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    1. This is a great time to individualize instruction and have students work at different paces. You don’t want 100-120 papers coming at you all at one time. Spread it out, and it will keep you from getting short-tempered with your students.

      As the educational system operates today, many teachers easily put in 60 hours of work per week. But when you teach remotely, it sounds like work becomes much more manageable.

      Do I want to become a teacher? If I can teach like this I do—and no, not because it seems easier but because it seems easier AND more effective.

    2. For my more advanced students, they need to learn research skills: how to locate, evaluate, and use information. Online learning offers great opportunities for that, including with what’s going on in the news right now.

      ...how to function independently in the world too.

    3. Then there is the option of getting students to talk to each other online on discussion boards and videoconferences. Some students adapt to it quickly and like it. Some don’t, because it feels impersonal. You have to be patient with that and give them some time and space to adjust.

      Introverts v extroverts. Oil and water. They've always differed, always will. Maybe this virtual, personalized learning movement will finally allow introverts to stop feeling so defeated in the presence of extroverts who live so much more loudly than they do. Finally, they'll be able to live peacefully in their own mind, undisturbed by the stress of feelings like you need to be more extroverted to fit in.

      Btw: I'm not encouraging each party to distance themselves from each other all the time. What I am saying is that when value is trying to be distributed, distribute it however it'll best be received. Then, later, once teaching time is over, they can socialize in traditional ways... IF that's what they want to do.

    4. Rizga: How have you been translating this online?Moore: It depends on the student. Some students work very well asynchronously. They are very comfortable working alone on a draft; I make color-coded comments in a word document or their PDF, and then I send it back. Some students need me to explain things to them in person before I send them the comments; we’ll do a video or audio chat. Others need even more interaction: I’ll hook them up to a videoconference, and we’ll go through all the comments together. Some students I need to refer to a grammar-brushup program or a YouTube video on how to do some of the mechanical stuff like uploading papers online.

      Sounds like Mrs. Moore deserves a raise! This woman knows what's up! She represents the future while living in a community that (probably) latches on to tradition.

      Any of you big city school systems reading this? If you are, hire her. You can probably pay her less than what your other teachers are earning and still give her a bump in pay compared to what she's earning in Mississippi.

    5. The other big issue is that many of the teachers don’t have the skills to teach online.

      Sorry, but this begs the question...

      Should teachers who don't have the skills to teach online be teaching at all? If they can't, they're either not qualified for the job or they're unwilling to put in the effort required to learn.

    6. Then, you have to think about accessibility issues. How will my vision-impaired and deaf students access it? Have I put everything in print? Do I have to put in some audio? There are whole series of checks you have to do for different access issues.

      Sure, new problems will surface. But so will solutions. And hopefully, in the end, there will be fewer problems using the new approach than the old.