27 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
  2. Sep 2018
    1. But if you have, and still can shake hands with the murderers, then are you unworthy the name of husband, father, friend, or lover, and whatever may be your rank or title in life, you have the heart of a coward, and the spirit of a sycophant.

      Paine is appealing here to his reader's sense of independence and manhood. What might this indicate about eighteenth-century ideas about gender roles?

    1. and have no other preliminaries to settle with the reader, than that he will divest himself of prejudice and prepossession, and suffer his reason and his feelings to determine for themselves ; that he will put on, or rather that he will not put off the true character of a man, and generously enlarge his views beyond the present day.

      Paine assumes here that his reader is male, and associates an openness of thought with being "manly."

    1. ducators being conscious of power dynamicsin the classroom, as well as the importance of seeing oneself as group mem-ber and a group leader, just as a bass player contributes to the foundationof the music and plays a role as a one of the musicians

      See glossary of group member roles from week one reading.

  3. Apr 2018
    1. Mr. Collins was only a clergyman

      Being a clergymen as a living meant a guaranteed income and home for the lifetime of the clergyman lucky enough to be appointed to one. Since the incumbent did not receive a wage or sully his hands with works per se, it was considered a gentlemanly profession and many younger sons of gentlemen pursued the church as their career."

      (Grace, Maria. Vicars, Curates, and Church Livings. Random Bits of Fascination. Web.)

    1. Asshewroteshefeltsomepower(rememberwearedealingwiththemostobscuremanifestationsofthehumanspirit)readingoverhershoulder,andwhenshehadwritten'Egyptiangirls',thepowertoldhertostop.Grass,thepowerseemedtosay,goingbackwitharulersuchasgovernessesusetothebeginning,isallright;thehangingcupsoffritillaries--admirable;thesnakyflower--athought,strongfromalady'spen,perhaps,butWordsworthnodoubt,sanctionsit;but--girls?Aregirlsnecessary?YouhaveahusbandattheCape,yousay?Ah,well,that'lldo.Andsothespiritpassedon.

      Here, Orlando is being interrogated by a figurative manifestation of the spirit of the age while she trying to write. The figure questions her writing and the appropriability of writing about things that go against the accepted thoughts and opinions of the time period. Once the figure realizes that she has a husband, it leaves her alone. This section of the Chapter is essentially calling attention to how, although she is now married, Orlando still feels the same when it comes to her writing. She questions what the age would approve of her marriage and, in the end, decides that she does not feel the need to submit to the standards of the age. This idea can be closely associated with the theme of identity and gender because we see that Orlando is trying to navigate through her role as a married woman at the time. I find this passage to be interesting because in the beginning of Chapter 5, Orlando felt a strong pressure to conform to the standards of the age which resulted in buying a marriage ring for herself. But in this Chapter, she no longer feels pressured to adhere to those standards.

  4. Feb 2018
    1. 'An lá nach bhféadfaim/bean o bhréagadh/nil an báire liom' (i)

      The epigraph in the book's beginning directs our attention towards the kind of image of woman we might encounter in the text. It means 'the day I can't entice a woman, I am defeated', and is attributed to 'some poet.'

      Like the book itself on a miniature scale, the epilogue is an act of selection, that speaks to a certain agenda on the part of the collector.

      Here, an idea of female as passive object and the male as questing subject trains our attention on how these roles feature in the songs.

  5. Nov 2017
    1. If you recall your LMS patent infringement history, then you'll remember that roles and permissions were exactly the thing that Blackboard sued D2L over.
    2. (At the time, Stephen Downes mocked me for thinking that this was an important aspect of LMS design to consider.)

      An interesting case where Stephen’s tone might have drowned a useful discussion. FWIW, flexible roles and permissions are among the key things in my own personal “spec list” for a tool to use with learners, but it’s rarely possible to have that flexibility without also getting a very messy administration. This is actually one of the reasons people like WordPress.

  6. Jul 2017
    1. Key Institutions and their Roles

      families and education

      families are a unit of consumption that accept the quo and reproduce inequality – children of the rich grow rich, while the children of the poor remain poor.

      education supports the existing distribution of power and wealth. maintains order, control and ensures dominant culture is passed on. reflects organization of production

  7. Mar 2017
    1. Search before death all means to eliminate all aspects of my life which I hated. Search before death all means to amplify all aspects of my life which I loved.

      Teacher roles.

    2. The teacher in front of me was also clearly in a hurry "Do you have many more copies to make? I have a class in five minutes?"

      teacher conflict teacher stress teacher panic

    3. I stood in the queue for the photocopier, looking at my watch. As time goes by.

      Time. Preparation.

    4. I stood in the queue in front of the photocopier.

      teacher roles. transmission technology

  8. Feb 2017
    1. riting as an art, not as a method of self-expression.

      Self-expression is apparently not art(?)

    2. must have a motor car.

      A move from companionship to transportation. It is not enough to be happy inside the home--she's ready to move beyond it.

    3. It is true I am a woman; it is true I am employed; but what professional experiences have I had? I

      This reminds me of Iris Young's "Five Faces of Oppression." Young argues that we often neglect to see the many faces of oppression, and that we misrepresent reality by comparing dissimilar experiences of oppression as existing under the same general umbrella of subjectivity. Anyone who experiences even one face of oppression is oppressed, but many individuals and groups experience oppression differently because they may experience different combinations of the faces of oppression. One face of oppression which often goes overlooked is "powerlessness."

      Powerlessness is a distinction between technical freedom and actual self-possession and choice. Examples Young gives are that although we are technically allowed to choose our employer, many employees are placed at the bottom of the totem pole, where they are dictated to, rather than consulted about their own work. Those who work menial jobs, for example, in which the minutia of their jobs (what to do and how to do it) are strictly controlled are powerless. In contrast, professionals such as doctors, teachers, managers, etc. are given a degree of freedom and choice about how to best go about their work, and they might even have employees working under them, whose work they get to control. This freedom gives one "respectability" in the eyes of society and one's own eyes. If someone does not have access to professionalization, they are denigrated for this lack of "respectability," by the implication that they are inferior to professionals. This, of course, becomes a vicious economic and psychological cycle.

      This system of oppression through powerlessness is what Woolf is referencing here. Although she is employed, society has denied her the freedom allotted to most literary professionals, most of whom are men. She is employed, but she is not a professional because she is denied the freedom and respectability that being a professional connotes.

    1. arguably no American woman to dale has surpassed her in na-tional and international renown.

      Arguably, indeed. Grand claims like this seem questionable to me, especially since I had never heard of Willard prior to this piece. However, that in and of itself demonstrates the historical erasure of women who were, indeed, important in their day. I'm curious whether any of you recall reading about Willard in your U.S. history textbooks, because I certainly do not, but that may have been because, as the editors point out above, the temperance movement has been largely reduced to a mockable footnote in American history.

    2. Fowler

      I don't think it was necessary to include that it was her fiance who made these decisions which destroyed so much of what she had worked for. Certainly, it adds an element of human interest, but to mention that it was her fiance seems to imply that this was largely the result of a domestic drama. I think it is important to remember that even if it had not been Fowler, he could have been replaced by literally any other man at the time and there is a fair chance that the results would have been much the same. This situation resulted from a society that denigrated and oppressed women for being women, not just for being a woman who refused to marry Fowler, in particular. It was surely an extra twist of the knife that these changes were implemented by a man she had once trusted, but we shouldn't forget that this is a system which allowed #historicalshitheads like Fowler to destroy the work of women on a whim.

    1. but this edu-cation did not include classical learning, literacy in Greek and Latin, or formal training in rhetoric, except in a few elite schools for boys destined for the univer-sity

      I do wonder what the reasoning was for this (I mean, besides the blatant "women and the lower class are too stupid to understand our Great Books and/or will lead lives that do not require a 'polite' education"). We've already read arguments that the "polite" education supposedly improved the virtues as well as the mind, right? Wouldn't all of society benefit if women and the lower class were virtuous, as much as possible?

    2. The social evils they attacked were, they claimed, so offensive to God that pious Christian women must speak out, even at risk of social censure.

      This was an excellent logical grasp at authority for women. Since they were expected to be models of morality within the family (though they were denied the authority of the pulpit or even of the home), these women were able to turn that moral authority outward to shine it on social justice issues in the name of God.

    3. women's mental and moral equality to men, which placed on them the same responsibility to combat social evils,

      I think this is key. Women were held to exacting (actually, impossible) standards regarding morality, while completely disregarded intellectually. However, restrictions on women did not stop there, but continued into a swirling confusion of contradictory stereotypes:, for example, that women are naturally inclined to corrupt men through seduction and lasciviousness, yet are also naturally innocent, naive and in need of protection. Some early feminists mistakenly began their argument for women's rights with the premise that women deserved recognition for their moral authority, while giving in to accusations that they were not as intellectually capable. This naturally left any of their arguments suspect, as they were admitting (even if only for the sake of humility) that they might not be able to match the arguments of men intellectually. By positing that men and women are equal in terms of BOTH intellect and morality, Grimke builds herself a more sturdy rhetorical platform.

  9. Sep 2016
    1. Faculty, in such contexts, demonstrate skills less apparent in conventional classroom environments. In team-based courses, faculty must serve as learning architects, mentors, and instructional scaffolders, as well as content experts and providers of feedback and evaluation.
    1. L’enseignant joue quatre rôles distincts : celui de client, qui juge l’adéquation du produit au cahier des charges, celui d’expert technique, en cas de difficulté bloquante, celui de chef d’entreprise lorsque cela s’impose et que des décisions autoritaires (concernant les coûts, les délais ou les méthodes) doivent être prises pour empêcher l’échec du projet, et enfin le rôle traditionnel de tuteur.
    2. Pour leur faciliter la tâche, lorsqu’un enseignant dispense un cours magistral, un autre enseignant est présent dans la salle et joue un double rôle : il apporte éventuellement des points de clarification à travers une formulation alternative et il n’hésite pas à poser des questions, parfois volontairement naïves, afin de désinhiber les élèves qui n’oseraient pas intervenir.

      Interesting approach. Puts the primary teacher’s roles in a new light.