10 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2018
  2. Oct 2018
    1. entropic

      This is what Edgar Orrin Klapp meant when he wrote in his 1986 Overload and Boredom: Essays on the Quality of Life in the Information Society that “meaning and interest are found mostly in the mid-range between extremes of redundancy and variety-these extremes being called, respectively, banality and noise” (). Redundancy is repetition of the same, which creates a condition of insufficient difference, while noise is the chaos of non-referentiality, or entropy. In a way, these extremes collapse into each other, in that both can be viewed “as a loss of potential … for a certain line of action at least” ().

      There is perhaps something of "the real" here, as well. Volker Woltersdorff (2012, 134) writes that: The law of increasing entropy is a concept of energy in the natural sciences that assumes the tendency of all systems to eventually reach their lowest level of energy. Organic systems therefore tend toward inertia … Freud identifies the death drive with entropy … within his theory, the economy of the death drive is to release tension."

      Adam Phillips clarifies the death drive: “People are not, Freud seems to be saying, the saboteurs of their own lives, acting against their own best interests; they are simply dying in their own fashion (to describe someone as self-destructive is to assume a knowledge of what is good for them, an omniscient knowledge of the ‘real’ logic of their lives)” (2000, 81, cf. 77).

  3. Aug 2018
  4. Jun 2018
    1. entropic

      This is what Edgar Orrin Klapp meant when he wrote in his 1986 Overload and Boredom: Essays on the Quality of Life in the Information Society that “meaning and interest are found mostly in the mid-range between extremes of redundancy and variety-these extremes being called, respectively, banality and noise” (). Redundancy is repetition of the same, which creates a condition of insufficient difference, while noise is the chaos of non-referentiality, or entropy. In a way, these extremes collapse into each other, in that both can be viewed “as a loss of potential … for a certain line of action at least” ().

      There is perhaps something of "the real" here, as well. Volker Woltersdorff (2012, 134) writes that: The law of increasing entropy is a concept of energy in the natural sciences that assumes the tendency of all systems to eventually reach their lowest level of energy. Organic systems therefore tend toward inertia … Freud identifies the death drive with entropy ... within his theory, the economy of the death drive is to release tension."

      Adam Phillips clarifies the death drive: “People are not, Freud seems to be saying, the saboteurs of their own lives, acting against their own best interests; they are simply dying in their own fashion (to describe someone as self-destructive is to assume a knowledge of what is good for them, an omniscient knowledge of the ‘real’ logic of their lives)” (2000, 81, cf. 77).

    2. the boy patiently works away at twisting his joints and loosening the body’s grip on itself

      Foster Wallace contrasts the boy's work here with working at the IRS. While both are impossible to complete, the boy's repetitive actions are working towards a spiritual goal: loosening the body's grip on itself.

    3. a desk, a chair, a pencil, some memos, some forms, an unending stream of tax returns in need of examination, and a clock.

      Collecting objects, here in an act of boredom, removes them from their function.

      Craig Dworkin wrotes Arcades in Zero Kerning: "What is decisive in collecting is that the object is detached from all its original functions in order to enter into the closest conceivable relation to things of the same kind. The relation is the diametric opposite of any utility, and falls into the peculiar category of completeness."

      The act of collecting has the potential to transform objects into a function outside of everyday utility and monotony, and fulfill a spiritual need of completeness.

  5. Nov 2017
  6. Sep 2017
    1. Every hour you spend on Facebook, Instagram, Reddit, or in another feed that pushes entertainment onto you, you lose some of that ability to go out and entertain yourself.

      This is a huge loss...

  7. Dec 2016
  8. Jul 2016
    1. The study reveals—“boredom,” “experimentation,” and “insight”—are reasons for use related to increased and decreased risk of use of other drugs.

      This study shows that teens use drugs for three reasons: BOREDOM: meaning people use drugs because they are bored. EXPERIMENTATION: people use drugs to experiment about it. INSIGHT: it makes teens understand more.

      I think this is important because when teens are bored some teens use drugs. I agree and this connects to me because marijuana does make me want to experiment more and actually make me understand or have a argument in things i do. although when boredom strikes it helps motivates more.