499 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. fact, Woices, iSpeech and Voki can be used for the post-listening stage. You may decide, for example, to have your learners create their own Voki as a response. T

      Just additional resources for the language learners.

    2. iSpeech can be used with computers or with tablets and smart phones through the mobile apps. Voki allows you, or your students, to generate fun listening activities through the creation of avatars to represent you, a fictitious character, or your students.

      Resource for language learning environment.

  2. Oct 2020
    1. A nice hook to pull one into some of the reasons why one would want to pick up languages as well as how to do so.

      8:44 method of loci (locorum)

      10:02 Learning words in groups based on related sounds.

      11:22 Why learn languages? Motivation

      Language represents a world cultural view.

    1. One of the primary tasks of engineers is to minimize complexity. JSX changes such a fundamental part (syntax and semantics of the language) that the complexity bubbles up to everything it touches. Pretty much every pipeline tool I've had to work with has become far more complex than necessary because of JSX. It affects AST parsers, it affects linters, it affects code coverage, it affects build systems. That tons and tons of additional code that I now need to wade through and mentally parse and ignore whenever I need to debug or want to contribute to a library that adds JSX support.
    2. hyperscript is much simpler to refactor and DRY up your code than with JSX, because, being vanilla javascript, its easier to work with variable assignment, loops and conditionals.
    1. servant

      We get a lot of telling detective report type language in this passage. words like, "Infer", "Murder", "Investigation", "established', "statement", "guilty", "motive", "Inquest." Etc...

    1. I know that it is the matter of taste and a debatable thing, I find JSX and regular javascript flow operators a lot more readable than any sort of {#blocks} and directives.
    2. Yes, you cannot fully express a modern app through templates without sacrificing flexibility and code reusability.
    3. Because templates are not Turing-complete, and if they were, they would require vDOM.
    1. Language, using a schema, provides a system of abstraction enabling one to model something. Language is context sensitive & composable. With the Language tool, we craft systems of illusion, intelligence, & life.
    1. that does not mean that I am advocating the other extreme–i.e., a templating language that allows a lot of logic. I find such templating languages, especially those that allow the host programming languages to be used inside the template, to be hard to read, hard to maintain, and simply a bad choice.
  3. Sep 2020
    1. Links are just <a> elements, rather than framework-specific <Link> components. That means, for example, that this link right here, despite being inside a blob of markdown, works with the router as you'd expect
    1. You can construct both by setting other properties inside the Promise callbacks, but we have {#await} and I feel like it should be used for this, instead of special casing the logic every time.
    1. The complaint is that by choosing less powerful languages, template-based frameworks are then forced to reintroduce uncanny-valley versions of those constructs in order to add back in missing functionality, thereby increasing the mount of stuff people have to learn.
    2. In general, I'm unpersuaded by these arguments (learning curve is determined not just by unfamiliar syntax, but by unfamiliar semantics and APIs as well, and the frameworks in question excel at adding complexity in those areas).
    3. One of the arguments that's frequently deployed in favour of JSX-based frameworks over template-based ones is that JSX allows you to use existing language constructs:
    1. if the idea of using a template language makes you shudder — your fears are misplaced, but that's a topic for another day
    1. In other words, they could receive the questions, check for alignment with Don’s mind, research the answer, create a response that is like an energy-ball of information and concepts, and then enter this energy-ball into a kind of inter-density “computer” that translates the energy into the English language.

      Reminds me of the language box scenario where someone thinks they are speaking in Chinese, but there's translators doing the real work.

      Also, the idea of word processors do the same thing. We only see the front of the interface (Microsoft Word) whereas the "CODE" is running all types of procedures in the background (in dos language).

    1. Yet, this is another reason why Sanskrit seems more suitable than other languages. The strict grammar rules, syllables, and words have reduced ambiguity making the literal meaning word and sentence. This definitely reduces the percentage of abstract meanings in the language.

      I wonder how Lojban compares.

  4. Aug 2020
    1. my point is that using "into" in such a case is just as incorrect as using "inas" would be. The fact that people make mistakes doesn't change this.

      "Log in" is the only correct way to spell the verb, and the only way to be consistent with 1000s of other phrasal verbs that are spelled with a space in them.

      We don't need nor want an exception to the general rule just for "login" just because so many people have made that mistake.

    2. I'm increasingly seeing 'login' used as a verb. And to be honest, once it's normalised it will be the correct form.
    3. In a sentence like Log in as "admin", you'd never write "*inas" as one word. Same thing with "in" and "to" when they just happen to end up next to each other in a sentence.
    4. That sounds like a pretty prescriptive attitude towards the language.
    5. I don't doubt that we will soon treat the process of logging in as a figurative point of entry, meaning that log into will make full conceptual sense (cf you don't physically delve into a problem or pile into an argument, yet both are correct grammatically because they are semantically [i.e. figuratively])
    1. proscriptive, nonprescriptive

      Interesting how a word can have multiple antonyms/opposites that are "opposite" in different ways/senses:

      • proscriptive: forbid rather than prescribe
      • nonprescriptive: absence of prescribing
    1. It might be instructive to think about what it would take to create a program which has a model of eighth grade science sufficient to understand and answer questions about hundreds of different things like “growth is driven by cell division”, and “What can magnets be used for” that wasn’t NLP led. It would be a nightmare of many different (probably handcrafted) models. Speaking somewhat loosely, language allows for intellectual capacities to be greatly compressed. From this point of view, it shouldn’t be surprising that some of the first signs of really broad capacity- common sense reasoning, wide ranging problem solving etc., have been found in language based programs- words and their relationships are just a vastly more efficient way of representing knowledge than the alternatives.

      DePonySum ask us to consider what you would need to program to be able to answer a wide range of eight grade science level questions (e.g. What can magnets be used for.) The answer is you would need a whole slew of separately trained and optimized models.

      Language, they say, is a way to compress intellectual capacities.

      It is then no surprise that common sense reasoning, and solving a wide range of problems, is first discovered through language models. Words and their relationships are probably a very efficient way of representing knowledge.

    1. Lie: I felt sick, so I lay down.Here’s where it can get a bit tricky. The past tense of lie is lay, but not because there is any overlap between the two verbs. So when you say, “I lay down for a nap,” you’re actually using the verb lie, not lay, despite the way it sounds.
    1. > (square: (x: y: square x + square y) 3 7) (x: x*x)58

      This can be written up in many other forms, plus the possibility of currying deserves to be pointed out:

      $ nix repl
      nix-repl> (sq: (x: y: sq y + sq x) 2 7) (x: x*x)
      53
      
      nix-repl> (sq: (x: y: sq y + sq x)) (x: x*x)     
      «lambda @ (string):1:11»
      
      nix-repl> (sq: (x: y: sq y + sq x)) (x: x*x) 2
      «lambda @ (string):1:14»
      
      nix-repl> (sq: (x: y: sq y + sq x)) (x: x*x) 2 7
      53
      
      nix-repl> (sq: x: y: sq y + sq x) (x: x*x) 2 7   
      53
      
    1. Find Games in Your LanguageIf you're using Search in a language other than English, then your language will be shown first in the language filter control, and that control will be moved to near the top of the search page.
  5. Jul 2020
    1. Notion of reading and re-reading for "linguistic inroads," cross sections, and divergences - language captures the amorphousness of existence. It is not bounded, its referents are not bounded, it is a moving, elastic, restless thing.

    2. Words are not simple tools to be applied and used.

      To try to use words in life as uniform instruments with preconceived uses would be to use a jackhammer to repair a swiss watch.

      To repair a spider-web with one's fingers.

      Denial of atomistic picture of linguistic meaning. Real words, live words, don't work as singular referents.

      TS Eliot - words do not sit still.

    1. when some listeners hear poets read with one or more of these characteristics—slow pitch speed, slow pitch acceleration, narrow pitch range, low rhythmic complexity, and/or slow speaking rate—they hear Poet Voice.”
  6. idioms.thefreedictionary.com idioms.thefreedictionary.com
    1. By extension, a situation in which problems continue to arise faster than one is able to solve or cope with them, resulting in piecemeal, incomplete, or temporary results.
  7. Jun 2020
    1. What would be nice is if JavaScript had a built-in way to do what I can do in Ruby with:

      > I18n.interpolate('Hi, %{name}', name: 'Fred')
      => "Hi, Fred"
      

      But to be fair, I18n comes from i18n library, so JS could just as easily (and I'm sure does) have a library that does the same thing.

      Update: Actually, you can do this in plain Ruby (so why do we even need I18n.interpolate?):

      main > "Hi, %{name}" % {name: 'Fred'}
      => "Hi, Fred"
      
      main > ? String#%
      
      From: string.c (C Method):
      Owner: String
      Visibility: public
      Signature: %(arg1)
      Number of lines: 9
      
      Format---Uses str as a format specification, and returns the result
      of applying it to arg. If the format specification contains more than
      one substitution, then arg must be an Array or Hash
      containing the values to be substituted. See Kernel::sprintf for
      details of the format string.
      
         "%05d" % 123                              #=> "00123"
         "%-5s: %016x" % [ "ID", self.object_id ]  #=> "ID   : 00002b054ec93168"
         "foo = %{foo}" % { :foo => 'bar' }        #=> "foo = bar"
      

      I guess that built-in version is fine for simple cases. You only need to use I18n.translate if you need its more advanced features like I18n.config.missing_interpolation_argument_handler.

    1. If a screwed up word or phrase is useful and people like it, it becomes a word. Language nazi’s hate this - but it’s true. Dictionary writers love it because it keeps them employed.
    2. The bug won’t be fixed today…and by next week, I’ll have forgotten about it - but some time in the future, before our software “goes gold” and gets shipped out to the public - we’ll search through the entire million lines of software for the word “FIXME” - which is unlikely to appear in any other context BECAUSE it’s not a real word!

      BECAUSE it’s not a real word

    1. The aging of the population is an inexorable change that challenges governments and societies in every developed country. Based on clinical and empirical data, social isolation is found to be prevalent among elderly people, and it has negative consequences on the elderly’s psychological and physical health. Targeting social isolation has become a focus area for policy and practice. Evidence indicates that contemporary information and communication technologies (ICT) have the potential to prevent or reduce the social isolation of elderly people via various mechanisms.

      The language is technical so the audience should have similar background with the author's to understand the content.

    1. The league, which was forced to pause its season on March 12 because of the COVID-19 pandemic, released a 22-page memo detailing the plan Monday. The document stresses there’s no exact date for the start of Phase 2 or a timetable for how long it will last. Only six players will be allowed in team facilities at one time for the voluntary workouts, and no on-ice coaching or instruction is permitted. On-ice sessions will be non-contact and players will be expected to maintain physical distancing at all times. Players will be required to wear masks when entering and exiting facilities and when not able to physically distance, except for when they’re practicing/exercising.

      The language is easy to understand.

    1. “Leave the surface level and ready to plant when conditions become fit next spring,” Ferrie says. “Plan what tillage tools you will need. For strip-till or no-till, consider applying a fall burndown herbicide to have a clean field in the spring.”

      Language may be technical since the audience is industry-focused.

    1. - AAA battery- Six super disc magnets 10 mm in diameter- A brass washer 10 mm in diameter- 0.9 mm copper wire- A marker pen- Wooden battensMotor manufacturing

      Technical language is another factor as the audience is professional and industry-focused.

  8. May 2020
    1. A "tag" is a snippet of code that allows digital marketing teams to collect data, set cookies or integrate third-party content like social media widgets into a site.

      This is a bad re-purposing of the word "tag", which already has specific meanings in computing.

      Why do we need a new word for this? Why not just call it a "script" or "code snippet"?

    1. generic-sounding term may be interpreted as something more specific than intended: I want to be able to use "data interchange" in the most general sense. But if people interpret it to mean this specific standard/protocol/whatever, I may be misunderstood.

      The definition given here

      is the concept of businesses electronically communicating information that was traditionally communicated on paper, such as purchase orders and invoices.

      limits it to things that were previously communicated on paper. But what about things for which paper was never used, like the interchange of consent and consent receipts for GDPR/privacy law compliance, etc.?

      The term should be allowed to be used just as well for newer technologies/processes that had no previous roots in paper technologies.

  9. Apr 2020
    1. While Web site is still doing well in the U.S., it is all but dead in the U.K. Current Google News searches limited to U.K. publications find only about one instance of Web site (or web site) for every thousand instances of website. The ratio is similar in Australian and New Zealand publications. In Canada, the ratio is somewhere in the middle—about 20 to one in favor of the one-word form.
    1. English tends to build new compound nouns by simply writing them as separate words with a blank. Once the compound is established (and the original parts somewhat "forgotten"), it's often written as one word or hyphenated. (Examples: shoelaces, aircraft...)
    2. Web site / website seems to be somewhat in a transitional stage, being seen as an "entity" that web page hasn't reached yet. Depending on which dictionary you check you will find web site and website, but only web page, not webpage.
    3. Other languages, German for example, are notorious for very long compunds like this and this, that are made up and written as one word directly. Perhaps the way your native language deals with compounds explains your (or other authors') personal preference and sense of "right"?
    1. In mainstream press, the word "hacker" is often used to refer to a malicious security cracker. There is a classic definition of the term "hacker", arising from its first documented uses related to information technologies at MIT, that is at odds with the way the term is usually used by journalists. The inheritors of the technical tradition of the word "hacker" as it was used at MIT sometimes take offense at the sloppy use of the term by journalists and others who are influenced by journalistic inaccuracy.
    2. there's no reasonable way to communicate effectively with the less technically minded without acquiescing to the nontechnical misuse of the term "hacker"
    3. terms like "malicious security cracker" are sufficiently evocative and clear that their use actually helps make communication more effective than the common journalistic misuse of "hacker".
    4. The more easily relabeled of the two uses of the term "hacker" is the malicious security cracker: it is not only the more recent phenomenon to acquire that label, but also the one whose meaning is most easily evoked by an alternative term. This is why, when you read an article of mine that talks about malicious security crackers, I use the term "malicious security cracker"
    5. Some claim that the term has been unrecoverably corrupted, and acquired a new meaning that we should simply accept.
    1. revised the Oxford Junior Dictionary, removing words from nature such as clover, lark, pasture, and blackberry to make room for computer-related words including blog, voice-mail, chatroom, and BlackBerry (Flood, 2015; see Kesebir & Kesebir, 2017). A recent study of language in fiction, film, and popular songs has identified a cultural shift away from words related to nature beginning in the 1950s and escalating to the present day.
    2. I am increasingly concerned when I hear my colleagues refer to themselves with computer metaphors—“I don’t have the bandwidth,” “I have to boot up,” or “I need to recharge.”
    3. Our language reveals our deep underlying beliefs, our perceptions of ourselves and one another.
    1. Now, if we think of the tasks that we perform throughout the day as consuming separate "bands" of time, then the term makes perfect sense. Being "out of bandwidth" would indicate that you do not have enough unallocated "bands of time" in your day to complete the task. Using the term bandwidth to describe time maps more closely (in my opinion) to the original definition, than the current definition describing data capacity does.
    2. The question of whether or not it is "proper" is meaningless, unless you define the particular arbiter of manners who you want to defer to. There is no authority for the English language.
    3. I may be living in a bubble, but my impression is that don't understand that figurative use of bandwidth are way out of the loop.
  10. kokociel.blogspot.com