52 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Should it acknowledge its politics, its pedagogy, its ethics?

      "Open" in its oldest and most essential usage, describes the turning away or removing of obstacles to permit access. How could an open educational event not do work with its politics and its ethics, then? If an event, knowingly or otherwise evokes access, it must then address questions of pedagogy, politics, and ethics.

  2. Oct 2019
    1. This student-created, student-structured text offers a user-friendly introduction to the world of critical theory—an invaluable resource for theory newbies

      This is such an important consideration for open authorship of textbooks and similar OER. Those just stepping through threshold concepts are perhaps best positioned to write about them in a way that is immediate and at-hand for the novice.

    2. free public student work from the tyranny of perfection

      YES!!

    3. “public” conjures up the idea of a scholarly, potentially judgmental audience, at least for me

      This is something others I've supported with their public-facing projects, both Pressbooks and Domain of One's Own, have shared with me. It's a real concern and having at hand some language for prefaces or introductions that I can share is something I'd like to do.

    4. Against “Product-Based Learning”: Open Texts are Never Finished

      The Open Textbooks and Open Educational Resources pedagogical learning community will be annotating this article together on October 23, 2019 between 3:30 and 5:00 p.m. EST. Please join us if you can.

    1. The emphasis of open pedagogy can't be on how we copyright, license, and share content. That can be one tiny piece, but it's a mostly metaphorical one, and an offshoot of the deeper and more necessary social justice work: seeing students as full humans, as agents, not customers

      I'm reminded of points Robin DeRosa makes. Progressing through a social justice motivation that begins in access to textbooks, but moves beyond toward access to knowledge, and ultimately access to knowledge creation necessarily democratizes learning.

    2. Textbooks, OER, and the Need for Open Pedagogy

      The Open Textbooks and Open Educational Resources pedagogical learning community will be annotating this article together on October 23, 2019 between 3:30 and 5:00 p.m. EST. Please join us if you can.

  3. Sep 2019
    1. On 21 June, Mr. Giuliani tweeted
    2. On 13 June, the President told ABC's George Stephanopoulos that he would accept damaging information on his political rivals from a foreign government.
    3. interview with The New York Times
    4. 23 April
    5. IO May
    6. On the afternoon of l O May, the President stated in an interview with Politico
    7. On 9 May, The New York Times reported that Mr. Giuliani planned to travel to Ukraine to press the Ukrainian government to pursue investigations that would help the President in his 2020 reelection bid
    8. Other senior Ukrainian officials also contested his original allegations; one former senior Ukrainian prosecutor told Bloomberg on 7 May that Mr. Shokin in fact was not investigating Burisma at the time of his removal in 2016.
    9. Mr. Lutsenko later told Bloomberg on 16 May that former Vice President Biden and his son were not subject to any current Ukrainian investigations, and that he had no evidence against them
    10. Attorney General Barr
    11. Burisma Holdings
    12. U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch
    13. Ina report published by the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP) on 22 July, two associates of Mr. Giuliani reportedly traveled to Kyiv in May 201Q and met with Mr. Bakanov and another close Zelenskyy adviser, Mr. Serhiy Shefir.
    14. think [President Zelenskyy] is going to make a deal with President Putin, and he will be invited to the White House.· And we look forward to seeing him. He's already been invited to the White House, and he wants to come. And I think he will. He's a very reasonable guy. He wants to see peace in Ukraine, and I think he will be coming very soon, actually
    15. U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sandland.
    16. U.S. Special Representative for Ulaaine Negotiations Kurt Volker
    17. Mr. T. Ulrich Brechbuhl
    18. The Ukrainian side was the first to publicly acknowledge the phone call. On the evening of 25 July, a readout was posted on the website of the Ukrainian President that contained the following line
    19. Mr. Giuliani
    20. Take a look at Ukraine. How come the FBI didn't take this server? Podesta told them to get out. He said, get out. So, how come the FBI didn't take the server from the DNC?")

      I could not find the 20 July 2019 exchange referenced here, but I did find the transcript from 16 July where Trump discussed the same matter with Fox News host Sean Hannity. This, if anything, establishes that these talking points were used with some frequency by President Trump throughout this period of time in mid-July of 2019. https://www.foxnews.com/transcript/trump-witch-hunt-drove-a-phony-wedge-between-us-russia

    21. EO 13526, Part 1, Section 1.7
    22. EO 13 526, Part 1, Section 1. 1
    23. Executive Order (EO) 13526
    24. 50 U.S.C. §3033(k)(5)(G)
    25. 50 U.S.C. §3033(k)(5)(A)
  4. Feb 2019
    1. Please note that in the interest of ensuring that existing Bitly Links continue to function for all of our users, the Bitly Links that you have created and shared cannot be deleted or disabled (even if your Account is deactivated), and any shortening and sharing activity that has already occurred on your Account also cannot be deleted (but your user history can be set to private from within your Account settings).

      This means that there are no time boundaries around the use of shortened URLs, and that this data persists basically forever.

  5. Jul 2018
    1. The building of equitable, agentic, and open learning is neither an insignificant nor effortless social accomplishment.

      I spot an understatement! I continue to be amazed whenever I encounter this.

  6. May 2018
  7. Apr 2018
    1. As learning architects, we should ask of ourselves and our partners: How do our technologies and social practices cohere in service of more open infrastructure?

      I'd suggest that an important consideration for these social practices is carefully tracking which labor is valued and which perhaps is not. The influences of prestige economy upon open practices and open projects, in my experience, reifies rigid architectures. Sustaining open endeavors, for instance, tends to be less valued than "creating" them.

    2. Every course, every semester, and every workshop is a mutable foundation upon which to build for empathy rather than efficiency, to architect relations of curiosity and variance rather than similarity and control.

      I fully agree. and likewise see opportunities to balance power, to affirm we are all teachers and learners in these spaces.

    1. Compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”)

      points awarded for a specific FERPA stanza. Unclear what kinds of educational records may be made available to the service.

    2. What other parties can see me on Poll Everywhere?

      this, in essence, waters down basically everything about a privacy policy. It is at the point of 3rd-party involvement where the wheels fall off the cart.

    3. Updated March 23, 2018

      also recent update.

    1. Effective: February 23rd, 2018

      fairly recent effective date for this policy is a good sign. some of these from other companies can get rather stale.

    2. Don't rip off our stuff.

      tone is interesting. It's engaging, but the 'thou shalt not' nature of these assertions, combined with this language, is a little intimidating, also. It would be nice to see this same tone applied to a summary statement of how Poll Everywhere was looking out for user data protection, etc.

    3. Friendly summary

      this is a good way to start.

    1. And we can literally look at the software to see what the intentions behind online learning are: “speed grading,” test proctoring, plagiarism detection, automation (e.g., personalization), student monitoring and surveillance.

      I believe we are missing an opportunity to develop student centered software that emphasizes individual metacognitive awareness, instead of platform centered edu-analytics. Not only would this seem to require an opt-in default, it is not hidden within instructor-only dashboards.

    2. when we omit seminar classes or dialectical teaching and learning from online course offerings, we create an inequity.

      I agree with this criticism of online courses, and I think it is becoming easier to support dialectical teaching and learning within online courses but my sense is it would also require a synchronous scenario. As I parse this article, I wonder how many of these shortcomings might be mitigated by more online synchronous teaching and learning. On the other hand, I think one of the more desirable characteristics of online courses or programs for students is their asynchronous-ness. Especially as this often allows their participation around work, family obligations, etc.

    3. Have we built, do we sustain, an online learning that embraces these students? Do our online courses actually accommodate them?

      In my experience, I think we do a somewhat better job at the graduate level of accommodating the particular students enrolled, especially in applied disciplines where project-based and collaborative pedagogies are abundant.

    4. What are the assumptions behind this rationale? At the very least, putting this course online because “the teacher will be too busy to teach it” betrays a belief in an inherent, marked difference between learning and teaching that happens in the classroom and learning and teaching that happens online.

      I can't speak to this particular rationale (too busy to teach), but I have heard similarly questionable rationale for developing online courses. The opposite is true for me, also. I've seen folks work to bring courses online in order to support students who almost certainly would not be able to participate in a conventional face to face context. I'm curious to learn from others about the range of motivations for developing online courses or programs.

    5. We will be annotating this article as part of our hypothes.is workshop at OLC Innovate 2018. Please join us throughout the day on 18 April 2018.

  8. Jul 2017
    1. We do not currently recognize or respond to browser-initiated Do Not Track signals as there is no consistent industry standard for compliance.

      I just did a quick search of this language, and it seems to appear in many privacy policies. How should this be interpreted by a user of this service? Do browser-initiated 'Do Not Track' settings do anything meaningful? Last question - who shoulders the burden of establishing this industry standard for compliance?

  9. Aug 2016