28 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. By submitting, posting or displaying Content on or through the Services, you grant us a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license (with the right to sublicense) to use, copy, reproduce, process, adapt, modify, publish, transmit, display and distribute such Content in any and all media or distribution methods now known or later developed (for clarity, these rights include, for example, curating, transforming, and translating). This license authorizes us to make your Content available to the rest of the world and to let others do the same.
  2. Aug 2020
    1. Additional Resources

      I suggest an additional section titled tools. These tools really helped me in gaining a better understanding of structuring attributions etc.

      The Attribution Builder is really helpful when there is uncertainty as to how to proceed with citing sources, especially as citing CC Licenses seems different from scholarly practices.

      1. Open Attribution Builder, by WA SBCTC, [n.d.]. The Open Attribution Builder is licensed under CC BY 4.0.
      2. CC “Select your License” tool logic - Beta version, by Wyblib40, 2020. Licensed under CC BY 4.0. (Please note that this workflow logic diagram I created myself in order to get a feel for the new License Chooser tool (2020)

      CC “Select your License” tool logic - Beta version

    2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/License_compatibility

      Useful article that outlines how incompatible licensing can occur, despite original best intentions of the creators. Also demonstrates how time consuming and problematic it can be to resolve. (June 2020 cohort CC Cert)

      Note: article needs to be hyperlinked.

    1. Understanding Open Access: When, Why, & How to Make Your Work Openly Accessible

      This resource is one that I have already passed on to colleagues, I found it very helpful from the outset. I feel it clearly explains some of the key information to discuss with authors when considering Open Access publishing, especially when addressing common questions, such as "why should I publish OA?".

    1. More information about copyright concepts

      Additional Resource: I would like to recommend adding:

      Is it possible to decolonize the Commons? An interview with Jane Anderson of Local Contexts

      https://creativecommons.org/2019/01/30/jane-anderson/

      This interview expands on TK (traditional knowledge) labels and Cultural Heritage. The interview came about after a panel the CC Global Summit, where the panelists discussed "the need for practical strategies for Indigenous communities to reclaim their rights and assert sovereignty over their own intellectual property.".

    1. Additional Resources

      Additional Resource: I would like to recommend adding:

      Editorial: Open for Business - why The Library in the Lead Pipe in moving to CC-BY licensing

      http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2014/open-for-business/

      A library specific example of how an Open Access journal changed their licensing practices for contributed articles, this outlines why and how they made these changes.

    2. 3 Steps for Licensing Your 3d Printed Stuff by Michael Weinberg

      I found this to be a very interesting article, exploring the line between copyright and licensing of physical objects vs. the code (or digital file) used to create the object. This paper delves into a range of questions - what is being licensed, what is copyrightable, what is covered under a patent, what is a creative work, what is a functional work. Although this paper was published in early 2015, the content remains relevant now. (June 2020 Cohort CC Certificate)

    1. More information about the Commons

      Additional Resource: I would like to recommend adding:

      How Creative Commons works, and why it enables access to knowledge by Denise Rosemary Nicholson (author) and Paul G West (contributor)

      https://theconversation.com/how-creative-commons-works-and-why-it-enables-access-to-knowledge-125895

      Clear & accessible description of CC and relevance to knowledge, and this article also demonstrates how CC is impacting legal changes to Copyright in other counties ( e.g. South Africa).

  3. Jul 2020
  4. Apr 2020
    1. More information on the CC license compatibility chart https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/Wiki/cc_license_compatibility

      The compatibility chart is an excellent resource for visually identifying the scope of resuse. Most importantly, this chart shows the product of remixing licenses. This is another resource that will be employed for future reference.

    1. Programming languages and operating systems Stanford CoreNLP is written in Java; recent releases require Java 1.8+. You need to have Java installed to run CoreNLP. However, you can interact with CoreNLP via the command-line or its web service; many people use CoreNLP while writing their own code in Javascript, Python, or some other language. You can use Stanford CoreNLP from the command-line, via its original Java programmatic API, via the object-oriented simple API, via third party APIs for most major modern programming languages, or via a web service. It works on Linux, macOS, and Windows. License The full Stanford CoreNLP is licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 or later. More precisely, all the Stanford NLP code is GPL v2+, but CoreNLP uses some Apache-licensed libraries, and so our understanding is that the the composite is correctly licensed as v3+.
  5. Jan 2020
  6. Nov 2019
  7. Oct 2019
    1. Project Management for Instructional Designers

      Ironically this book is licensed "non-commercial." I personally like that license but after years of folks arguing against that license, I would love to hear the rationale behind it.

  8. Aug 2019
    1. Our icons are free for everyone to use. Please don’t try to sell them.
    1. https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/Wiki/cc_license_compatibility

      This is still the most helpful visual I have seen thus far to help explain and clarify compatibility of CC licenses.

  9. May 2019
    1. NDEx lets you specify Licenses and Request DOIs for your networks to include in grant proposals or publications thus enabling papers to link directly to your data.
  10. Mar 2019
  11. Oct 2018
  12. Feb 2018
    1. By default, all public contributions (annotations) made with the Hypothes.is open annotation tool are dedicated to the public domain via the CC0 Public Domain Dedication. Hypothes.is' TOU covers this policy in more detail

      The CC team was key in this decision of ours. This gh issue was where the discussion happened. https://github.com/hypothesis/h/issues/1257#issuecomment-57957198

  13. May 2017
  14. Mar 2015
    1. While I'm sure Red Hat's salesforce doesn't love competing with its copycat, the reality is that sales are almost certainly helped in accounts that only want RHEL for production servers and can shave costs by using CentOS for development and test servers. CentOS, in other words, gives Red Hat a lot of pricing leverage, without having to lower its prices.

      test ve development da kullanılabilir

  15. May 2014
    1. MIT-licensed

      It's stored in a [COPYRIGHT](https://github.com/gittip/aspen-python/blob/master/COPYRIGHT) file rather than a LICENSE one, but it's well licensed, all the same. :)

  16. Feb 2014