18 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2020
  2. Sep 2020
    1. This dynamic is playing out during the pandemic among the many people who refuse to wear masks or practice social distancing.

      Many people say they care for each other but when it comes to a pandemic that many think is a hoax, they don't care for the health of others. Even if it is a hoax, wouldn't you still be careful?

  3. Aug 2020
  4. Jul 2020
  5. Jun 2020
    1. Goldman, P. S., Ijzendoorn, M. H. van, Sonuga-Barke, E. J. S., Goldman, P. S., Ijzendoorn, M. H. van, Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., Bradford, B., Christopoulos, A., Cuthbert, C., Duchinsky, R., Fox, N. A., Grigoras, S., Gunnar, M. R., Ibrahim, R. W., Johnson, D., Kusumaningrum, S., Ken, P. L. A., Mwangangi, F. M., Nelson, C. A., … Sonuga-Barke, E. J. S. (2020). The implications of COVID-19 for the care of children living in residential institutions. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2352-4642(20)30130-9

  6. May 2020
  7. May 2015
    1. Or more plainly: attention on social media both compensates for and is the logical endpoint of commoditized care work.

      I don't fully understand this but it was the most intriguing sentence in the piece for me. Are our social media services doing the care work of attending to our need for in-control socialization? Are they our new safe spaces that replace the therapist's office? I also wonder about whether people who work in a caring capacity have a unique relationship with social media.