142 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2024
    1. it would in most cases be sufficient to indexfrom the most authoritative paper

      When possible, use the most authoritative source in your work, but one should balance this out with the additional work required to find and quote that source versus taking it from a secondary and reliable source.

      Academic researchers ought to default to the original and most authoritative, but others may find it more expedient and just as valuable to rely on secondary sources.

  2. Mar 2024
    1. Participants reported less stigma as well as more investment, satisfaction, commitment and greater communication about the relationship with primary compared to secondary relationships, but a greater proportion of time on sexual activity with secondary compared to primary relationships.

      polyrelationships can vary, the primary rel is m+ convient seen better socially but the second is b+ sexually

  3. Feb 2024
    1. “The beginning and end of Olte’s transformation,” commentsKlaus Latzel, “can be best illustrated by two letters from his corre-spondence home: ‘Oh I’d love to be out there with the soldiers,’ inMay 1940, and ‘When will this endless murdering be over?’ fromMay 1944.”17 Soldiers such as Albert Neuhaus and Hans Olte con-tinued to fight and to kill, mostly out of a sense of duty and a desireto protect Germany itself, but they no longer thought of themselvesas vanguards of National Socialism
    2. In time of war and separation, the letters to andfrom soldiers serving on the front lines were precious signs of life.They were avowals of love and longings for home. They describedthe battlefield and conditions of military occupation and eventuallyprovided historians with crucial documents about popular attitudestoward the war and knowledge about the Holocaust.
    3. Among the items most frequentlyconfiscated from German Jews as they boarded deportation trainswere blank postcards and postage stamps; authorities in Würzburgcollected 358 six-pfennig postcards, 142 six-pfennig stamps, and273 twelve-pfennig stamps before sending deportees on their wayon 24 March 1942
    4. One Berliner “watched his fellow passengers as he trav-eled past the burning Fasenenstrasse synagogue between the S-Bahnstations Savignyplatz and Zoologischer Garten the next morning:‘only a few looked up to see out the window, shrugged their shoul-ders, and went back to their paper.
    5. The cities are administeredby mayors and councilmen drawn from his movement. The govern-ments of the states and the state parliaments are in the hands ofparty members
    6. apoliceman’s “perp book”: “a small selection” of photographs fea-tured photographs of the imprisoned physicians, lawyers, and otherprofessionals whose newly shaven heads created the “eternal sem-blances” by which Jews dissolved into criminals.1
    7. “What am I going to do?” won-dered Richard Tesch, an owner of a bakery in Ballendstedt’s mar-ketplace: “Israel has been buying goods from me for a long time.Am I supposed to no longer sell to him? And if I do it anyway, thenI’ve lost the other customers.
    8. s aresult, Victor Klemperer could repeatedly “run into” one of Hitler’sReichstag speeches. “I could not get away from it for an hour. Firstfrom an open shop, then in the bank, then from a shop again.”66Radio as well as film turned Nazism into spectacle.
    9. Tacked onto the doorways of apartments, posters, labels, and badgesattested to the fact that nearly all residents belonged to the People’sWelfare or contributed to Winter Relief.

      signaling you belonged, if you didnt participate you were probably suspected of being a subversive

    10. Young people don’t walk anymore; they march.” “Ev-erywhere friends are professing themselves for Hitler.” To livein Nazi Germany, Ebermayer wrote, was to “become ever morelonely.”
    11. “Hei hatte sagt, wer non ganz un gar nichwolle, vor dän in Deutschland keine Raum”—“he said there is noroom in Germany for people who simply refuse to take part.”
    12. Hermann Aue “(very Left),” thoughtthe Nazis would be gone within a year, so he was inclined to stickwith the Social Democrats. But several Communists who had re-portedly joined a local SA group suspected that the Nazis would bearound for some time.
    13. In this case it was the Nuremberg Laws, which distinguished Ger-man citizens from Jewish noncitizens: “hunting down innocentpeople is expanded a thousand times,” he raged; “hate is sown amillionfold.”
    14. The fact is that it is totally possible,” he carefully noted,“that the National Socialist state would use such a law to make it aduty for those without means and who are dependent on handoutsfrom the state to more or less ‘voluntarily’ take their lives.
    15. “the police have theresponsibility to safeguard the organic unity of the German people,its vital energies, and its facilities from destruction and disintegra-tion.” This definition gave the police extremely wide latitude. Any-thing that did not fit the normative standards of the people’s com-munity or could be construed as an agent of social dissolutiontheoretically fell under the purview of the police.
    16. We have to go with the times, even if thereare many, many things that we do not agree with. To swim againstthe current just makes matters worse.”
    17. What was necessary, he insisted, was to“recognize yourself” (“Erkenne dich selbst”), which meant identi-fying with the idealized portraits of new Germans and following thetenets of hereditary biology to find a suitable partner for marriage,to marry only for love, and to provide the Volk with healthy chil-dren.
    18. In November in Weimar, he promised that “if to-day there are still people in Germany who say: ‘We are not goingjoin your community, but stay just as we always have been,’ then Isay: ‘You will die off, but after you there will a young generationthat doesn’t know anything else!’”

      brah

    19. The journalistSebastian Haffner noted that people in his circle in Berlin suddenlyfelt authorized to express an opinion on the “Jewish question,”speaking fluently about quotas on Jews, percentages of Jews, anddegrees of Jewish influence
    20. During the war Klemperer, like so manyother Jews, was forced to move into the drastically smaller quartersof a “Jew house,” which meant that he had to dispose of books andpapers. “[I] am virtually ravaging my past,” he wrote in his di-ary on 21 May 1941. “The principal activity” of the next daywas “burning, burning, burning for hours on end: heaps of letters,manuscripts.

      nazis enforced the creation of aryan archives and forced the destruction of jewish ones, creating an imbalance in how much material there was in order to control the historical narrative

    21. As a result, Germans could imagine one another infront of the radio listening to the same program: “Sunday isWunschkonzert,” wrote one soldier to his family back home; “youcertainly will be listening too.”
    22. He believed Germans feltthat “it’s just us now” when they lived without Jews. “Just us” alsoexpressed the closed circle in which Germans could see and experi-ence “ourselves” as “we are” and as “we have become.”
    23. but even then nothing made the “com-munity of fate” more compelling than “the conviction that therewill no longer be future for Germany after a lost war.”

      sunk-cost fallacy-- they put so much investment into this, they can't back out

    24. “Ifonly the good old days would come back again, just one more time.Why do we have to have this dreadful war, which has disrupted ourpeaceful lives, broken our happiness, and dissolved all our big andlittle hopes for a new house into nothing?”
    25. But when the German cheers wouldnot stop, “Hitler sensed a popular mood, a longing for peace andreconciliation.” This was also an indication of the general content-ment with things as they were.
    26. heexplained in tears that her two sons had fallen in battle and the bal-lot had been their voice. 61The text precisely captures the way many people thought of Ger-many: as the tenacious underdog finally asserting its rights.
    27. The dreamof the Volkswagen seemed to promise “a new, happier age” thatwould make “the German people rich and Germany beautiful,” asHitler put it. Indeed, the Volkswagen functioned as a symbol for thenewly won capacity to dream about the future: in this fundamentalsense, the Nazis appeared as “men of the future.”
    28. he reports confirm that workers creditedHitler, in particular, for the restoration of economic stability.

      note: consider lean of the documents. hitler employees have reason to write reports speaking well of their progress, plus climate of fear may have been pressuring workers to speak well of hitler. nevertheless valid point

    29. the reports indicate that “workers not only wereunfree . . . but that most of them felt they were unfree, exploited,discriminated against and the victims of an unfair, class-ridden soci-ety.” Even during the boom years of 1937–39, “signs indicated thatNazism was further losing ground among workers.”

      counter to the argument made in the chapter, many workers under the nazi regime did not feel as though enough progress was being made

    30. Ger-mans wore special badges to show they had donated their marks;the badges functioned so as to make citizens accountable to them-selves. “On Sundays,” Hauser remarked, “when collecting for theWinter-Relief Fund is going on in the streets no one would darewalk abroad without a badge pinned conspicuously to his coat.”
    31. One-potmeals on the first Sunday of every month provided opportunitiesfor party representatives to go from door to door in the evening asthey collected the pfennigs that had been “saved,” and to snoop.

      volunteer activity as a PR cover for nazis, an opportunity to see who might be a subversive, and to create atmosphere of fear among people who didn't contribute to the cause. very red-scare "snitch on your neighbor"-esque

    32. Evenbefore Hitler spoke (8:00 p.m.), the choreography of May Day hadfastened the links between workers and the nation, between ma-chinists and machine-age dreams, between technical mastery andnational prowess
    33. “Something had to be done”—these were the simple, conclusive words voiced by a friend of KarlDürkefälden’s, jobless and a new convert to Nazism. His wordswere echoed by thousands of workers in the winter and springof 1933; though a socialist, Karl himself understood—“it’s truetoo,” he added parenthetically in his diary entry.
    34. Dürkefälden wasalso able to describe something Elisabeth Gebensleben could not,namely, the story of how working-class conversions helped to cre-ate National Socialism.
    35. When Karl pro-tested that local Nazis had arrested young workers in the neigh-borhood and seized a trade union building, his father retorted indialect, “Ordnung mot sein,” “You have to have order.”
    36. “he doesn’t want to take part in any waragain,” Karl reported; “he has had enough.”
    37. restricting their rep-resentation in the professions to their proportion in the population:“that is one percent.” Moreover, she explained, “Jews want to rule,not serve.” The proof: “have you ever heard of a Jewish maid or aJewish laundry woman?”
    38. “I was overcomewith a burning desire to belong to these people for whom it was amatter of life and death.” Maschmann herself was drawn to the“socialist tendency” of the Nazi movement, the idea of the people’scommunity,
    39. the officially organized boycott of Jewish businesses on 1April 1933 required a more considered answer. Elisabeth beganwith a concession, contrasting the “happiness” of the world-histor-ical events taking place in Germany with her “sympathy” for “thefate of the individual.”
    40. ample, “is now a Nazi because of his job, but only for show.”Peine’s barber was in the SA, but Karl thought for “professionalreasons” only.
    41. what he saw was an increas-ingly Nazified community in which neighbors now took notice ofKarl’s behavior and club members adjusted their own. What Karlwas resisting as he stood alongside his wife was the pressure to con-form, if only for the sake of appearances.
    42. sincediscussions about Jewish suffering frequently switched to the sub-ject of German suffering: “Versailles” had taken the “opportunitiesfor life” away from Germans, who were now “completely under-standably” fighting back on behalf of their “own sons.”

      "versailles" refers to the treaty of versailles, which placed the debt of ww1 on germany and tanked the economy.

    1. The history of Arabia just before the birth of Islam is a profound mystery, with few written sources describing the milieu in which Muhammad lived.

      Few primary sources before Islam

  4. Jan 2024
    1. So we're good with three-dimensional space, but imagine if we had a primary sense of our own blood chemistry.

      for - adjacency between - primary sense of cellular metabolism - experiences of deep contemplative practice of Rainbow Body - adjacency statement - As per Father Francis Tiso's research into the Tibetan deep contemplative Dzogchen phenomena of Rainbow Body at the time of death as well as rigpa, Trekcho and Togal, he speculates that - such deep contemplations can potentially result in a primary sense of cellular and even subatomic processes taking place within the human body. - https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FsDyu39FCAMk%2F&group=world - It seems that the multi-scale competency architecture would be a good scientific framework to explore these questions.

      So we're good with three-dimensional space, - but imagine if we had a primary sense of our own blood chemistry. - If you could feel your blood chemistry - the way that you currently see and smell and taste things that are around you, - I think we would have absolutely no problem having an intuitive understanding - of physiological-state space - the way we do for three-dimensional space.

      claim - Lifetime practitioners of Tibetan meditation claim they have a primary sensation of their own impending death suggestion - Suggest to Michael Levin to investigate such phenomena from a multi-scale competency architecture perspective - What else can the expert meditators directly experience? And how do they achieve this? How can deep contemplative practice result in such profound experiences? Would expert meditators resonate with Levin's framework?

  5. Aug 2023
    1. If you are using UUIDs instead of integers as the primary key on your models, you should set Rails.application.config.generators { |g| g.orm :active_record, primary_key_type: :uuid } in a config file.
  6. Jul 2023
  7. Apr 2023
    1. https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/ushistory1/

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Dan Allosso</span> in Welcome to US History & Primary Source Anthology, vol. 1 (<time class='dt-published'>08/21/2022 14:41:00</time>)</cite></small>

  8. Feb 2023
    1. To cover my knowledge management process would distract you from what works for you. Your question needs more context to be actionable.TL;DR; Whichever knowledge management system gets you paid.I've got 13 notes with the term "knowledge management," 15 with "information gathering," and 7 with "strategic intelligence." Without finishing a MOC, here's off the top of my head:Have a purpose or reason for learning.Ask helpful questions that solve problems.Answer questions as stand-alone notes.Learn from primary sources. Even boring ones.Take notes for your intended audience.Serve a specific audience (get paid.)Write about what people care about.Become a subject matter expert in target areas.Deliver what you know as a service first.Build on your strengths. Knowledge is cheap.It's not a process. More like tips. If demand exists, I'll write a book on the topic in a few years. Might be a good podcast topic.“No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.” -- Samuel Johnson, The Life of Samuel JohnsonRemember, there is no shortage of knowledge. Managing information is like masturbation; it feels good but doesn't do much. Focus on making information drive goal achievement.

      Some useful and solid advice here.

  9. Jan 2023
    1. Primary keys and foreign keys are the fundamental building blocks of the relational database because these are the components that make the relationships work while allowing tables to be accessed independently. One-to-many relationships between primary keys and foreign keys are thus defined as referential constraints in the physical database
  10. Dec 2022
    1. As Chris brains Jeremy with abocce ball, the deer’s head is prominent in the background of the shot. Wewould hypothesize that the deer is a reminder not only of his mother (viahis earlier experience with the dying doe), but also of his ancestors moregenerally. African rhythms begin to pulse as Chris takes down Jeremy, andas Chris’s eyes flick to the buck’s head, lyrics are whispered in Swahili, thesame as the opening credits, translating to “Something bad is coming, listento your ancestors, run.” Through this non-diegetic song, with its whisperedmessage from the ancestors, the deer effectively speaks. It then aids Chris inhis escape when the buck’s horns serve as a weapon to kill Dean Armitage

      BIG!!!!

    2. He is tied up in the game room, facingan old television set, above which is the taxidermied head of a large buck.Its appearance of life-in-death not only foreshadows Chris’s future state ifthe Armitages’ plot is carried off successfully, as a Black body occupied bywhite consciousness, but it also reverberates with characterizations of thehistorical devaluation of Black lives in Atlantic slavery, as socially deadnon-subjects
    3. plainly legible as having a connection to his nefariousconquest of Black lives, which he considers unworthy of being lived
    4. eacts in a strangely unsympathetic way. “Well, you know what I say?”he responds. “I say, one down, a couple hundred thousand to go. No, I don’tmean to get on my high horse, but I’m telling you, I do not like the deer.I’m sick of it. They’re taking over. They’re like rats. They’re destroying theecosystem. I see a dead deer on the side of the road, I think to myself, ‘That’sa start.’

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  11. Nov 2022
  12. Oct 2022
    1. Leopold von Ranke (German: [fɔn ˈʁaŋkə]; 21 December 1795 – 23 May 1886) was a German historian and a founder of modern source-based history.[3][4] According to Caroline Hoefferle, "Ranke was probably the most important historian to shape [the] historical profession as it emerged in Europe and the United States in the late 19th century".[5] He was able to implement the seminar teaching method in his classroom and focused on archival research and the analysis of historical documents. Building on the methods of the Göttingen School of History,[6] he was the first to establish a historical seminar. Ranke set the standards for much of later historical writing, introducing such ideas as reliance on primary sources (empiricism), an emphasis on narrative history and especially international politics (Außenpolitik). Ranke also had a great influence on Western historiography. He was ennobled in 1865, with the addition of a "von" to his name.
    1. I found in the files three relevant types of "existingmaterials": several theories having to do with the topic;materials already worked up by others as evidence forthose theories; and data already gathered and in variousstages of accessible centralization, but not yet madetheoretically relevant.
  13. Sep 2022
    1. We need not interpret in the Jewish oretymological sense the dictum of Renan : " I do notthink it possible for any one to acquire a clearnotion of history, its limits, and the amount ofconfidence to be placed in the different categoriesof historical investigation, unless he is in the habitof handling original documents." ^

      Renan, Essais de morale et de critique, p. 36

  14. Aug 2022
    1. While it is a fundamental principle that workscontemporary with an event are presumably more authenticthan later ones, it should be borne in mind that the morerecent secondary works are frequently based on more ma-terials and present new interpretations.
  15. Jul 2022
    1. the question you were asking was what is mind or consciousness so here we're using the words synonymously um and from a buddhist perspective uh there are 01:11:50 six what we call primary minds and then there's a whole slew of secondary minds and some of the more common systems include 51 in the secondary minds now please understand that mind like 01:12:04 everything else that exists in the world doesn't exist permanently it exists there are a few exceptions okay but essentially everything that exists in the world um is not permanent therefore 01:12:18 it's changing moment to moment therefore everything exists as a continuum including mind so that means there'll be a moment of mind followed by a next moment of mind etc 01:12:31 and the next moment of mind is determined primarily but not solely by the previous moment of mind so from that we can extrapolate a continuum an infinite continuum and mind is an 01:12:43 infinite continuum from perspective of buddhism and that means that we've had that implies suggests rebirth and it suggests we've had ultimate we've had infinite rebirths there's been no beginning 01:12:56 and so this then comes up again with the notion of a beginning creator if you will a so-called you know god there are some some problems here to resolve this um 01:13:07 and so mind is a continuum it's infinite now each moment of mind is made up of a primary mind and a constellation of secondary minds these six primary or the five as you read from nagarjuna the five 01:13:22 sensory minds of seeing hearing smelling tasting touching tactile right these five plus what's sometimes called the mental consciousness and that has live different levels of subtlety on the 01:13:34 grossest level is thinking if we go a little bit deeper a little bit more so little subtler we have dream mind which seems like these senses are active but actually 01:13:46 when we're sleeping the senses are inactive so it's just something coming from our sixth or mental consciousness it seems like the senses are active in dream mind that dream mind is a little more subtle than a wake mind awake 01:13:59 thinking mind and then if we go more subtle we're talking now again about awake mind we we talk about intuition when we're in intuition we're not thinking right it's a non-conceptual 01:14:11 mind uh in that sense and deeper yet our minds we call non-conceptual and non-dual where there's no awareness of a subject or an object so subject object non-duality so 01:14:25 that's kind of the rough sort of you know lay of the land

      Barry provides a brief summary of what the word "mind" means from a Buddhist philosophy perspective and says that there are six primary minds and 51 secondary minds.

      The 6 primary minds are the 5 senses plus mental consciousness, which itself consists of the coarse thinking (conceptual) mind, the intuitive mind (these two could be roughly mapped to Daniel Kahnaman's fast and slow system respectively), as well as the dreaming mind.

      Barry also conveys an interpretation of reincarnation based on the concept that the mind is never the same from one moment to the next, but is rather an ever changing continuum. The current experience of mind is GENERALLY most strongly influenced by the previous moments but also influenced by temporally distant memories. This above interpretation of reincarnation makes sense, as the consciousness is born anew in every moment. It is also aligned to the nature of the Indyweb interpersonal computing ecosystem, in which access to one's own private data store, the so-called Indyhub, allows one to experience the flow of consciousness by seeing how one's digital experience, which is quite significant today, affects learning on a moment to moment basis. In other words, we can see, on a granular level, how one idea, feeling or experience influences another idea, experience or feeling.

    1. the six 00:48:41 six big systems i've mentioned can be viewed as a cognitive architecture it's the it's the means by which the society learns decides adapts and 00:48:54 and this society's efforts this is the third underlying position the society's efforts to learn decide and adapt and be viewed as being driven by an intrinsic purpose and that's really key also 00:49:08 because it's not just that we're learning deciding and adapting willy-nilly i mean i mean maybe it seems that way in the world you know in the sense we're so dysfunctional it kind of is billy nilly but 00:49:20 but what really matters is that we learn decide and adapt in relation to whatever intrinsic purpose we actually have as as a society as individuals in a 00:49:34 society it's that it's it's it's it's as i will use the the term uh maybe several times today it's solving problems that matter that really that really 00:49:45 matter that's what we're after

      Second Proposition: The six thrusts or prmary societal systems are the cognitive architecture of the superorganism which it uses to sense the world

  16. May 2022
    1. "I didn't fully understand it at the time, but throughout my time as a freshman at Boston College I've realized that I have the power to alter myself for the better and broaden my perspective on life. For most of my high school experience, I was holding to antiquated thoughts that had an impact on the majority of my daily interactions. Throughout my life, growing up as a single child has affected the way am in social interactions. This was evident in high school class discussions, as I did not yet have the confidence to be talkative and participate even up until the spring term of my senior year."

  17. Apr 2022
    1. Dr Yvette Doc #TeamGP #StrengthenPrimaryCare [@DrYvetteDocGP]. (2022, January 3). I am a full-time GP with 2 children of primary school age, one who is clinically vulnerable Unless the situation with schools changes to provide a safe place for education, I am considering a career break to home school my children @nadhimzahawi @sajidjavid @NHSEngland [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/DrYvetteDocGP/status/1478100504039280646

  18. Feb 2022
    1. the telling of oppressive history can make people uncomfortable. One common argument against incorporating the history of enslaved people, she says, is that, due to the scarcity of primary sources, the history is difficult to tell meaningfully and accurately. But, Rose explains, "resistance to interpreting slavery is not about scarcity of documentation." Rather, using the supposed scarcity of documentation to excuse engagement is a form of resistance, as are denial, sarcasm, and apathy.

      The scarcity of primary sources making it difficult to tell meaningful and accurate history is a common argument against incorporating the history of enslaved people. These excuses as well as denial, sarcasm, and apathy are used to erase the value of these people and our shared history.

  19. Jan 2022
    1. Testament of Pietrobono Burzelli

      This is his will- This is so cool!

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  20. Nov 2021
    1. e Netherlands and analyzingtest scores on externally standardized tests, the studyreports a learning loss of 3.16 percentiles on a com-posite index of math, reading, and spelling, an effectthat varies in size by socioeconomic background andschool composition

      the Netherlands and analyzingtest scores on externally standardized tests, the studyreports a learning loss of 3.16 percentiles on a com-posite index of math, reading, and spelling, an effectthat varies in size by socioeconomic background andschool composition

  21. Oct 2021
    1. Meuris, C., Kremer, C., Geerinck, A., Locquet, M., Bruyère, O., Defêche, J., Meex, C., Hayette, M.-P., Duchene, L., Dellot, P., Azarzar, S., Maréchal, N., Sauvage, A.-S., Frippiat, F., Giot, J.-B., Léonard, P., Fombellida, K., Moutschen, M., Durkin, K., … Darcis, G. (2021). Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 After COVID-19 Screening and Mitigation Measures for Primary School Children Attending School in Liège, Belgium. JAMA Network Open, 4(10), e2128757. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.28757

  22. Sep 2021
  23. Jun 2021
    1. In Miss S. class, I remember there were two boys who were nice to me, J___ and— what's his name? Sorry. I still know him. He's still a good friend of mine. O___. They both kind of spoke Spanish, so they kind of helped me out as well, but I wasn't allowed to speak to anyone. The teacher was not having it … She was extremely strict. I think she was the kind of teacher that should not have ever taken up teaching as a job because some people just don't have the vocation. Is that the word in English? They don't have that in them and I don't think she had it, but they helped out a lot. J___ and Osvaldo, thank you wherever you are now. I know O___ is getting married soon, so yes.

      Time in US - Fitting in - making friends - primary education

    2. Yes, [Chuckles] very sarcastic. Did not speak a lick of Spanish. Not one sentence. I don't think she knew how to pronounce anything, and she was as WASP [White Anglo-Saxon Protestant] as you can get. This woman would get extremely frustrated with me—extremely—and I didn't know what was going on. To me, it was a completely … [Disgusted sound] it was mind-boggling how I could go from—I knew how to read and write in Spanish. I was a pretty smart kid. I knew how to read and write in Spanish at six years old. So I go into first grade and I can't even understand what my teachers are saying, so it was extremely frustrating and this teacher found it extremely frustrating as well, so she would lay me down face down half the day on the magic carpet where she would read stories to everyone because she didn't want to deal with it anymore. I told my mom—

      Time in the US - education - primary school - learning English -

  24. May 2021
  25. Apr 2021
  26. Mar 2021
  27. Feb 2021
  28. Jan 2021
  29. Nov 2020
    1. Primary buttons should be used in situations where the user may want to go ‘next’, ‘complete’, ‘start’, etc.
  30. Oct 2020
    1. One of the primary tasks of engineers is to minimize complexity. JSX changes such a fundamental part (syntax and semantics of the language) that the complexity bubbles up to everything it touches. Pretty much every pipeline tool I've had to work with has become far more complex than necessary because of JSX. It affects AST parsers, it affects linters, it affects code coverage, it affects build systems. That tons and tons of additional code that I now need to wade through and mentally parse and ignore whenever I need to debug or want to contribute to a library that adds JSX support.
    1. The primary motivation behind virtual-dom is to allow us to write code independent of previous state. So when our application state changes we will generate a new VTree. The diff function creates a set of DOM patches that, based on the difference between the previous VTree and the current VTree, will update the previous DOM tree to match the new VTree.

      annotation meta: may need new tag: for: "code independent of previous state."

      annotation meta: may need new tag: for: diffs other than source/text code diffs (in this case diffs between virtual DOM trees)

  31. Sep 2020
  32. Aug 2020
  33. Jul 2020
    1. Fontanet, A., Grant, R., Tondeur, L., Madec, Y., Grzelak, L., Cailleau, I., Ungeheuer, M.-N., Renaudat, C., Pellerin, S. F., Kuhmel, L., Staropoli, I., Anna, F., Charneau, P., Demeret, C., Bruel, T., Schwartz, O., & Hoen, B. (2020). SARS-CoV-2 infection in primary schools in northern France: A retrospective cohort study in an area of high transmission. MedRxiv, 2020.06.25.20140178. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.06.25.20140178

  34. May 2020
    1. Yong, S. E. F., Anderson, D. E., Wei, W. E., Pang, J., Chia, W. N., Tan, C. W., Teoh, Y. L., Rajendram, P., Toh, M. P. H. S., Poh, C., Koh, V. T. J., Lum, J., Suhaimi, N.-A. M., Chia, P. Y., Chen, M. I.-C., Vasoo, S., Ong, B., Leo, Y. S., Wang, L., & Lee, V. J. M. (2020). Connecting clusters of COVID-19: An epidemiological and serological investigation. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, S1473309920302735. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30273-5

    1. Zhu, Y., Bloxham, C. J., Hulme, K. D., Sinclair, J. E., Tong, Z. W. M., Steele, L. E., Noye, E. C., Lu, J., Chew, K. Y., Pickering, J., Gilks, C., Bowen, A. C., & Short, K. R. (2020). Children are unlikely to have been the primary source of household SARS-CoV-2 infections [Preprint]. Epidemiology. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.03.26.20044826

  35. Apr 2020
  36. Feb 2020
    1. If immediate admission is not possible, start emergency treatment in primary care

      1) lie flat

      2) pilocarpine drops

      • 2% in blue eyes
      • 4% in brown eyes

      3) acetazolamide 500 mg orally

  37. Sep 2019
    1. Signaling triggers an extensive rearrangement of receptors and cytoskeletal changes that culminate in the establishment of a transient cell polarity with the assembly of a specialized structure, known as the immunological synapse (

      The use of the term polarity has been confusing. But, it appears that the homology can be retined

  38. Mar 2019
    1. The Relationship of Study Anxiety and Academic Performance The Pearson correlation examines the relationship between study anxiety and academic performance. The result show mean and standard deviation of STAI (M=95.53; SD=12.008) and GPA (M=2.18; SD=0.250), a significant correlation (p=0.000), the correlation coefficient is small with r=-.264, and finally the sample size yield n=205.Study anxiety is negatively related to academic performance with a Person correlation coefficient was small. Nonetheless, the result proven that students who have high anxiety levels achieve low academic performance with anxiety level > 95 and academic performance < 2.50. Therefore, it can be concluded that there is a significant relationship between high level anxiety and low academic performance among engineering students. Consistently result with previous studies found a negative correlation between high levels of anxiety and low academic performance (Soler, 2005 and McCraty, 2007). In otherwise, El-Anzi (2005) describes a positive relationship between high degrees of academic achievement and low anxiety. Small of coefficient correlation is linked with the small of sample size yield seventy participants. Others expressed the opinion that the high level of anxiety will be associated with low academic performance (Luigi et al., 2007, and Sena et al., 2007). The finding support with McCraty (2000) where anxiety plays significant role in student's learning and academic performance, moreover it was revealed that a high facilitating achievement anxiety was related to low debilitating achievement anxiety. Similar statement cites to support the finding a fair number of engineering students that there are many situations which it is appropriate and reasonable to counter with some anxiety. That they may not find jobs in the future, express these feelings with ambivalence, confusion, lack of confidence and worry (Ercan et al., 2008). Researchers generally agree that high level anxiety will construct of low academic performance. Table 4 present the finding as follows
    2. Procedure The test aimed to find the relationship of study anxiety and academic performance among engineering students. Immediately participants giving a test, testing also aims to select trainees who have been identified in high anxiety and low academic performance were to participate in this training. The participants came to the lab and fill in the questionnaire include the S-Anxiety scale (STAI Form Y-1) and T-Anxiety scale (STAI Form Y-1). The STAI has 40 items of question and took approximately 20 minutes to complete. The students first read and answered if they had problems the researcher will guide students to answer the questions. This test was based on the faculty, after two weeks who have high levels of anxiety and low academic performance were offered to participate in this study. Result of the test was used to find out correlation between anxiety and academic performance.

      The authors explain the steps and procedures of the study and gives information about the way the research experiment will be executed. This is primary evidence as it is new information formulated and analysed by the authors to generate useful outcomes.

    Tags

    Annotators

  39. Dec 2018
  40. www.lexisnexis.com www.lexisnexis.com
    1. Primary SourcesA document that establishes the law on a particular issue, such as a case decision or legislative act
  41. Nov 2018
    1. Two of the principles underlying generalism,whether in the form of internal medicine, pediatrics,or family medicine, have been comprehensivenessand continuity.7,8 Ideally, the primary care physicianwould provide all aspects of care, ranging from pre-ventive care to the care of critically ill hospitalizedpatients. This approach, argued the purists, wouldresult in medical care that was more holistic, less frag-mented, and less expensive.9 To its proponents, thenotion was so attractive — the general internist ad-mits the patient to the hospital, directs the inpatientworkup, and arranges for a seamless transition backto the outpatient setting — that questioning it wouldhave seemed sacrilegious merely a few years ago
  42. Jul 2018
    1. http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf

      I prefer sources that are short and to the point, with links allowing me to explore various topics if  I need to.  This piece goes over all of the basics of creating and maintaining a copyright license. While that is not the objective, typically, of someone taking a Creative Commons course, it helps to see this information from a pro-copyright perspective to understand all sides of the issue.

      It's also a primary source, meaning that the department issuing the copyrights in the United States also wrote this piece, which means it should be as accurate as possible.

  43. Mar 2018
    1. Mention has been made of the new environmental body. Strictly speaking, under this clause as it currently stands, the Government would be able to establish, under secondary legislation, the kind of body that the noble Lord, Lord Krebs, who is no longer in his place, was arguing for earlier—a body so powerful it could sanction other public bodies, including the Government, if it was able to reproduce the powers that presently rest with the European Commission. That is an enormous power, which this House would not allow the Executive arm of government on its own without primary legislation conducted through the two Houses.

      interesting point

  44. Mar 2017
    1. [F19127ff.]

      Attached is a pdf scan of the full report on prepared by Snow and Rosenberg. Characterizing the effect of oil and oil-product spills on surrounding life is an ongoing area of research. Other annotations more adequately cover this topic. [(http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/14960.pdf)]

  45. Dec 2016
    1. The Viet Nam era draft card is also known by its legal description, the status card. The draft card was an aspect of the Selective Service Act, the federal legislation that legalized the conscription of eligible males into the American armed services during the Viet Nam war (1962–1973).

      Vietnam Card Burning (PRIMARY PICTURES)

  46. Nov 2016
    1. The compact was drafted to prevent dissent amongst Puritans and non-separatist Pilgrims who had landed at Plymouth a few days earlier.
    1. It has been seen nowadays in almost all the cities and countries that internet has taken the primary positions of almost all the things for human beings. The Internet is one of the most important priorities of an individual whether he/she is a kid, a younger or an elderly. Hence, the children of today also enjoy the internet and have made the internet as the most important thing for them. Kids like to study on the internet and even parents also want their children to study through the internet as the internet has the best options available for studies.http://blog.selectmytutor.co.uk/11-educational-websites-for-primary-school-children/

  47. Oct 2016
    1. Bird-Dogging

      Bird-dogging is a technique whereby activists get candidates on the record about their position on an issue. The term comes from the analogy of a bird-dog which flushes birds out of hiding. In the metaphor, candidates for office often want to conceal their positions on controversial issues or keep their language around them vague. Bird-doggers go to events and ask carefully crafted questions on issues they wish to talk about to try to "flush a candidate's opinions into the open."

      Bird-doggers often work in issue advocacy organizations, and are less concerned about who wins an election than about getting their issues addressed as part of the campaign.

      The term was popularized in 2004 by New Hampshire Quaker activist Arnie Alpert who noted that the way people were asking questions at "town halls" with presidential candidates was allowing the candidates too much wiggle room:

      "If you simply go in there and say, ‘What do you think about health care? What do you think about Iraq?’ the candidate can pretty much say anything and have it sound like it’s a good answer,” said Arnie Alpert, the program coordinator in New Hampshire for the American Friends Service Committee, a Quaker group.

      So in the lead-up to the 2004 primary, he started teaching people how to ask questions. Basically, it takes planning, precision and a little bit of courage. (see New York Times story)

      Albert's techniques were later adopted by Priorities NH, a Ben Cohen (of Ben and Jerry's) group trying to get military spending issues addressed, as well as other groups in the 2008 primary. The rise of citizen video made such techniques an important tool of activism.

      Controversy

      Rhetoric around a 2016 controversy created by James O'Keefe wrongly portrayed bird-dogging as a Clinton campaign term dealing with the instigation of violence at Trump rallies. The term pre-dates the Clinton campaign and has never been used in this way.

      Sources

      New York Times Article: Bird-Dogging in N.H. and Iowa, March 2007

      From the 2016 book Service Sociology and Academic Engagement in Social Problems: "Bird-dogging means attending a political candidates public appearances with the specific aim of challenging or seeking clarification of a particular issue."

      From 2011 book The Young Activist's Guide to Building a Green Movement and Changing the World: "Bird-dogging refers to attending public events where a candidate for public office or an elected representative will appear and calling on him or her to publicly address an issue, support your cause, or reconsider a stance already taken."

    1. In Wall-E and the Toy Storytrilogy, the pleasure is of the suspen-sion of knowledge—the pleasure of notknowing.
    2. One of the distinct pleasures in Pixar’s films is the pleasure of seeing the deepest of human struggles, timeless philosophical questions projected in and through remote forms of representation.
    3. in an effort to engineer Buzz “getting lost” behind the desk so that Andy will take Woody on his expedition to Pizza Planet, Woody ends up accidentally pushing Buzz out the window

      Woody shows his insecurities about being left out or left behind

    4. Stanley Cavell, in dis-cussing Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night (1934), hints at how internaliza-tion of censorship can lead to a flouting of censorship’s very purposes through parody
    5. (Wall-E and the Toy Story trilogy [1995, 1999, 2010]) expand the limitations that have traditionally bound “family enter-tainment” under the G-rating by em-ploying a postmodern adaptation of the “principle of deniability,” a producer-designed multivalence that flourished in Hollywood from 1930–1968 under the Production Code (Vasey 104–13).
    6. Pixar’s Toy Story (Dir. John Lasseter, 1995) and WALL-E (Dir. Andrew Stanton, 2008) are “innocent” animated film about ob-jects, their value as cinema lies in their ability to complexly address human—and sometimes wholly adult—fears about meaninglessness, apocalypse, and oblivion.