12 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2020
    1. When you’re implementing a bad plan yourself, instead of having a mentor bail you out by fixing it, a few really useful things happen:You learn many more details about why it was a bad idea. If someone else tells you your plan is bad, they’ll probably list the top two or three reasons. By actually following through, you’ll also get to learn reasons 4–1,217.You spend about 100x more time thinking about how you’ll avoid ever making that type of mistake again, i.e., digesting what you’ve learned and integrating it into your overall decision-making.By watching my mistakes and successes play out well or badly over the course of months, I was able to build much more detailed, precise models about what does and doesn’t matter for long-term codebase health. Eventually, that let me make architectural decisions with much more conviction.

      There's a benefit to embarking on a challenge without a more experienced authority to bail you out.

      • You learn many more details about why it's a bad idea.
      • The lessons you learn in terms of how to avoid the mistakes you made stick with you longer

      (I would add that the experience is more visceral, it activates more modalities in your brain, and you remember it much more clearly.)

      These types of experiences result in what the author calls more "detailed, precise models". For me they result in a sort of intuition.

  2. Oct 2020
    1. but they should be engaging, because this leads to students beingmore motivated to learn and succeed.The possibilities of how students interact with content and with each other are greatly expanded in a hybrid course; just having themread articles online and then meet to discuss themin-class, for example, takes no real advantage of a class format that can otherwise be a transformative experience.

      This article, published by the College of DuPage, gives an introduction to hybrid learning environments. The authors outline the benefits of hybrid learning, how to utilize time wisely, the student experience (both in person and online), and how to structure and plan hybrid courses.

      Rating: 6/10

  3. Sep 2020
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  7. Nov 2018
    1. Adult Graduate Student VoicesGood and Bad Learning Experiences

      This article reviews a longitudinal study of graduate students in a Master's degree program that collected both good and bad learning experiences. The comments collect from the participants resulted in themes that were repeated throughout all three years of comments. The comments were compiled to and reviewed to determine adult student perspectives on the learning process. The authors noted that their is a need to balance suppor of students with challenging students. This is a ground work of student perspective and requires further investigation to implement appropriate changes and then review student perspective after the changes.

      Rating: 7/10

  8. Sep 2018
    1. A bit of a personal connection here, but I participate in activities such as these! I recently started my own fanart blog and the feedback I've received boosted my confidence in my art! It also pushed me to improve my technique and learn new styles!

      There's a huge difference between drawing art for a blog and for education. When you're drawing for your blog, it's up to you to push yourself to learn and whatnot. In a way, it's easier to do because you get to choose what you learn, but it's also a nonlinear type of learning. While a professor will typically push you on a linear path on what skills to learn.

  9. Sep 2016
    1. design this class, I found I was seeking an experience of learning

      Just highlighting and annotating the obvious, lest we forget. There is so much of design = pathway to objectives that I want to linger over, signal boost, Mia's fundamental point: design = the learning experience. A crucial distinction.

  10. Jul 2016
    1. Large lecture classes may go through the content too quickly for the typical student to understand. That's why so many schools follow the practice of breaking the class cohort into smaller sections led by teaching assistants.