5 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. The idea of Geisha has a similarity to tummelling, but doesn't translate as well to English for historical reasons. (This is similar to Anthony Bourdain's take/discussion of Geisha in his series A Cook's Tour season 1, episode 2: "Dining with Geishas").

      Tummeller is someone who bridges the in groups and the outgroups.

    2. https://youtu.be/qYsMtroVLeA?t=287

      The big thing that I want to talk about here is out groups. This is a phenomenon that we that we see, which is that it's very very easy for people to decide that someone else is not like them they're different and they should be shunned and talked about.

      This is the minimal group paradigm. Thanks to Rashmi for giving that term. [It] says the smallest possible difference will be magnified into in group and an outgroup. Kevin Marks, Web 2.0 Expo NY 09: "...New Words You Need to Know to Understand the Web"

      Perhaps we can decrease the levels of fear and racism in our society by tummelling? By bringing in outsiders, treating them with dignity and respect within your own group of friends, you can help to normalize their presence by decreasing the irrational fears that others have built up and carry with them about these supposed outsiders.

    3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYsMtroVLeA

      Buzzwords for understanding the new internet

      Importance of words (neologisms) for helping us to communicate.

      retweets as a means of bringing new faces into your stream to expand your in-group.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Kevin Marks </span> in Epeus' epigone: Publics, Flow, Phatic, Tummeling and Out-groups - New Words You Need to Know to Understand the Web (<time class='dt-published'>09/06/2021 15:15:38</time>)</cite></small>

  2. Jul 2021
    1. Earlier this year, a group of writers with popular tech and culture newsletters expanded upon this premise; they joined together to launch a Discord server called Sidechannel where all their subscribers could meet and chat. (“So it’s just people paying for internet friends?” asked one woman I know when this arrangement was described to her. Yes, and currently Sidechannel has some 5,000 members, several hundred of whom may be active at a given time.)

      There's something a bit depressing about the idea of paying for online friends. Though creating, managing, and tummeling these sorts of community is definitely a form of social and creative "work".

      How much work do these creators do on this front? How much is the writing and creating versus the management and community building? What else goes into it all?

      Compare and contrast the work done by individuals in the IndieWeb community.

  3. Oct 2020
    1. In the last few months I actually came across Derek's side of the story and so I dug back into archives (literally archive.org) to find the original show and catch the blog post conversation around this controversy. I particularly recall Ira and Jeff Jarvis' conversations. Somehow I didn't see Kevin's portion of the conversation in the comments sections of the others, but I'm glad to have it pop up just a few weeks later to complete the circle.

      Of the group, Kevin, as usual, provides some of the best analysis, but he also adds in a huge amount of additional context by way of links.

      Society seems to have ripped itself open recently and I can't help but think that we're going to need some strong tummelers and heavy work to allow everyone to speak, be heard, and create some change. Kevin's piece here may be a good starting point.

      Perhaps this is the piece some of our mainstream media have been missing from a journalistic perspective? For too long they've acted as aggregators and filters, but perhaps they should be spending a larger portion of their time doing some tummeling work on our behalf?