28 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. But you think sometimes about what the real world is. Just what your brain mixes together from what your senses tell you. We create the world in a lot of ways. I suppose it shouldn’t be surprising that, when we’re not being careful, we can change it.
  2. Sep 2020
    1. A final strand of the development of the prosperity gospel was the development of charismatic Pentecostal churches in America. An umbrella term for a decentralized group of churches — comprising over 700 denominations — Pentecostal churches are characterized by an emphasis on what is known as “spiritual gifts” (or charisms, from which the term “charismatic” is drawn). A worshipful Christian might experience, for example, the gift of healing, or might suddenly start speaking “in tongues.” This tradition of worship meant that, for a believer, the idea that God would manifest Himself to the faithful in concrete, miraculous ways in the here and now was more prevalent than it would be in, say, a mainline Episcopalian church. In addition, the decentralized nature of these churches also meant that individual leaders, many of whom practiced faith healing or similar practices, had a particularly strong effect on their congregations and could build up individual personal followings.

      Take a look at the potential relationship with these ideas and those described by Colin Woodard in American Nations and the overlap with Kevin Phillips' viewpoints.

  3. May 2020
  4. Nov 2019
    1. Many speakers have developed the habit of ending each sentence as though it is a question. It may be becoming increasingly common. In the wake of the Valley Girl syndrome of the 1980’s, a bad inflection habit has entered the speech pattern: Some speakers end a declarative sentence with the inflection of a question.

      This has become a major problem among millenials and GEN Z generations. It becomes habit forming and reduces the credibility and understandability of speakers.

  5. Sep 2019
    1. Objectives, Outline and Introduction for chapter on listening in the textbook

    2. explain the difference between listening and hearing understand the value of listening identify the three attributes of active listeners recognize barriers to effective listening employ strategies to engage listeners provide constructive 
feedback as a listener

      Main learning objectives of Listening Effectively in Principles of Public Speaking

  6. Feb 2019
    1. I have made no distinction in what has been said between Speaking and Writing, because tho they are talenL'i which do not always meet, yet >"'1•""�� there is no material difference between 'cm.

      I think Ong would take issue with the notion that there is no "material difference" between speaking and writing. Writing is a "technology" so to speak, and thus presents itself differently than mere thought through speaking. One can go back and edit writing, whereas orality is not so easily done.

    2. accommodate her audi­ence.

      This idea of audience centeredness is still taught today in the majority of public speaking classes.

    3. rhetorical ability is mainly a natural endowment and that one should strive for clarity lo accommodate one's audience

      When preparing to speak publicly, the speaker's first consideration should always be the audience -- all other factors, including topic, should be a product influenced by the unanticipated audience.

    1. guides to him

      Interesting that he uses "guides" here instead of "rules."

    2. Gestures

      The nonverbal aspects of public speaking are just as important as the verbal arguments.

    3. ing as a form of conversation

      Also with viewing public speaking as a conversation, there is little room to outline arguments. Your main points will come out differently each time. it is not as mechanical.

  7. Jan 2019
    1. Know yourself.

      Great talk on the subject of coaching yourself for public speaking: video here

    2. Know the difference between a good talk and a bad talk

      I believe that the single greatest factor for a decent talk is doing your homework. And the greatest difference between a decent talk and a great talk is the speaker's experience on stage.

    3. If you’re walking into a speaking gig without knowing your audience, you’re bound to fall flat and end up looking at the tops of their heads as they check their cell phones.

      This is what Pedro Salomão calls "the speaker's fault". He has a great point on millenials: if they are bored, either in a lecture or a classroom, it's the speaker's fault. No one is bored while watching the world cup or an amazing keynote.

    4. Know how to pitch.

      A great framework on pichting comes from Dan Pink on this short video.

  8. May 2017
    1. simultaneous

      Technology has changed this drastically. With the growing popularity of videos, podcast, and even radio shows, an audience doesn't even have to be in a specific setting to hear a speaker. This update in speaking access has definitely bridged the gap between writing and speaking.

  9. Mar 2017
  10. Feb 2017
  11. Jan 2017
    1. They Write best per haps who do't with the gcn-111.uc..~ so., tile and easy air of Conversation;

      It is interesting that she is claiming that the best writers are excellent, gentle speakers in smaller, private conversations while also declaring that women have no role behind the pulpit. She seems to imply both that women are naturally the best at speaking privately and conversationally, and implying that the best public speakers would be those who conduct themselves similarly, yet she clearly states that women should not speak publicly. There is some strange logical contortionism happening here.

      In previous coursework, I've read feminist theory in which the authors would work within the acceptable framework of what authority women did have in society--typically, this was religious authority (but only as lay people, not religious leaders), or in morality and gentility. Although her declaration that women "have no business with the Pulpit, the Bar or St. Stephens Chapel," perhaps she is merely trying to suggest that gentility (which women are granted by nature) should give women more authority in private relationships, rather than public ones. The argument for private authority was sometimes prioritized over the argument for public authority, with the assumption that if women were treated equally as private citizens, public equality would follow.

      Then again, the rest of this section is very black-and-white (and boring as hell) and does not seem to include any subversive plans to overthrow the patriarchy. So I might be giving her a little too much credit with this addition.

  12. Oct 2013
    1. In oratory, accordingly, the raising, lowering, or other inflection of the voice tends to move the feelings of the bearers. We try to excite the indignation of the judges in one modulation of phrase and voice (that I may again use the same term), and their pity in another, for we see that minds are affected in different ways even by musical instruments, though no words cannot be uttered by them.

      Ok, this is all fascinating stuff. Even when we speak it tends to be in some sort of music scale, or at the very least we don't speak in dissonant tones.

    1. For, not to mention how the ignorant commonly speak, we know that whole theaters and all the crowd of the circus have frequently uttered barbarous exclamations. Custom in speaking, therefore, I shall call the agreement of the educated, as I call custom in living the agreement of the good.

      accents, vernacular

    2. BY speakers, as well as writers, there are certain rules to be observed. Language is based on reason, antiquity, authority, custom. It is analogy, and sometimes etymology, that affords the chief support to reason. A certain majesty, and, if I may so express myself, religion, graces the antique.
    1. And I know not whether both exercises, when we perform them with care and assiduity, are not reciprocally beneficial, as it appears that by writing we speak with greater accuracy, and by speaking we write with greater ease

      Link between writing and speaking