172 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
  2. Jul 2022
  3. Jun 2022
    1. We are the leading independent Open Access publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences in the UK: a not-for-profit Social Enterprise run by scholars who are committed to making high-quality research freely available to readers around the world. All our books are available to read online and download for free, with no Book Processing Charges (BPCs) for authors. We publish monographs and textbooks in all areas, offering the academic excellence of a traditional press combined with the speed, convenience and accessibility of digital publishing. We also publish bespoke Series for Universities and Research Centers and invite libraries to support Open Access publishing by joining our Membership Programme.
    1. The absence of Quick Note on the iPhone is a strange, glaring omission that’s baffling to me. I do research on every device, including the iPhone. In fact, I’d argue that the iPhone is the most important place to include Quick Note. That’s because, despite the ample screen of my iPhone 12 Pro Max, it’s still not the best place to read, making saving items for later with Quick Note more valuable there. However, my iPhone is still where I run across links and other material I want to save daily. I’d love to be able to drop links and blockquotes into Quick Note from my iPhone, so I could revisit the material later from the more comfortable reading environment of my iPad or Mac. Not having Quick Note on the iPhone is a significant blow to the feature’s utility.

      Considering how I've been publicly speaking and behaving (melodramatically, that is) - as someone who has returned to using my iPhone as my primary working device - this sort of oversight is precisely what I expected, actually, What I did not expect of Apple was to respond as early as the next numeric release to this omission.

      Running this very first build of iOS 16, I can indeed that Apple has thought of at least one original context for Quick Note creation, but obviously, it's quite hard to say at this point.

      Anywho/how, here's what it looks like at the moment.

      Quick Note implemented on iPhone as of iOS 16's very first available dev beta

  4. May 2022
    1. .Adopting the habit of knowledge capture has immediate benefitsfor our mental health and peace of mind. We can let go of the fearthat our memory will fail us at a crucial moment. Instead of jumpingat every new headline and notification, we can choose to consumeinformation that adds value to our lives and consciously let go of therest.

      Immediate knowledge capture by highlighting, annotating, or other means when taking notes can help to decrease cognitive load. This is similar to other productivity methods like quick logging within a bullet journal system, writing morning pages, or Getting Things Done (GTD). By putting everything down in one place, you can free your mind of the constant need to remember dozens of things. This frees up your working memory to decrease stress as you know you've captured the basic idea for future filtering, sorting, and work at a later date.

  5. Mar 2022
  6. Jan 2022
    1. Samuel Hartlib was well aware of this improvement. While extolling the clever invention of Harrison, Hartlib noted that combinations and links con-stituted the ‘argumentative part’ of the card index.60

      Hartlib Papers 30/4/47A, Ephemerides 1640, Part 2.

      In extolling the Ark of Studies created by Thomas Harrison, Samuel Hartlib indicated that the combinations of information and the potential links between them created the "argumentative part" of the system. In some sense this seems to be analogous to the the processing power of an information system if not specifically creating its consciousness.

    1. Fernandez-Castaneda, A., Lu, P., Geraghty, A. C., Song, E., Lee, M.-H., Wood, J., Yalcin, B., Taylor, K. R., Dutton, S., Acosta-Alvarez, L., Ni, L., Contreras-Esquivel, D., Gehlhausen, J. R., Klein, J., Lucas, C., Mao, T., Silva, J., Pena-Hernandez, M., Tabachnikova, A., … Monje, M. (2022). Mild respiratory SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause multi-lineage cellular dysregulation and myelin loss in the brain (p. 2022.01.07.475453). https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.01.07.475453

    1. Most developers are familiar with MySQL and PostgreSQL. They are great RDBMS and can be used to run analytical queries with some limitations. It’s just that most relational databases are not really designed to run queries on tens of millions of rows. However, there are databases specially optimized for this scenario - column-oriented DBMS. One good example is of such a database is ClickHouse.

      How to use Relational Databases to process logs

    2. Another format you may encounter is structured logs in JSON format. This format is simple to read by humans and machines. It also can be parsed by most programming languages
  7. Dec 2021
    1. Catala, a programming language developed by Protzenko's graduate student Denis Merigoux, who is working at the National Institute for Research in Digital Science and Technology (INRIA) in Paris, France. It is not often lawyers and programmers find themselves working together, but Catala was designed to capture and execute legal algorithms and to be understood by lawyers and programmers alike in a language "that lets you follow the very specific legal train of thought," Protzenko says.

      A domain-specific language for encoding legal interpretations.

    1. One more thing ought to be explained in advance: why the card index is indeed a paper machine. As we will see, card indexes not only possess all the basic logical elements of the universal discrete machine — they also fi t a strict understanding of theoretical kinematics . The possibility of rear-ranging its elements makes the card index a machine: if changing the position of a slip of paper and subsequently introducing it in another place means shifting other index cards, this process can be described as a chained mechanism. This “ starts moving when force is exerted on one of its movable parts, thus changing its position. What follows is mechanical work taking place under particular conditions. This is what we call a machine . ” 11 The force taking effect is the user ’ s hand. A book lacks this property of free motion, and owing to its rigid form it is not a paper machine.

      The mechanical work of moving an index card from one position to another (and potentially changing or modifying links to it in the process) allows us to call card catalogues paper machines. This property is not shared by information stored in codices or scrolls and thus we do not call books paper machines.

  8. Nov 2021
    1. I spend most of my day in iOS Notes app.

      Did I ever really find this man intelligent??? Things sincerely do make a lot more sense now. Such a specific lack of aspiration.

  9. Oct 2021
  10. Sep 2021
  11. Jul 2021
    1. whereas now, they know that user@domain.com was subscribed to xyz.net at some point and is unsubscribing. Information is gold. Replace user@domain with abcd@senate and xyz.net with warezxxx.net and you've got tabloid gold.
  12. Jun 2021
    1. Different ways to prepend a line: (echo 'line to prepend';cat file)|sponge file sed -i '1iline to prepend' file # GNU sed -i '' $'1i\\\nline to prepend\n' file # BSD printf %s\\n 0a 'line to prepend' . w|ed -s file perl -pi -e 'print"line to prepend\n"if$.==1' file
  13. May 2021
  14. Apr 2021
    1. This post articulates a lot of what I've been thinking about for the past 18 months or so, but it adds the additional concept of community integration.

      Interestingly, this aligns with the early, tentative ideas around what the future of In Beta might look like as a learning community, rather than a repository of content.

  15. Mar 2021
  16. Jan 2021
    1. Process models, on the other hand, provide specification ofinternal structure, mechanism, and information flow

      predictive processing is a process model that is suggested (or constrained) by the FEP.

  17. Nov 2020
  18. Oct 2020
  19. Sep 2020
  20. Aug 2020
  21. Jul 2020
    1. As mentioned earlier in these guidelines, it is very important that controllers assess the purposes forwhich data is actually processed and the lawful grounds on which it is based prior to collecting thedata. Often companies need personal data for several purposes, and the processing is based on morethan one lawful basis, e.g. customer data may be based on contract and consent. Hence, a withdrawalof consent does not mean a controller must erase data that are processed for a purpose that is basedon the performance of the contract with the data subject. Controllers should therefore be clear fromthe outset about which purpose applies to each element of data and which lawful basis is being reliedupon.
    2. If there is no other lawful basisjustifying the processing (e.g. further storage) of the data, they should be deleted by the controller.
    3. In cases where the data subject withdraws his/her consent and the controller wishes to continue toprocess the personal data on another lawful basis, they cannot silently migrate from consent (which iswithdrawn) to this other lawful basis. Any change in the lawful basis for processing must be notified toa data subject in accordance with the information requirements in Articles 13 and 14 and under thegeneral principle of transparency.
    1. Some vendors may relay on legitimate interest instead of consent for the processing of personal data. The User Interface specifies if a specific vendor is relating on legitimate interest as legal basis, meaning that that vendor will process user’s data for the declared purposes without asking for their consent. The presence of vendors relying on legitimate interest is the reason why within the user interface, even if a user has switched on one specific purpose, not all vendors processing data for that purpose will be displayed as switched on. In fact, those vendors processing data for that specific purpose, relying only on legitimate interest will be displayed as switched off.
    2. Under GDPR there are six possible legal bases for the processing of personal data.
  22. Jun 2020
  23. May 2020
    1. learn how to be a data steward or data ally. Help organizations proactively think about what data they collect and how it is governed after its collected. Help organizations get their collective head around all the data they possess, how they curate it, how they back it up, and how over time they minimize it.
    1. Services generally fall into two categories: Services related to your own data collection activities (eg. contact forms)Services related to third-party data collection activities (eg. Google Analytics)
    1. Sure, anti-spam measures such as a CAPTCHA would certainly fall under "legitimate interests". But would targeting cookies? The gotcha with reCAPTCHA is that this legitimate-interest, quite-necessary-in-today's-world feature is inextricably bundled with unwanted and unrelated Google targeting (cookiepedia.co.uk/cookies/NID) cookies (_ga, _gid for v2; NID for v3).
    1. Because consent under the GDPR is such an important issue, it’s mandatory that you keep clear records and that you’re able to demonstrate that the user has given consent; should problems arise, the burden of proof lies with the data controller, so keeping accurate records is vital.
    2. The records should include: who provided the consent;when and how consent was acquired from the individual user;the consent collection form they were presented with at the time of the collection;which conditions and legal documents were applicable at the time that the consent was acquired.
    3. Non-compliant Record Keeping Compliant Record Keeping
    1. there’s no need to send consent request emails — provided that this basis of processing was stated in your privacy policy and that users had easy access to the notice prior to you processing their data. If this information was not available to users at the time, but one of these legal bases can currently legitimately apply to your situation, then your best bet would be to ensure that your current privacy notice meets requirements, so that you can continue to process your user data in a legally compliant way.
    2. Here’s why sending GDPR consent emails is tricky and should be handled very carefully.
    1. they sought to eliminate data controllers and processors acting without appropriate permission, leaving citizens with no control as their personal data was transferred to third parties and beyond
    1. Consent receipt mechanisms can be especially helpful in automatically generating such records.
    2. With that guidance in mind, and from a practical standpoint, consider keeping records of the following: The name or other identifier of the data subject that consented; The dated document, a timestamp, or note of when an oral consent was made; The version of the consent request and privacy policy existing at the time of the consent; and, The document or data capture form by which the data subject submitted his or her data.
    3. Where a processing activity is necessary for the performance of a contract.

      Would a terms of service agreement be considered a contract in this case? So can you just make your terms of service basically include consent or implied consent?

    4. “Is consent really the most appropriate legal basis for this processing activity?” It should be taken into account that consent may not be the best choice in the following situations:
    1. “Until CR 1.0 there was no effective privacy standard or requirement for recording consent in a common format and providing people with a receipt they can reuse for data rights.  Individuals could not track their consents or monitor how their information was processed or know who to hold accountable in the event of a breach of their privacy,” said Colin Wallis, executive director, Kantara Initiative.  “CR 1.0 changes the game.  A consent receipt promises to put the power back into the hands of the individual and, together with its supporting API — the consent receipt generator — is an innovative mechanism for businesses to comply with upcoming GDPR requirements.  For the first time individuals and organizations will be able to maintain and manage permissions for personal data.”
    2. CR 1.0 is an essential specification for meeting the proof of consent requirements of GDPR to enable international transfer of personal information in a number of applications.
    3. Its purpose is to decrease the reliance on privacy policies and enhance the ability for people to share and control personal information.
    1. It’s useful to remember that under GDPR regulations consent is not the ONLY reason that an organization can process user data; it is only one of the “Lawful Bases”, therefore companies can apply other lawful (within the scope of GDPR) bases for data processing activity. However, there will always be data processing activities where consent is the only or best option.
    2. Under EU law (specifically the GDPR) you must keep and maintain “full and extensive” up-to-date records of your business processing activities, both internal and external, where the processing is carried out on personal data.
    3. However, even if your processing activities somehow fall outside of these situations, your information duties to users make it necessary for you to keep basic records relating to which data you collect, its purpose, all parties involved in its processing and the data retention period — this is mandatory for everyone.
    1. If you’re a controller based outside of the EU, you’re transferring personal data outside of the EU each time you collect data of users based within the EU. Please make sure you do so according to one of the legal bases for transfer.

      Here they equate collection of personal data with transfer of personal data. But this is not very intuitive: I usually think of collection of data and transfer of data as rather different activities. It would be if we collected the data on a server in EU and then transferred all that data (via some internal process) to a server in US.

      But I guess when you collect the data over the Internet from a user in a different country, the data is technically being transferred directly to your server in the US. But who is doing the transfer? I would argue that it is not me who is transferring it; it is the user who transmitted/sent the data to my app. I'm collecting it from them, but not transferring it. Collecting seems like more of a passive activity, while transfer seems like a more active activity (maybe not if it's all automated).

      So if these terms are equivalent, then they should replace all instances of "transfer" with "collect". That would make it much clearer and harder to mistakenly assume this doesn't apply to oneself. Or if there is a nuanced difference between the two activities, then the differences should be explained, such as examples of when collection may occur without transfer occurring.

    2. If you profile your users, you have to tell them. Therefore, you must pick the relevant clause from the privacy policy generator.
    3. If you’re selling products and keep record of users’ choices for marketing purposes, dividing them into meaningful categories, such as by age, gender, geographical origin etc., you’re profiling them.
    1. you can think “sold” here as “shared with third parties for any profit, monetary or otherwise”
    2. under most legislations you’re required to inform extensively about the processing activities, their purposes and the rights of users.
    3. Full and extensive records of processing are expressly required in cases where your data processing activities are not occasional, where they could result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of others, where they involve the handling of “special categories of data” or where your organization has more than 250 employees — this effectively covers almost all data controllers and processors.
    1. If you have fewer than 250 employees, you only need to document processing activities that: are not occasional; or
    2. Most organisations are required to maintain a record of their processing activities, covering areas such as processing purposes, data sharing and retention; we call this documentation.
    1. it buys, receives, sells, or shares the personal information of 50,000 or more consumers annually for the business’ commercial purposes. Since IP addresses fall under what is considered personal data — and “commercial purposes” simply means to advance commercial or economic interests — it is likely that any website with at least 50k unique visits per year from California falls within this scope.
    1. You must disclose how the add-on collects, uses, stores and shares user data in the privacy policy field on AMO. Mozilla expects that the add-on limits data collection whenever possible, in keeping with Mozilla’s Lean Data Practices and Mozilla’s Data Privacy Principles, and uses the data only for the purpose for which it was originally collected.
  24. Apr 2020
    1. If the PIA identifies risks or high risks, based on the specific context and circumstances, the organization will need to request consent.
    2. Privacy impact assessments or data protection impact assessments under the EU GDPR, before the collection of personal data, will have a key role
    3. U.K. Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham clearly states that consent is not the "silver bullet" for GDPR compliance. In many instances, consent will not be the most appropriate ground — for example, when the processing is based on a legal obligation or when the organization has a legitimate interest in processing personal data.
    4. data processing limited to purposes deemed reasonable and appropriate such as commercial interests, individual interests or societal benefits with minimal privacy impact could be exempt from formal consent. The individual will always retain the right to object to the processing of any personal data at any time, subject to legal or contractual restrictions.
    5. organizations may require consent from individuals where the processing of personal data is likely to result in a risk or high risk to the rights and freedoms of individuals or in the case of automated individual decision-making and profiling. Formal consent could as well be justified where the processing requires sharing of personal data with third parties, international data transfers, or where the organization processes special categories of personal data or personal data from minors.
    6. First, organizations must identify the lawful basis for processing prior to the collection of personal data. Under the GDPR, consent is one basis for processing; there are other alternatives. They may be more appropriate options.