78 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2020
  3. Jun 2020
    1. The easiest way I've found to manage that is to copy hardware-configuration.nix and a minimal version of configuration.nix and import it into the NixOps config for the corresponding machine. (I keep them in a git submodule, but keeping them in the same repo could also make sense.) 1 Pick your reaction

      If I understood it correctly, take the hardware-configration.nix from the target machine, and put it into the NixOps config.

      Also relevant: Minimal NixOS config for Nixops deployment (discourse)

    1. prioritize technology, for example, as these are easier elements to hook onto

      In my campus's summer professional development, prep for next term's "remote learning," many colleagues are seeing this limitation. Tech is the sparkly thing, easy to focus on. We say "pedagogy before technology," but many are really focused on what tech to use, how to preserve as much of last year's f2f as possible, etc. Most of which isn't helping plan for fall classes.

  4. May 2020
    1. ""Long before the pandemic, I had reduced the value of midterms and final exams to 30% of the grade in an online versions of a science course, with formative quizzing, discussion fora, short writing assignments, exam-style essay questions and a one or more short (2-6 page) essays making up 70%. The only difference between this and a blended version of the course was that online discussion fora were reduced to a no credit chat function, and that classroom discussions were prompted by clicker questions and a few collaborative short writing assignments on index cards. I even gave credit small credit for for bringing in questions at the start of class that led to students engaging with each other at the start of class. I gave online formative objective quizzes and at least a few summative exams online in both versions of the class. To minimize cheating, online quiz and exam questions chosen were pulled from topic-specific question banks and then randomized by the LMS; even the responses to MC questions were randomized where possible. To maximize learning and reduce stress, I timed the assessments to allow at lest 2 minutes per questions and explicitly told students that he quizzes and exams were open book and collaborative; also, students could take the quizzes twice and get the higher of the scores. I usually gave the final exam in class, in which case the only stress-reducers were a 10%-of-grade valuation and 2 minutes per question (essay questions had already been done online). In all cases, students needing extra time got it.

      I am retired and was not forced by COVID-19 to teach online. I'd like to think that my colleagues will undertake deliberate course redesign during quieter times, just for pedagogic reasons. Those of us who enjoy F2F teaching (I, for one) will then be prepared to move their classes online as an expedient and not a jaw-dropping challenge during a future grand disruption of life... even including 'timed exams'""

    1. Our primary goal must be to create as rich an academic experience as possible, in whatever form that will take, while preparing to bring us back together at the earliest feasible moment. No doubt social distancing techniques will be with us for some time, which, of course, complicates the logistics of the return. Taking these and other factors into account, we have made one key decision: to prepare to use the three upcoming academic terms—fall 2020, spring 2021, and summer 2021—as a unit of time in order to provide us with the greatest amount of flexibility in organizing our educational experiences.  By leveraging a longer period of time, we will be able to de-densify our campus so that all students may experience much, if not most, of their coursework in person over the arc of the three terms. While this is just the beginning of a University-wide effort to determine the specifics of the academic year, we now have the capacity to tap into the rich expertise and creativity of our University leaders and faculty to shape the substance and content of this one-time arrangement. By July 1, Ira Katznelson, our spectacular deans, and I will have more details to share about how the three terms will be composed. 

      eğitimi üç döneme yayarak kampüs yoğunluğunu azaltmak ve öğrencilerin kendilerine zaman ayırmalarını sağlamak

    1. The unique approach divides the normal academic term of 13 weeks and four courses into two blocks of two courses, each six weeks plus two days long.

      dividing committees into online and on campus small segments and condensing to make more time available to students

    1. The course, Jones said, covered disease and widespread death and family separation. “And all of a sudden, here we were living amidst a worldwide pandemic,

      important also for med students

    2. Jones did make one change, adding a question that asked students to reflect on their experience during the pandemic, and how it will shape their approach to studying family history.

      reflection questiğon about pandemic could be important for med students and may change their approach to exam and honor code also. people who think they have a free will, act more ethical compared to who doesn't.

    3. That was Jen Heemstra’s experience. Heemstra, an associate professor in chemistry at Emory University, was already giving open-book, open-note exams. That practice stems from her conviction that the skill students will really need is accessing and applying information, not memorizing it. This semester, she and her co-instructor took an additional step: giving students more time.

      online exams open book

    4. The course’s final should take students about an hour, but the instructors will give them 48 hours to complete it.

      timing

    1. Everyone works remote, but you don't feel remote. We don't have a head office, so you're not in a satellite office.
    1. kerja remote itu nggak ada templatenya

      Harus mencoba mencari cara yang cocok untuk diri sendiri, bereksperimen dan tingkatkan. Iterasi.

  5. Apr 2020
    1. This is a great time to individualize instruction and have students work at different paces. You don’t want 100-120 papers coming at you all at one time. Spread it out, and it will keep you from getting short-tempered with your students.

      As the educational system operates today, many teachers easily put in 60 hours of work per week. But when you teach remotely, it sounds like work becomes much more manageable.

      Do I want to become a teacher? If I can teach like this I do—and no, not because it seems easier but because it seems easier AND more effective.

    2. For my more advanced students, they need to learn research skills: how to locate, evaluate, and use information. Online learning offers great opportunities for that, including with what’s going on in the news right now.

      ...how to function independently in the world too.

    3. Then there is the option of getting students to talk to each other online on discussion boards and videoconferences. Some students adapt to it quickly and like it. Some don’t, because it feels impersonal. You have to be patient with that and give them some time and space to adjust.

      Introverts v extroverts. Oil and water. They've always differed, always will. Maybe this virtual, personalized learning movement will finally allow introverts to stop feeling so defeated in the presence of extroverts who live so much more loudly than they do. Finally, they'll be able to live peacefully in their own mind, undisturbed by the stress of feelings like you need to be more extroverted to fit in.

      Btw: I'm not encouraging each party to distance themselves from each other all the time. What I am saying is that when value is trying to be distributed, distribute it however it'll best be received. Then, later, once teaching time is over, they can socialize in traditional ways... IF that's what they want to do.

    4. Rizga: How have you been translating this online?Moore: It depends on the student. Some students work very well asynchronously. They are very comfortable working alone on a draft; I make color-coded comments in a word document or their PDF, and then I send it back. Some students need me to explain things to them in person before I send them the comments; we’ll do a video or audio chat. Others need even more interaction: I’ll hook them up to a videoconference, and we’ll go through all the comments together. Some students I need to refer to a grammar-brushup program or a YouTube video on how to do some of the mechanical stuff like uploading papers online.

      Sounds like Mrs. Moore deserves a raise! This woman knows what's up! She represents the future while living in a community that (probably) latches on to tradition.

      Any of you big city school systems reading this? If you are, hire her. You can probably pay her less than what your other teachers are earning and still give her a bump in pay compared to what she's earning in Mississippi.

    5. The other big issue is that many of the teachers don’t have the skills to teach online.

      Sorry, but this begs the question...

      Should teachers who don't have the skills to teach online be teaching at all? If they can't, they're either not qualified for the job or they're unwilling to put in the effort required to learn.

    6. We are in the midst of the most sweeping education experiment in history. The coronavirus pandemic has forced the majority of the U.S.’s 3.6 million educators to find ways to teach without what most of them consider the core part of their craft—the daily face-to-face interactions that help them elicit a child’s burning desire to investigate something; detect confusion or a lack of engagement; and find the right approach, based on a student’s body language and participation in the classroom, to help students work through their challenges.

      There's a reason education fails so often: teachers teach students as if they all have identical interests and learning styles.

      There's no such thing as a one-size-fits all solution to any problem. Everyone knows that. Even dumb people do. Yet there are our educators, the people we're supposed to depend on to set the table for our lives, to show us what's important, what we she commit to memory for the rest of our life or else that life's gonna die having led a dumb life, because you didn't do what you were told to do way back when: understand everything the teacher told you to understand, yeah, even if you didn't give a fuck about what's coming out of her mouth. Learn that shit anyway.

      Oh, and learn it how I say you should learn it too. Sit in that seat, lock your eyes on me, and take notes at a speed that's equal to or faster than the rate of my speech... just like all the students around you are (trying) to do... because everyone learns new information in the same way... right?

    7. Then, you have to think about accessibility issues. How will my vision-impaired and deaf students access it? Have I put everything in print? Do I have to put in some audio? There are whole series of checks you have to do for different access issues.

      Sure, new problems will surface. But so will solutions. And hopefully, in the end, there will be fewer problems using the new approach than the old.

  6. Mar 2020
    1. In the age of innovation, when you realize that an innovative, empathetic and inclusive organization is the winning recipe, then remote work starts to look like a huge opportunity. 
    2. remote work can present an opportunity for all of us to think about what it truly means to collaborate and how it can improve our organizations
  7. Feb 2020
    1. Don't let burnout creep up on you. Working remotely can allow us to create bad habits, such as working straight through lunch to get something finished. Once in a while this feels good, perhaps to check that nagging task or big project off the list, but don't let this become a bad habit. Before long, you'll begin to feel the effects on your body and see it in your work.
  8. Dec 2019
    1. meeting of the Global Forum in Stellenbosch, South Africa, on 13 and 14 November 2018

      I followed this remotely via Twitter (don't know whether other remote channels were available). My notes on this sit at https://github.com/Daniel-Mietchen/events/issues/508 .

  9. May 2019
    1. In early occult and spiritualist literature, remote viewing was known as telesthesia and travelling clairvoyance. Rosemary Guiley described it as "seeing remote or hidden objects clairvoyantly with the inner eye, or in alleged out-of-body travel."
  10. Nov 2018
    1. Holographic computing made possible

      Microsoft hololens is designed to enable a new dimension of future productivity with the introduction of this self-contained holographic tools. The tool allows for engagement in holograms in the world around you.

      Learning environments will gain ground with the implementation of this future tool in the learning program and models.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  11. Oct 2017
    1. We are in a moment when telecommuting seems to be falling out of favor. The conventional wisdom about remote work is shifting.  Once held up as the future of work, telecommuting is now viewed as antithetical to the needs of today’s agile organizations.

      Not sure this is a wide-ranging trend.

  12. Jul 2017
    1. Employees under 35 prefer office life to remote working

      According to a recent survey, the younger generation prefer working from the office to remote working, unlike baby boomers, who would rather work from home.

  13. Apr 2017
  14. Mar 2017
  15. Feb 2017
    1. Comparison of ITCD algorithms is challenging when there are differences in study focus, study area, data applied, and accuracy assessment method used. Before 2005, the few studies that compared methods generally tested approaches on a common dataset.

      This difficulty in comparing algorithms (due to differences in forest type, location, and assessment strategy used for different algorithms) indicates a clear need for set of open data and centralized assessment to allow different methods to be competed against one another to determine the best routes forward.

      This kind of approach has been very successful in other image analysis problems (e.g., ImageNET).

      The National Ecological Observatory Network data seems ideal for doing something like this. Data is/will be available for a variety of different systems and with LiDAR, Hyperspectral, RGB, and field data for large numbers of plots.

    2. Additionally, it is often challenging to apply an algorithm developed in one forest type to another area.

      This difficulty of applying across forest types is central to the challenges of developing approaches that can be applied to continental scale data collection like that being conducted by NEON. Overcoming this challenge will likely require incorporating ecological information into models, not just the remote sensing, and determining how to choose and adjust different approaches to get the best delineations possible based on information about the forest type/location.

    3. The most useful information that can be incorporated into ITCD studies is the expected crown size and stand density [25,67].

      This kind of data is available for NEON plots and so these methods could potentially be well leveraged with NEON data. This would be particularly true if the NEON plot data could be used to develop a spatial model for these features that could be used to predict their values across space.

    4. Only 23 studies actually integrated both active and passive data sources into the ITCD procedure since 2000 (Figure 2).

      Only a small fraction of studies combine LiDAR and Hyperspectral data for the crown delineation phase of analysis.

    5. Another limitation is that few approaches take full advantage of the information contained within remotely sensed data, e.g., using only one band of multispectral imagery [29] or only the canopy height model derived from LiDAR data [30]. Significant amounts of information are dismissed or neglected during data preparation or processing. The integration of multispectral data and discrete LiDAR data is commonly used to improve tree species classification [10] and fusion of passive and active remotely sensed data may reduce commission and omission errors in ITCD results [31].

      Excellent point about the importance of integrating all available data to make the best possible crown delineations. In the case of the National Ecological Observatory Network Airborne Observation Platform methods that leverage the LiDAR, hyperspectral, and high-resolution RGB photographic data should have the potential to outperform methods that ignore components of this data.

  16. Nov 2016
    1. MODIS provides consistent information on active fires, with omission and commission errors quantified in past work using ground observations and higher-resolution satellite imagery [e.g., (29–31)]

      More detailed data was required to supplement the MODIS based remote sensing to fully understand how it could be used for quantifying fire.

  17. Jul 2016