23 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. 7 Gamification Strategies for Corporate Training

      This article by the Tech Edvocate discusses seven ways to gamify corporate training. I find this personally important because I often use games to teach my adult learners about some of the most boring topics. (For instance, I'm currently creating training to explain the theory and calculations behind a very complex distribution management software tool. Imagine explaining how a calculator works to provide correct answers to math equations, then multiply that a few times. It's tough.) According to this article, in order to gamify, instructors can specify learning objectives, use reward systems, incorporate social interaction, and challenge learners to make gamified learning successful. 8/10

  2. Nov 2017
    1. institutional demands for enterprise services such as e-mail, student information systems, and the branded website become mission-critical

      In context, these other dimensions of “online presence” in Higher Education take a special meaning. Reminds me of WPcampus. One might have thought that it was about using WordPress to enhance learning. While there are some presentations on leveraging WP as a kind of “Learning Management System”, much of it is about Higher Education as a sector for webwork (-development, -design, etc.).

  3. Sep 2017
      1. Talking about these lands as depopulated — size comparisons downplay population
      2. Uplifting Disney music. Contrasting the old with the "modern" new 3. Rural natives — "Cling to their primitive ways" within the "confines of their small world"
      3. Audience: Americans, middle-class men 5. Primary consumers of videos like this: middle-class, business-men in the United States. Looking to invest in businesses in Central America. Sex tourism is also huge.
      4. Gender — Showing a lot of women, exotic. Don't see men represented because your audience is male.
  4. Jul 2017
  5. Jun 2017
    1. Similarly, it is true and useful to understand these changes in acquisition policy within the context of both internal and external industrial/institutional developments.

      Yes, how much influence did Exxon Mobil Corporation exert on the choice of programming viewed on Masterpiece Theatre?

  6. Sep 2016
    1. Finally, in order for data-driven interventions to be wide-spread, institutions must sustain a culture that embraces the use of data, and create incentives for data-driven activities amongst administrators, instructors and student support staff. Large-scale, data-driven policy changes are implemented with minimal friction and maximal buy-in when leaders demonstrate a commitment to data-informed decision-making, and create multiple opportunities for stakeholders to make sense of and contribute to the direction of the change. Users not only need to be trained on the proper ways to use these tools and communicate with students, they also require meaningful incentives to take on the potentially steep learning curve.[40]

      Thankfully, this paragraph isn’t framed as a need for (top-down) “culture change”, as is often the case in similar discussions. Supporting a culture is a radically different thing from forcing a change. To my mind, it’s way more likely to succeed (and, clearly, it’s much more empowering). But “decision-makers” may also interpret active support as weaker than the kind of implementation they know. It’s probably a case where a “Chief Culture Officer” can have a key role, in helping others expand their understanding of how culture works. Step 1 is acknowledging that culture change isn’t like a stepwise program.

  7. Jul 2016
    1. Google’s chief culture officer

      Her name is Stacy Savides Sullivan. She was already Google’s HR director by the time the CCO title was added to her position, in 2006. Somewhat surprising that Sullivan’d disagree with Teller, given her alleged role:

      Part of her job is to protect key parts of Google’s scrappy, open-source cultural core as the company has evolved into a massive multinational.

      And her own description:

      "I work with employees around the world to figure out ways to maintain and enhance and develop our culture and how to keep the core values we had in the very beginning–a flat organization, a lack of hierarchy, a collaborative environment–to keep these as we continue to grow and spread them and filtrate them into our new offices around the world.

      Though “failure bonuses” may sound a bit far-fetched in the abstract, they do fit with most everything else we know about Googloids’ “corporate culture” (and the Silicon Valley Ideology (aka Silicon Valley Narrative), more generally).

    1. Tyton’s Bryant sees LinkedIn, Lynda and Microsoft tapping into continuing and lifelong learning, an arena in which he thinks higher-ed institutions have done poorly.
    2. much more tied to employment

      Cue Thorstein.

    3. “In my perfect world, I have a competency profile — you know, on LinkedIn, presumably — that is kept up to date in real time on the competencies that I am exhibiting in my work, as well as competencies that I’ve demonstrated through assessments, through my education, the formal credentials that I’ve accrued,”

      It’s a very specific dream, but it sounds like it’s shared by a lot of people.

    4. “unstructured informal just-in-time learning.”
    5. traditional certification market
    6. currently fragmented corporate-training market

      There’s typically a big gap between “education” and corporate training. Sounds like the deal is more about the latter than the former.

  8. Jun 2016
    1. Businesses are not saying "I want someone who went through a programme that promised them a job".

      In the Ivory Tower, we hear less about that part of the relationship between Higher Ed. and businesses. Those colleagues of ours who are so against the 100-year push for universities to become more vocational tend to assume that employers are the ones doing the pushing. While it’s quite possible that some managers wish for universities to produce optimised employees, many people on that side of the equation argue that they’re quite able to train employees, as long as they’re able to learn. Now, there’s a whole thing about the “talent pipeline” which might get faculty in a tizzy. But it’s not about moulding learners into employees. Like much of Higher Ed., it’s about identifying (and labeling) people who conform to a certain set of standards. Not less problematic, perhaps, but not so much of a distinction between academia and employability.

  9. Mar 2016
  10. Jan 2016
    1. Apps like Instagram are blind, or almost blind. Their gaze goes inwards, reluctant to transfer any of their vast powers to others, leading them into quiet deaths.

      There might be a better term than 'blind' for this. It seems like the content itself, and the users using it, are the things that are blinded. To be blind is to be disabled -- and Instagram and other corporate services are far from that.

      These corporate platforms are like walled gardens, or cult leaders, creating propaganda and structures that blind and bind behind closed doors. They are the oppressor, the users the oppressed. And all at the demise of the health of the Internet. By blocking external hyperlinks, they are actually committing a crime against the rest of the Internet, cutting off the very thing that makes the Internet powerful. Let's start calling it what it truly is, an externality, a cost on people who did not choose incur that cost.

  11. Dec 2015
    1. Australian Tax Office transparency report.

      The data contains the total income, taxable income and tax payable of more than 1,500 public and foreign private entities for the 2013-14 income year. The companies each have a total income of $100 million or more. Cells containing a dash (-) represent "an amount of zero or less". The report only contains individual companies, not groups of companies.

  12. Sep 2015
    1. Another destructive Stress Reaction is withdrawal. We become uninvolved, aloof, occupied with other things. We hide in our offices. We avoid communicating.
    1. I knew if I took that pill I’d be much too stressed about the possible side effects to ever fall asleep. I realized this was no joke — it was a real ad. And I realized this is exactly how corporate trainings talk about stress at work.

      Reminds me of The I.T. Crowd - Do You Fell Stressed; I think there are similar gems throughout the episode.

  13. Aug 2015