  11. Aug 2020
    1. LMSs are more typically utilized in corporate settings with many available systems on the market, including NetDimensions EKP, Saba and SumTotal Systems (Carliner, 2005), as well as Lotus, Oracle iLearning and Cornerstone OnDemand, among others (Learning Circuits, 2005). A 2006 survey highlights the features most common-ly found in the corporate LMSs currently being utilized (2006 Survey of Learning Management Systems, 2006).

      Description of the corporate LMS market.

  12. Jul 2020
  13. Jun 2020
    1. Oh, and to be absolutely clear, every example that I know of a company trying to adopt the "pioneer - settler - town planner" structure without first getting their principles in a decent state has ... failed. Principles first. Org structure later. Culture, later still.

      Thinking on this with respect to Colin Woodard's book American Nations, makes me realize why America is in such horrible shape today.

  14. Apr 2020
  15. Nov 2019
  16. Oct 2019
  17. Mar 2019
    1. 7 Gamification Strategies for Corporate Training

      This article by the Tech Edvocate discusses seven ways to gamify corporate training. I find this personally important because I often use games to teach my adult learners about some of the most boring topics. (For instance, I'm currently creating training to explain the theory and calculations behind a very complex distribution management software tool. Imagine explaining how a calculator works to provide correct answers to math equations, then multiply that a few times. It's tough.) According to this article, in order to gamify, instructors can specify learning objectives, use reward systems, incorporate social interaction, and challenge learners to make gamified learning successful. 8/10

  18. Nov 2017
    1. institutional demands for enterprise services such as e-mail, student information systems, and the branded website become mission-critical

      In context, these other dimensions of “online presence” in Higher Education take a special meaning. Reminds me of WPcampus. One might have thought that it was about using WordPress to enhance learning. While there are some presentations on leveraging WP as a kind of “Learning Management System”, much of it is about Higher Education as a sector for webwork (-development, -design, etc.).

  19. Sep 2017
      1. Talking about these lands as depopulated — size comparisons downplay population
      2. Uplifting Disney music. Contrasting the old with the "modern" new 3. Rural natives — "Cling to their primitive ways" within the "confines of their small world"
      3. Audience: Americans, middle-class men 5. Primary consumers of videos like this: middle-class, business-men in the United States. Looking to invest in businesses in Central America. Sex tourism is also huge.
      4. Gender — Showing a lot of women, exotic. Don't see men represented because your audience is male.
  20. Jul 2017
  21. Jun 2017
    1. Similarly, it is true and useful to understand these changes in acquisition policy within the context of both internal and external industrial/institutional developments.

      Yes, how much influence did Exxon Mobil Corporation exert on the choice of programming viewed on Masterpiece Theatre?

  22. Sep 2016
    1. Finally, in order for data-driven interventions to be wide-spread, institutions must sustain a culture that embraces the use of data, and create incentives for data-driven activities amongst administrators, instructors and student support staff. Large-scale, data-driven policy changes are implemented with minimal friction and maximal buy-in when leaders demonstrate a commitment to data-informed decision-making, and create multiple opportunities for stakeholders to make sense of and contribute to the direction of the change. Users not only need to be trained on the proper ways to use these tools and communicate with students, they also require meaningful incentives to take on the potentially steep learning curve.[40]

      Thankfully, this paragraph isn’t framed as a need for (top-down) “culture change”, as is often the case in similar discussions. Supporting a culture is a radically different thing from forcing a change. To my mind, it’s way more likely to succeed (and, clearly, it’s much more empowering). But “decision-makers” may also interpret active support as weaker than the kind of implementation they know. It’s probably a case where a “Chief Culture Officer” can have a key role, in helping others expand their understanding of how culture works. Step 1 is acknowledging that culture change isn’t like a stepwise program.

  23. Jul 2016
    1. Google’s chief culture officer

      Her name is Stacy Savides Sullivan. She was already Google’s HR director by the time the CCO title was added to her position, in 2006. Somewhat surprising that Sullivan’d disagree with Teller, given her alleged role:

      Part of her job is to protect key parts of Google’s scrappy, open-source cultural core as the company has evolved into a massive multinational.

      And her own description:

      "I work with employees around the world to figure out ways to maintain and enhance and develop our culture and how to keep the core values we had in the very beginning–a flat organization, a lack of hierarchy, a collaborative environment–to keep these as we continue to grow and spread them and filtrate them into our new offices around the world.

      Though “failure bonuses” may sound a bit far-fetched in the abstract, they do fit with most everything else we know about Googloids’ “corporate culture” (and the Silicon Valley Ideology (aka Silicon Valley Narrative), more generally).

    1. Tyton’s Bryant sees LinkedIn, Lynda and Microsoft tapping into continuing and lifelong learning, an arena in which he thinks higher-ed institutions have done poorly.
    2. much more tied to employment

      Cue Thorstein.

    3. “In my perfect world, I have a competency profile — you know, on LinkedIn, presumably — that is kept up to date in real time on the competencies that I am exhibiting in my work, as well as competencies that I’ve demonstrated through assessments, through my education, the formal credentials that I’ve accrued,”

      It’s a very specific dream, but it sounds like it’s shared by a lot of people.

    4. “unstructured informal just-in-time learning.”
    5. traditional certification market
    6. currently fragmented corporate-training market

      There’s typically a big gap between “education” and corporate training. Sounds like the deal is more about the latter than the former.

  24. Jun 2016
    1. Businesses are not saying "I want someone who went through a programme that promised them a job".

      In the Ivory Tower, we hear less about that part of the relationship between Higher Ed. and businesses. Those colleagues of ours who are so against the 100-year push for universities to become more vocational tend to assume that employers are the ones doing the pushing. While it’s quite possible that some managers wish for universities to produce optimised employees, many people on that side of the equation argue that they’re quite able to train employees, as long as they’re able to learn. Now, there’s a whole thing about the “talent pipeline” which might get faculty in a tizzy. But it’s not about moulding learners into employees. Like much of Higher Ed., it’s about identifying (and labeling) people who conform to a certain set of standards. Not less problematic, perhaps, but not so much of a distinction between academia and employability.

  25. Mar 2016
  26. Jan 2016
    1. Apps like Instagram are blind, or almost blind. Their gaze goes inwards, reluctant to transfer any of their vast powers to others, leading them into quiet deaths.

      There might be a better term than 'blind' for this. It seems like the content itself, and the users using it, are the things that are blinded. To be blind is to be disabled -- and Instagram and other corporate services are far from that.

      These corporate platforms are like walled gardens, or cult leaders, creating propaganda and structures that blind and bind behind closed doors. They are the oppressor, the users the oppressed. And all at the demise of the health of the Internet. By blocking external hyperlinks, they are actually committing a crime against the rest of the Internet, cutting off the very thing that makes the Internet powerful. Let's start calling it what it truly is, an externality, a cost on people who did not choose incur that cost.

  27. Dec 2015
    1. Australian Tax Office transparency report.

      The data contains the total income, taxable income and tax payable of more than 1,500 public and foreign private entities for the 2013-14 income year. The companies each have a total income of $100 million or more. Cells containing a dash (-) represent "an amount of zero or less". The report only contains individual companies, not groups of companies.

  28. Sep 2015
    1. Another destructive Stress Reaction is withdrawal. We become uninvolved, aloof, occupied with other things. We hide in our offices. We avoid communicating.
    1. I knew if I took that pill I’d be much too stressed about the possible side effects to ever fall asleep. I realized this was no joke — it was a real ad. And I realized this is exactly how corporate trainings talk about stress at work.

      Reminds me of The I.T. Crowd - Do You Fell Stressed; I think there are similar gems throughout the episode.

  29. Aug 2015