7 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
    1. If the researches completed and proposed make a contribution, I shall be grateful; but I have also given full thought to possible practical applications. The socioeconomic demands of the present and the threatened socioeconomic demands of the future have led the American woman to displace, or threaten to displace, the American man in science and industry. If this process continues, the problem of proper child-rearing practices faces us with startling clarity. It is cheering in view of this trend to realize that the American male is physically endowed with all the really essential equipment to compete with the American female on equal terms in one essential activity: the rearing of infants. We now know that women in the working classes are not needed in the home because of their primary mammalian capabilities; and it is possible that in the foreseeable future neonatal nursing will not be regarded as a necessity, but as a luxury ---to use Veblen's term -- a form of conspicuous consumption limited perhaps to the upper classes. But whatever course history may take, it is comforting to know that we are now in contact with the nature of love.

      The entire last sentence seems to be foreshadow a future where men were capable of rearing children while women in the workforce would not work as they had to nurse their children. While nursing mothers still manage to juggle work and nursing, there are some compromises that need to be made. Men are certainly more involved in child-rearing, but women can be a part of the workforce while still providing. How this is related to what love is or how loving and rearing children is not explained as the entire study was used to deal with attachment and attachment disorders. Love is not only gauged on attachment, but is does seem to be the beginning of a broader idea of what love is and how it comes to be.

  2. Sep 2020
    1. so good

      (Similar to what Meredith said earlier, I think?) This is the second time this chapter that Betteredge has referred to Lady Verinder as “so good” to do something. What’s his relationship with her supposed to be? Equally mysterious? Somewhere between love, respect, attracted, and reverent? Their dynamic seems to me to be some kind of commentary on gender roles/dynamics as he worships her, is her most trusted/special servant, yet is her servant/employee whom she refers to by his first name.

  3. Jul 2020
  4. Sep 2018
    1. But if you have, and still can shake hands with the murderers, then are you unworthy the name of husband, father, friend, or lover, and whatever may be your rank or title in life, you have the heart of a coward, and the spirit of a sycophant.

      Paine is appealing here to his reader's sense of independence and manhood. What might this indicate about eighteenth-century ideas about gender roles?

    1. and have no other preliminaries to settle with the reader, than that he will divest himself of prejudice and prepossession, and suffer his reason and his feelings to determine for themselves ; that he will put on, or rather that he will not put off the true character of a man, and generously enlarge his views beyond the present day.

      Paine assumes here that his reader is male, and associates an openness of thought with being "manly."

  5. Apr 2018
    1. Asshewroteshefeltsomepower(rememberwearedealingwiththemostobscuremanifestationsofthehumanspirit)readingoverhershoulder,andwhenshehadwritten'Egyptiangirls',thepowertoldhertostop.Grass,thepowerseemedtosay,goingbackwitharulersuchasgovernessesusetothebeginning,isallright;thehangingcupsoffritillaries--admirable;thesnakyflower--athought,strongfromalady'spen,perhaps,butWordsworthnodoubt,sanctionsit;but--girls?Aregirlsnecessary?YouhaveahusbandattheCape,yousay?Ah,well,that'lldo.Andsothespiritpassedon.

      Here, Orlando is being interrogated by a figurative manifestation of the spirit of the age while she trying to write. The figure questions her writing and the appropriability of writing about things that go against the accepted thoughts and opinions of the time period. Once the figure realizes that she has a husband, it leaves her alone. This section of the Chapter is essentially calling attention to how, although she is now married, Orlando still feels the same when it comes to her writing. She questions what the age would approve of her marriage and, in the end, decides that she does not feel the need to submit to the standards of the age. This idea can be closely associated with the theme of identity and gender because we see that Orlando is trying to navigate through her role as a married woman at the time. I find this passage to be interesting because in the beginning of Chapter 5, Orlando felt a strong pressure to conform to the standards of the age which resulted in buying a marriage ring for herself. But in this Chapter, she no longer feels pressured to adhere to those standards.

  6. Feb 2018
    1. 'An lá nach bhféadfaim/bean o bhréagadh/nil an báire liom' (i)

      The epigraph in the book's beginning directs our attention towards the kind of image of woman we might encounter in the text. It means 'the day I can't entice a woman, I am defeated', and is attributed to 'some poet.'

      Like the book itself on a miniature scale, the epilogue is an act of selection, that speaks to a certain agenda on the part of the collector.

      Here, an idea of female as passive object and the male as questing subject trains our attention on how these roles feature in the songs.