13 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2022
  2. Mar 2022
    1. Creative work is not complete until it is disseminated

      This is an interesting perspective, but are there cases where it's false?

      Link to the idea at CAA that you haven't really read a script unless you've actively acted upon what you've read.

  3. Oct 2021
  4. Sep 2021
    1. “I think that everybody knows that we are in this incredible inflection point for humanity. And I think that what we don’t appreciate enough is that artists are the angel investors in the future that we want. They just have a different form of capital.”

      — Amanda Joy Ravenhill, Executive Director, Buckminster Fuller Institute

      (3:10:40)

      This quote connects to the Stop Reset Go meeting where Derick Bedzra walked us through the eight forms of capital.

    1. The Young Society's focus is showcasing young artists who have a passion for creativity.

      As Brad Jarvis pointed out to me, this sounds a lot like WeMakeStuff, which is the project that connected Brad and me. I had the privilege of working on WeMakeStuff Volume 02.

      Now that we are working together on the builders collective with the Design Science Studio, it is very interesting that Rachel Kehler and The Young Society are focusing on the theme of resilience, as design for resilience has been the focus of the builders collective.

      Design for Resilience was the project I submitted in my application to the Design Science Studio on June 12, 2020.

    1. Before beginning this piece I'm reminded to note some advice given to me by Rick Kurtzman at Creative Artists Agency (CAA) on reading scripts: If you're not going to act on having read (a script), then why bother having read it in the first place?

      He meant to make notes, write coverage, create writer lists for rewriting, producer lists for selling, director list for directing, casting lists. One should tell people about the (good) things one read. Make your reading produce something.

  5. Aug 2021
    1. This might sound scandalous depending on your understanding of creativity. I'm personally a subscriber to the everything is a remix and great artists steal schools of thought.

      I remember screenwriter Millard Kaufman gesturing to his large home library and saying that he didn't write anything brilliant himself, but that he borrowed from the best.

  6. May 2021
    1. “but I how will I be able to find stuff later on?”. Good question we’ll answer later. A part of the answer is simply by re-reading. If you don’t re-read what you’ve written, nothing will ever happen with it. So, if you intent to simply write down thoughts in order to feel a temporary moment of relief, fine. But if you intent to change your life, that won’t suffice.

      One needs to re-read and reprocess things from time to time. This is a part of the combinatorial creativity that having notes is for.

      This is reminiscent of the CAA addage: "If you read something and then don't tell anyone about it, you may as well not have read it in the first place."

  7. Sep 2020
  8. Apr 2019
    1. the manuscripts that were discovered nine years ago, now in the University of Arkansas library with many of her other papers, are mostly complete and easily performed.

      I do recall this happening way more than it should. Not only just A.A but many other colored people. Thousands of art just now being discovered. As a woman of afo-latina descent it makes me proud to know more and more blacks of all ethnicities are becoming prominent in art today.

  9. Sep 2018
    1. To add to "More scholarship about CC licenses" and to support unit 4.1: Bishop, Carrie. “Creative Commons and Open Access Initiatives: How to Stay Sane and Influence People.” Art Libraries Journal 40.4 (2015): 8–12. Web.

      Bishop presents a cheerful exploration of the Tate’s mammoth enterprise to digitize and release into the public Web 52,000 works of art, many of which are still under copyright. Commonly, galleries and museums would like to broaden exposure to the artwork in their collections, but when artists or their descendants are still actively monitoring use and income, there can be a barrier between connecting the public with the art work and the needs of the artistic community. Bishop describes the Tate’s desire to license the newly digitized images under a Creative Commons license to provide clear guidelines to the public, but at the same time to respond to the fears, hopes, and wishes of their artists. The Tate decided that it could best realize its goal to "democratize access" and to connect the public with British artists through applying the CC-BY-NC-ND license—both making the images available and quelling the concerns of the artists or their estate managing family members. The article provides an interesting perspective to the discussion of “open culture” or “free culture.” Some of this freedom may come about in incremental doses. The CC license might make it possible to allow an artist to connect their work with a larger public, at the same time that it makes them confident that their work won’t be misused or appropriated in an undesired manner. Aart museums seem to have a difficult relationship with open access and Creative Commons licensing. The Getty, for instance, has a fairly complicated statement of terms that make murky all that CC transparency, so there is viewing the material and then there is repurposing the material. The result is that a slow, measured pace, while nurturing the artist along, may be the way to ultimately make CC and Open Access a norm rather than an exception.