244 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Dec 2020
    1. CHOICE:Maximize choice, addressing how privilege, power, and historic relationships impact both perceptions about and ability to act upon choice.COLLABORATION: Honor transparency and self-determination, and seek to minimize the impact of the inherent power differential while maximizing collaboration and sharing responsibility for making meaningful decisions.

      Lot of rich stuff here - "maximize choice" implies that there is a defined bound; it's not mere anarchy. The "power differential" (between student and teacher) is "inherent"; this is not a call for pure equality of status.

  3. Nov 2020
    1. The future increasingly looks like one where companies use very specific apps to solve their jobs to be done. And collaboration is right where we work. And that makes sense, of course. Collaboration *should* be where you work.

      Collaboration, increasingly, happens where we work.

    2. As it becomes more clear what are specific functional jobs to be done, we see more specialized apps closely aligned with solving for that specific loop. And increasingly collaboration is built in natively to them. In fact, for many reasons collaboration being natively built into them may be one of the main driving forces behind the venture interest and success in these spaces.

      As it becomes more clear what the functional job to be done is, we see more specialized apps aligned with solving that specific loop. Collaboration is increasingly built natively into them.

  4. Oct 2020
    1. Received this from a friend, and has been dwelling on every sentence of this, among many other things.

      This is a fascinating take apparently from Collaborative Circles: Friendship Dynamics and Creative Work by Michael P. Farrell

    1. Using wikis for collaborative learning: Assessing collaboration through contribution

      Through a study of freshman students, the author aimed to determine the success of the Wiki for collaboration. Results revealed variances in learner responses and use of the tool. Lack of use was explained by individual barriers (family, social, work) and system barriers (wiki design). The authors conclude that for the Wiki to be an effective, collaborative tool, additional resources must be provided to the learner, and the Wiki must be meaningful in its design to foster that participation. 7/10

    1. Wiki Use that Increases Communication and Collaboration Motivation

      (Click on download full text to read.) Through a cooperative learning assignment, University students responded to a case study that implemented use of a Wiki. Results demonstrate that Wiki is an effective communication and collaboration tool (access, structure, versioning) for all individuals (introvert, extrovert). Recommendations and considerations for use in the learning environment were provided. 6/10

    1. These are just two of many things that come up, and I don’t really have a great answer to these questions. In most cases I’d say it makes sense for these to remain two conceptually distinct projects, except for the big looming issue which is with the open web shrinking it might helpful for these communities to join common cause and solve some of the problems that have plagued both blogging and wiki in their attempt to compete with proprietary platforms.
    1. It isn't rocket science, but as Jon indicates, it's incredibly powerful.

      I use my personal website with several levels of taxonomy for tagging and categorizing a variety of things for later search and research.

      Much like the example of the Public Radio International producer, I've created what I call a "faux-cast" because I tag everything I listen to online and save it to my website including the appropriate <audio> link to the.mp3 file so that anyone who wants to follow the feed of my listens can have a playlist of all the podcast and internet-related audio I'm listening to.

      A visual version of my "listened to" tags can be found at https://boffosocko.com/kind/listen/ with the RSS feed at https://boffosocko.com/kind/listen/feed/

  5. Sep 2020
    1. There is also a need for defining clear accountability and responsibility (i.e. governance) for each activity. For example, the police chief is accountable for the activity “Evacuation of Residential area”, but the police field team is responsible for its execution. There are dependencies between activities illustrated as dotted lines

      This is a great concrete instantiation of jigsaw..."clear accountability and responsibility for each activity. "

    2. ad-hocactivity management system

      Is this a tool that can be incorporated into the PCS, around which the players' (and specific roles) coordinate their activities....?

    1. Increasingly our tools must understand and align with how we collaborate. This was less important when collaboration was logistically difficult and prohibitively costly, but as collaboration becomes easier its importance has risen. People’s work is less siloed—and their tools must reflect this.

      When not much could be improved in the realm of collaboration (because it wasn't yet technologically possible), it wasn't of much importance.

      Now that the technology exists, the importance of collaboration has become paramount. Collaboration is the ultimate measuring stick for any tool used in a team context.

    2. The core insight of Figma is that design is larger than just designers. Design is all of the conversations between designers and PMs about what to build. It is the mocks and prototypes and the feedback on them. It is the handoff of specs and assets to engineers and how easy it is for them to implement them.

      The key insight the Figma team had was that the design process involves a wide range of people, conversations and artefacts within an organization. Figma brings all those into one place.

  6. Aug 2020
    1. Ray, E. L., Wattanachit, N., Niemi, J., Kanji, A. H., House, K., Cramer, E. Y., Bracher, J., Zheng, A., Yamana, T. K., Xiong, X., Woody, S., Wang, Y., Wang, L., Walraven, R. L., Tomar, V., Sherratt, K., Sheldon, D., Reiner, R. C., Prakash, B. A., … Consortium, C.-19 F. H. (2020). Ensemble Forecasts of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S. MedRxiv, 2020.08.19.20177493. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.08.19.20177493

    1. The dream of Slack is that they become the central nervous system for all of a company’s employees and apps. This is the view of a clean *separation* of productivity and collaboration. Have all your apps for productivity and then have a single app for coordinating everyone, with your apps also feeding notifications into this system. In this way, Slack would become a star. With every app revolving around it. Employees would work out of Slack, periodically moving to whichever app they were needed in, before returning to Slack. But productivity *isn’t* separate from collaboration. They are the two parts of the same loop of producing work. And if anything collaboration is in *service* of team productivity.

      The vision of Slack, according to Kwok, was for people to have their productivity in designated apps, and have one central nervous system (Slack) through which they could collaborate. This was based on the assumption that producing and collaborating could be separated.

      Kwok claims that this assumption is wrong. Collaboration and productivity are intertwined, and you might event say that collaboration serves productivity.

    2. And core Dropbox is not a solution to this. People store their documents in it. But they had to use email and other messaging apps to tell their co-workers which document to check out and what they needed help with. Dropbox understands this concern. It’s what’s driven their numerous forays into owning the workflows and communication channels themselves. With Carousel, Mailbox, and their new desktop apps all working to own that. However, there are constraints to owning the workflow when your fundamental atomic unit is documents. And they never quite owned the communication channels.

      Dropbox is not a solution to this problem, even though they've been trying with Carousel, Mailbox and other desktop apps.

      Kwok posits that Dropbox's problem is that when your fundamental atomic unit is a document, you constrain your ability to own the workflow. Besides, Kwok points out, they never owned the communication channels.

    3. Suddenly, the constraint on work became much more about the speed and lossiness of collaboration. Which remained remarkably analog. The friction of getting people your document, much less keeping correct versioning was non-trivial.

      The shift to digital work removed the friction inherent in analog work (e.g. copying things, moving things, constructing things). The new bottleneck to productivity became collaboration – which remained "remarkably analog" according to Kwok (e.g. document version control was non-trivial).

  7. Jul 2020
  8. Jun 2020
    1. Recommandation 15Le Défenseur des droits recommande aux pouvoirs publics de mettre en place des formations communes à l’ensemble des professionnels intervenant auprès des enfants sur les droits de l’enfant, et d’élaborer et diffuser des supports techniques visant à identifier les besoins de l’enfant et à y apporter une réponse adaptée
    1. Akhvlediani, T., Ali, S. M., Angus, D. C., Arabi, Y. M., Ashraf, S., Baillie, J. K., Bakamutumaho, B., Beane, A., Bozza, F., Brett, S. J., Bruzzone, R., Carson, G., Castle, L., Christian, M., Cobb, J. P., Cummings, M. J., D’Ortenzio, E., Jong, M. D. de, Denis, E., … Webb, S. (2020). Global outbreak research: Harmony not hegemony. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30440-0

    1. Collaborative annotation is an effective methodology that increases student participation, expands reading comprehension, and builds critical-thinking skills and community in class. Annotating together makes reading visible, active, and social, enabling students to engage with their texts, teachers, ideas, and each other in deeper, more meaningful ways.

      Love this description!

  9. May 2020
  10. Apr 2020
    1. Salganik, M. J., Lundberg, I., Kindel, A. T., Ahearn, C. E., Al-Ghoneim, K., Almaatouq, A., Altschul, D. M., Brand, J. E., Carnegie, N. B., Compton, R. J., Datta, D., Davidson, T., Filippova, A., Gilroy, C., Goode, B. J., Jahani, E., Kashyap, R., Kirchner, A., McKay, S., … McLanahan, S. (2020). Measuring the predictability of life outcomes with a scientific mass collaboration. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1915006117