88 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. All of the sections and authors speak as much or as little to each other.

      This arrangement allows patterns to emerge organically. We use a similar concept in our visual gallery http://forboredom.com/gallery/

  2. Dec 2018
    1. Sound from Ocean View:

      2:30 The background sounds of the party are also not mean to be fully decoded.

    2. The Museum of Viral Memory’s House Mac, Vicki, reading User 23187425’s search queries (from I feel better after I type to you):

      Vime writes: "Visit Lot49 and read the text for yourself. As well, take the time to read the comments on Mr. Claburn's blog about user 23187425. There is a great deal of conjecture, and perhaps the beginning of an outline of who or what made these wonderfully enigmatic searches. The voice of Vicki may be more appropriate than we initially imagined." Perhaps the voice of Vicki, a robotic computer default, may be especially appropriate in reading this text due to the methodical nature of the entires (approximately every 30 seconds) or, as a commentator from Search-ID: Psychic analysis of AOL users and their search logs writes, "I think something else is going on here, though I'd have no idea how and why…". Perhaps something in the search-engine backend holds clues about this user's search history.

    3. Reading of Homer’s Iliad by Dr. Stanley Lombardo:

      Notably, this reading by Dr. Stanley Lombardo was not intended to be used when reading 'Men in Aida', but rather when reading 'Illiad'. By writing 'Men in Aida' without providing an auditory component, Melnick opens up any reading of the Illiad as corresponding to this text.

    1. find, in translation, something other than reproduction of meaning

      A common theme across multiple objects is the communication of something other than meaning, such as in works where words are not meant to be fully decoded and instead become visual objects.

    2. Perelman writes in The Marginalization of Poetry: Language Writing and Literary History: "Like Hegel, for whom the spiritual value of the classical languages was manifest even down to their grammatical elements, and like Arnold, for whom Homer represented a natural fact and a primary literary touchstone, Melnick is taking the words of Homer as a sacred given, valuing the actual sound of the greek above the meaning."

    1. We literally weren't here yesterday w8 r u kidding where do you think we were then How would I kno? In another compartment There's no lack of void. fsho......... so we weren't here yesterday evening but what did we do then?? DO?!! idk like try & remember Hmmmm do.... Honestly We were prob just txting about wut tho Nm just normal shit, nothing rlly Hold up Now I remember Yesterday evening we were txting bout nothing in partic That's been going on 4 like half a century now but like you don't remember any facts/any specs?

      Boredom - as mediated through texting - is associated with a lack of memory, an inability to retain specific memories.

    2. sooooooooooo say something Chill I'm trying ummm please say like legit anything

      Texting indicators of boredom. It's unclear whether texting relieves the boredom of waiting, or whether texting is itself compounding that boredom.

    1. the real

      Ticinovic (2000) describes the real in Underworld as sensory and human activity versus the "selective realities of capital's media - TV, video, movies, newspapers, etc." (p. 24, Master's Thesis). In this, as in many other texts, one interpretation of the real as 'god' or as 'spiritual' is a hyper-focus on the sensory rather than the mediated. This is especially notable in The Gospel According to David Foster Wallace.

    2. historical and cultural debris of the latter half of the twentieth century

      The text is composed of historical and cultural debris, although it is not drawn directly from a real-world referent (such as Day by Kenneth Goldsmith). This type of text occupies an imaginative space in between the type of conceptual work like Day and a fully fictional work. How do we categorise this kind of work? It shares features with other works that include both real and imagined information (The Dust, House of Leaves).

    3. nothing but noise.

      Ticinovic (2000, Master's thesis) suggests that the fragmentation in Underworld is "not an ahistorical postmodern pastiche of fragments, but instead represents a turn in Delillo's work towards a new spirituality or humanism, one which preserves a postmodern aesthetic of plurality and reaches beyond the sometimes banal issues of regionalism."

    4. It seems to fall apart more often than hang together.

      Underworld challenges the assumption that books are composed of one unit of cohesive information.

    1. certain legibility

      Coupland's work, in contrast to that of Jorindge Voigt and Joseph Kosuth, is physically legible.

    2. Coupland’s rather grim summation of the (perhaps not so) social experience of social media

      information about information

    1. Johnson & Johnson Bandaid Brand Adhesive Bandage, 1/2" by 3"

      Gottlieb's objects are both extremely specific (e.g. make, size, type) and universal in that they include brands familiar to many readers. The poem draws attention to the number of possible descriptors for each of our objects, even without information on a specific object's time course (i.e. from production to stocking to purchase). By contrast, Gottlieb doesn't include any additional information in the name listings.

    2. while it honors the dead, it also refuses to separate them from the things with which they lived

      In Gottlieb's poem, all written text is treated as objects.

    3. imaginative speculation

      Blending the real and the imagined. Similar to the use of both real and imagined sources in House of Leaves. As noted in an annotation on House of Leaves: "Interweaving real and made up authors could be another form of haunting. Mark Taylor describes "the real" and "god" as synonymous in Rewiring the Real. Sparsely including the real may be a way to draw attention to it."In this case, imaginative speculation can be especially ghostly - what does it mean to make up a name in this list? What does it mean to make up an object?

    4. Photo from a 2005 reading at the TARPAULIN SKY / FREQUENCY SERIES:

    5. Curiously, it was difficult to find relevant information on The Dust online because of it's literary success. Since Gottlieb frequently mentions The Dust in biography statements, I had to sift through many other works by Gottlieb.

    6. The Dust has been staged several times, such as in this 2011 version directed by Fiona Templeton. I was unable to find photographs or videos of the performances, and am curious as to how a list was transformed for the stage.

    7. Daniel C. Lewin C++ For Dummies, Stephen Randy Davis, 4th Edition, IDG Books

      Even once Gottlieb transitions to people's names, he still interweaves people's names with objects.

    8. the stock, reflexive, or scripted responses to the strongly mediated spectacle of the attacks

      One critical difference between Day and The Dust is the Day takes a mundane, everyday issue of the New York Times as it's material, while The Dust considers an emotionally loaded event. While similar in form, The Dust utilises the mundane to withhold affect and Day reprints the mundane for readers to attend to.

      Interestingly, Goldsmith later published The Day, which took a newspaper from September 11th as it's material.

    9. Coffee, regular, sesame bagel, toasted with cream cheese

      Perhaps an object of Gottlieb's imaginative speculation - a receipt?

    1. America Online (AOL)

      Having never interacted with AOL on the internet, I repeatedly confused it with IM software, like MSN and ICQ, when reading this description.

    2. User:23187425

      Artist Rob Lycett also created two works using the search queries of User 23187425. The first, AOL 23187425 24.07.2015, is a visual representation of the search queries in google images: http://www.breakingthings.info/?/draw/AOLgoogle/

      The second, 23187425 {1000 Haiku} is a poetic representation of the queries in a printed book format. http://www.breakingthings.info/?/text/haiku/

    3. User:23187425.

      Artist Rob Lycett also created two works using the search queries of User 23187425. The first, AOL 23187425 24.07.2015, is a visual representation of the search queries in google images: http://www.breakingthings.info/?/draw/AOLgoogle/

      The second, 23187425 {1000 Haiku} is a poetic representation of the queries in a printed book format. http://www.breakingthings.info/?/text/haiku/

    4. User:23187425

      The Museum for Viral Memory (http://www.vime.org/previous/user_23187425.html) recorded a number of User 23187425's search queries as sound recordings. On their website, they write: "Downloading and reading these search queries we were instantly reminded of writings by people in manic states. It was like revisiting writings we have received from friends and family suffering from the psychotic highs of manic depression. It also reminded us of the authors that we at the MVM continually rework - Samuel Beckett, Antonin Artaud and William S. Burroughs." I found it fascinating that my search into User 123187425 had led back to Beckett, who is referenced in a number of other Objects on this site.

      The Museum of Viral Memory has a UDV project which seeks to record all of Beckett's work. On their website, they describe why they chose Beckett in particular: "We chose to make my first foray into the voice the works of Beckett because hearing them is the closest thing to hearing music we have ever encountered in the spoken language. His words and the diction they demand are closer to plainchant or shape note than speech. They are also the closest thing to a transcription of the inner dialogue as we have ever encountered."

      Notably, 'plainchant' and 'shape note' are both congregational singing practices.

    5. User:23187425.

      The Museum for Viral Memory (http://www.vime.org/previous/user_23187425.html) recorded a number of User 23187425's search queries as sound recordings. On their website, they write: "Downloading and reading these search queries we were instantly reminded of writings by people in manic states. It was like revisiting writings we have received from friends and family suffering from the psychotic highs of manic depression. It also reminded us of the authors that we at the MVM continually rework - Samuel Beckett, Antonin Artaud and William S. Burroughs." I found it fascinating that my search into User 123187425 had led back to Beckett, who is referenced in a number of other Objects on this site.

      The Museum of Viral Memory has a UDV project which seeks to record all of Beckett's work. On their website, they describe why they chose Beckett in particular: "We chose to make my first foray into the voice the works of Beckett because hearing them is the closest thing to hearing music we have ever encountered in the spoken language. His words and the diction they demand are closer to plainchant or shape note than speech. They are also the closest thing to a transcription of the inner dialogue as we have ever encountered."

      Notably, 'plainchant' and 'shape note' are both congregational singing practices.

    6. User:23187425

      On the website Search-ID: Psychic analysis of AOL users and their search logs, many people speculate on this user's personality and reasons for searching for 'nothing' on AOL. The tone of messages feels closer to a one-sided Instant-Messaging conversation, and the user never actually clicks on any links that come up from the search queries. One commenter, Choronzon's Girl suggests that this user "seems to be talking both to self and to some other entity (God, the Internet, the AOL Robot Therapist?)" Another commenter suggests that AOL search is a covert channel to log a conversation, particularly because the search queries "are entered methodically every 30 seconds or so, give or take, for continuous stretches lasting several hours." Another commenter writes "I think something else is going on here, though I'd have no idea how and why..."

      This particular user is distinct from other AOL users, whose search queries are much more typical. For instance, AOL user #11496059 searched for "clearance prom dresses", "prom hair styles", "prom hair styles for medium length hair", "cute prom hairstyles", "updo hairstyles", etc.

      Comments from: http://explicit-id.com/user/23187425-homeless_joe

    7. User:23187425

      On the website Search-ID: Psychic analysis of AOL users and their search logs, many people speculate on this user's personality and reasons for searching for 'nothing' on AOL. The tone of messages feels closer to a one-sided Instant-Messaging conversation, and the user never actually clicks on any links that come up from the search queries. One commenter, Choronzon's Girl suggests that this user "seems to be talking both to self and to some other entity (God, the Internet, the AOL Robot Therapist?)" Another commenter suggests that AOL search is a covert channel to log a conversation, particularly because the search queries "are entered methodically every 30 seconds or so, give or take, for continuous stretches lasting several hours." Another commenter writes "I think something else is going on here, though I'd have no idea how and why..."

      This particular user is distinct from other AOL users, whose search queries are much more typical. For instance, AOL user #11496059 searched for "clearance prom dresses", "prom hair styles", "prom hair styles for medium length hair", "cute prom hairstyles", "updo hairstyles", etc.

      Comments from: http://explicit-id.com/user/23187425-homeless_joe

    8. America Online (AOL)

      Having never interacted with AOL on the internet, I repeatedly confused it with IM software, like MSN and ICQ, when reading this description.

    9. want miss tv had it put on basic cable did watch tv alot

      The search queries seem to follow a kind of narrative sequence where subsequent entries reference the content of previous ones. This is puzzling, because the first query has to be erased from the search bar for the second one to be typed in, so the only way the search terms would show up as a sequence are perhaps in this user's browser history. User 23187425 was slowly typing one thought at a time in methodical intervals. The act of typing these search queries, slowly, and one at a time, is similar to the slow methodical typing that Kenneth Goldsmith does of the New York Times issue for Day.

      This experience is further mediated as Thomas Claburn methodically typed User 231187425's queries.

  3. Oct 2018
    1. many of the authors cited are real and the articles and books noted have actually been published, many of the passages quoted are made up, and pages referenced are either incorrect or do not exist

      Interweaving real and made up authors could be another form of haunting. Mark Taylor describes "the real" and "god" as synonymous in Rewiring the Real. Sparsely including the real may be a way to draw attention to it.

    2. explaining his editorial procedures and adding his own observations and reflections, which are so extensive that they eventually overwhelm Zampano’s text

      Similar to the annotations in Foster Wallace's writing (footnotes on footnotes) and Jorinde Voigt's writing. The compulsion to annotate and explain is so strong, that it overwhelms the original text.

    3. House of Leaves

      House of Leaves is often described as ergodic literature, meaning that "nontrivial effort is required to allow the reader to traverse the text" (Aarseth, 1997, p. 2). Aarseth writes, "… hypertexts, adventure games, and so forth are not texts the way the average literary work is a text. In what way, then, are they texts? They produce verbal structures, for aesthetic effect. This makes them similar to other literary phenomena. But they are also something more, and it is this added paraverbal dimension that is so hard to see."

    4. nothingness haunts the text

      In Re-writing Freud by Simon Morris, words are randomly selected from Interpretation of Dreams, although "flashes of meaning persist, haunting the text."

    5. Several pages in House of Leaves, as shown in the video uploaded by Zyerah, mirror the same image on both sides of a printed page. N. Katherine Hayles writes "The box calls into question an assumption so commonplace we are not normally aware of it - that book pages are opaque, a property that defines one page as separate from another" (p. 123).

    6. Zyerah's forum response, is itself hypertextual and heavily annotated, which the author is well aware of. Zyerah writes: "Footnote 310 has footnotes of its own. Those footnotes take you to other places in the book, and now you need five bookmarks. And look, honestly, I didn't want this example to be 450 words long, but that's kind of the point, isn't it?"

      It seems that any mention of the book that isn't hypertextual (N. Katherine Hayle's relatively short chapter in Writing Machines as one such example) is an exception.

      Curiously, the original user who asked the question, BESW writes: "This is an awesome answer to a question very adjacent to the one I've asked …" where Zyerah responds: "@BESW Apologies for addressing an adjacent point! I… may have gotten a little carried away… ". This exchange highlights the compulsion that the book brings out to annotate, explain, discover hidden footnotes - and show these footnotes to people who haven't found them yet.

    7. Zyerah writes: "I've uploaded a video of me simply flipping through a tunnel in the book. With the application of a little kinesthetic thought, there's a physical sense given to the reader that this tunnel is actually inside the book. If you look at the pages as they're stacked together, you look at the wall you reach at the end of the tunnel, and you look back, and it's supposed to feel like you can look through the book.

      This isn't something that's going to be very easy to pick up on using an ebook. Ebooks make it difficult to look at past pages and think about them being a stack of pages."

    8. The converging text on the right hand side is initially readable but then slowly merges to a point where it is unable to be fully decoded.

    9. Images sourced from Google Images:

      Zyerah writes about using bookmarks in the physical book: "The sheer quantity of bookmarks - and their positions in the books - is part of the significance of the text. This is hard to reconstruct, but as you read the text, you'll quickly find that one bookmark isn't enough. Then, two. Then, three. At one point, I required seven bookmarks in order to trace my path through the text. Where are the bookmarks? The bookmarks are where you get caught, snagged on some thorn in the book's side. It's a physical indicator that confounds your perception of your own progress."

    10. Images sourced from Google Images:

      As seen from these photographs and the gif at the bottom, House of Leaves is hard to photograph or video. Many of its elements are specific to print, such as an object on one side which is mirrored on the other side of the same page.

    11. Pages 144-145.

      Katherine N. Hayles writes in Writing Machines, "Zampanò suggests this chapter should be called "The Labyrinth", a title that makes explicit what is already implicit in typgraphy, that house of leaves mirrors the House on Ashtree Lane, both of which are figured as a labyrinth, a motif already embossed in black-on-black on the cover" (p. 122).

      Shapes resembling "windows" from the house repeatedly come up in the book. On the left page, an object - seemingly a flower pot, is removed from the page.

      On the literature stack exchange, Zyerah answers a question about whether House of Leaves would function well as an e-book by providing a number of examples of the importance of the book's physical presence, although they mention that prior knowledge of how the book is supposed to work may allow it to be read in e-book form later on.

      One example that Zyerah brings up is visible on this page - the text often moves in different directions, which is very difficult to read on a computer screen. In this case, the text is read-able, but makes itself very difficult to read.

    12. —-

      Zyerah's forum response, is itself hypertextual and heavily annotated, which the author is well aware of. Zyerah writes: "Footnote 310 has footnotes of its own. Those footnotes take you to other places in the book, and now you need five bookmarks. And look, honestly, I didn't want this example to be 450 words long, but that's kind of the point, isn't it?"

      It seems that any mention of the book that isn't hypertextual (N. Katherine Hayle's relatively short chapter in Writing Machines as one such example) is an exception.

      Curiously, the original user who asked the question, BESW writes: "This is an awesome answer to a question very adjacent to the one I've asked ..." where Zyerah responds: "@BESW Apologies for addressing an adjacent point! I... may have gotten a little carried away... ". This exchange highlights the compulsion that the book brings out to annotate, explain, discover hidden footnotes - and show these footnotes to people who haven't found them yet.

    13. Several pages in House of Leaves, as shown in the video uploaded by Zyerah, mirror the same image on both sides of a printed page. N. Katherine Hayles writes "The box calls into question an assumption so commonplace we are not normally aware of it - that book pages are opaque, a property that defines one page as separate from another" (p. 123).

    14. Images sourced from Google Images:

      Zyerah writes about using bookmarks in the physical book: "The sheer quantity of bookmarks - and their positions in the books - is part of the significance of the text. This is hard to reconstruct, but as you read the text, you'll quickly find that one bookmark isn't enough. Then, two. Then, three. At one point, I required seven bookmarks in order to trace my path through the text. Where are the bookmarks? The bookmarks are where you get caught, snagged on some thorn in the book's side. It's a physical indicator that confounds your perception of your own progress."

    15. Zyerah writes: "I've uploaded a video of me simply flipping through a tunnel in the book. With the application of a little kinesthetic thought, there's a physical sense given to the reader that this tunnel is actually inside the book. If you look at the pages as they're stacked together, you look at the wall you reach at the end of the tunnel, and you look back, and it's supposed to feel like you can look through the book.

      This isn't something that's going to be very easy to pick up on using an ebook. Ebooks make it difficult to look at past pages and think about them being a stack of pages."

    16. Pages 144-145.

      Katherine N. Hayles writes in Writing Machines, "Zampanò suggests this chapter should be called "The Labyrinth", a title that makes explicit what is already implicit in typgraphy, that house of leaves mirrors the House on Ashtree Lane, both of which are figured as a labyrinth, a motif already embossed in black-on-black on the cover" (p. 122).

      Shapes resembling "windows" from the house repeatedly come up in the book. On the left page, an object - seemingly a flower pot, is removed from the page.

      On the literature stack exchange, Zyerah answers a question about whether House of Leaves would function well as an e-book by providing a number of examples of the importance of the book's physical presence, although they mention that prior knowledge of how the book is supposed to work may allow it to be read in e-book form later on.

      One example that Zyerah brings up is visible on this page - the text often moves in different directions, which is very difficult to read on a computer screen. In this case, the text is read-able, but makes itself very difficult to read.

    17. Images sourced from Google Images:

      As seen from these photographs and the gif at the bottom, House of Leaves is hard to photograph or video. Many of its elements are specific to print, such as an object on one side which is mirrored on the other side of the same page.

    18. The converging text on the right hand side is initially readable but then slowly merges to a point where it is unable to be fully decoded.

    19. House of Leaves

      House of Leaves is often described as ergodic literature, meaning that "nontrivial effort is required to allow the reader to traverse the text" (Aarseth, 1997, p. 2). Aarseth writes, "... hypertexts, adventure games, and so forth are not texts the way the average literary work is a text. In what way, then, are they texts? They produce verbal structures, for aesthetic effect. This makes them similar to other literary phenomena. But they are also something more, and it is this added paraverbal dimension that is so hard to see."

    1. want miss tv had it put on basic cable did watch tv alot

      The search queries seem to follow a kind of narrative sequence where subsequent entries reference the content of previous ones. This is puzzling, because the first query has to be erased from the search bar for the second one to be typed in, so the only way the search terms would show up as a sequence are perhaps in this user's browser history. User 23187425 was slowly typing one thought at a time in methodical intervals. The act of typing these search queries, slowly, and one at a time, is similar to the slow methodical typing that Kenneth Goldsmith does of the New York Times issue for Day.

      This experience is further mediated as Thomas Claburn methodically typed User 231187425's queries.

    1. (Waiting for-)

      Both Sophie LeFragga and Joseph Kosuth reference Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett in their works. Waiting for Godot has been interpreted as allegory for various religious and political messages, with the name 'Godot' often interpreted as 'God'. However, Beckett himself stated that "If by Godot I had meant God I would have said God, and not Godot" (Brater, 2003). He has also said, "It means what it says" (Croall, 2005), suggesting a pushback to more 'meaningful' interpretations. At the end of his novel Watt (1953), Beckett writes "no symbols where none intended."

      Beckett seems primarily concerned with existential meaning, the lack of possible meaning, and 'nothingness', rather than religiously constructed meaning. This may be a similar division to that between religious and spiritual modes of inquiry.

    2. an installation from Kosuth’s 1980’s series of installation works comprised of wall papered rooms based on the writing of Sigmund Freud

      Freud, similarly to Beckett, seems to be popular reference text for many conceptual artists. In Beckett and Freud by Raymond Riva (1970), Riva connects the works of Beckett and Freud, writing "We will see that their very basic ideas concerning men, and occasionally, even their word choice is a particular situation, is strikingly similar." (p. 120)

      "Beckett seems to be communicating in an essentially symbolic language, one which is quite capable of communication while seeming to say nothing and going nowhere. A language, moreover, which all of us learned and (more of less) have forgotten. It is, in Freudian terms, the language of our repressed and sublimated selves ... "

    3. Beckett approaches the question of meaning from the absence of meaning rather than, as Kosuth does, from questions concerned with the production of meaning

      This distinction seems to be a central theme across the objects on For Boredom. The Pale King clearly deals with the absence of meaning, while House of Leaves, with its fake footnotes and citations, deals primarily with the production of meaning. What does it mean for Kosuth to investigate the production of meaning by citing a work that deals with the absence of meaning?

    4. Waiting around for Godot results in ‘nothing’ but more language.

      Language or text mimics meaning.

    5. dipping each letter and punctuation mark in black paint which reduces legibility

      Words are no meant to be wholly decoded - connection to Jorinde Voigt's work:

    1. translation must in large measure refrain from wanting to communicate something, from rendering the sense,

      If translation is to refrain from communicating something, then is it communicating nothing?

    2. translating the sound rather than the sense

      Words as objects

    1. a single date, September 1 , 2000

      As with many other objects, Goldsmith uses a reference text to reshape and reformat the text's original meanings.

    2. —————

      Moving information into different containers and changing their spacing occurs across a number of the objects discussed in For Boredom as a way to communicate something other than meaning.

    1. 6:40

      Kibbins invents text that imitates the tone of a textbook or learning materials, suggesting the presence of meaning.

    2. 8:40

      Words are rearranged into nonsense sentences and paired with nonsense images.

    3. 8:10

      The text is obscured and not meant to be fully decoded, as in Jorinde Voigt's and Joseph Kosuth's works.

    4. 3:10

      Visual similarity to Texts (Waiting for—) for Nothing; Samuel Beckett, in play, where neon text was 'cancelled' by being dipped into black paint - reducing legibility. Here, legibility is reduced by shading and the speed and quantity of text moving through the screen.

    1. Do you do you OMG jinx Go ahead no no you go first Naaaa after u no but I interrupted you tho On the contrary I'm tired we're not in shape how about a little deep breathing I'm tired of breathing word

      Mimicking content/ information

    2. esterday evening we were txting bout nothing in partic That's been going on 4 like half a century now but like you don't remember any facts/any specs?

      Boredom associated with a lack of memory

    3. sooooooooooo say something Chill I'm trying ummm

      Texting indications of boredom

  4. Jun 2018
    1. organizational form of the list

      Listing and collecting items to put them back into their original function rather than remove them from their original function.

    2. through strategies of obliquity and indirection

      The text is about nothing.

    3. imaginative speculation rather than research

      Interweaving of real with imagined. Similar to Underworld's use of real and imaged sources.

    1. ‘nothing’ but more language

      The text is used to communicate nothing.

    2. dipping each letter and punctuation mark in black paint which reduces legibility

      Words are not meant to be wholly decoded. Connection to Jorinde Voigt's annotations.

    1. flashes of meaning persist

      Flashes of meaning persist despite an attempt to eliminate meaning. Perhaps this suggests that meaning is impossible to eradicate?

    2. making a new book with the same words

      Connection to Underworld, "hope of finding patterns where there seems to be nothing but noise".

    1. sort through the historical and cultural debris of the latter half of the twentieth century in the hope of finding patterns where there seems to be nothing but noise.

      Similar and opposite to Adam S. Miller's statement about Foster Wallace's work in The Gospel According to David Foster Wallace: "The real is full of noise, and more, it’s full of patterns that look like noise."

    2. wasted lives, wastebands, wasted bodies, limbs, sewers, dumps, landfills, junk, trash, garbage, shit
    1. many of the authors cited are real and the articles and books noted have actually been published

      Interweaving real and made up authors could be another form of haunting. Mark Taylor describes "the real" and "god" as synonymous in Rewiring the Real. Sparsely including the real may be a way to draw attention to it.

    2. explaining his editorial procedures and adding his own observations and reflections, which are so extensive that they eventually overwhelm Zampano’s text.

      Similar to the annotations in Foster Wallace's writing (footnotes on footnotes) and Jorinde Voigt's writing. The compulsion to annotate and explain is so strong, that it overwhelms the original text.

    3. nothingness haunts the text

      In Re-writing Freud by Simon Morris, words are randomly selected from Interpretation of Dreams, although "flashes of meaning persist, haunting the text."

    1. the boy patiently works away at twisting his joints and loosening the body’s grip on itself

      Foster Wallace contrasts the boy's work here with working at the IRS. While both are impossible to complete, the boy's repetitive actions are working towards a spiritual goal: loosening the body's grip on itself.

    2. a desk, a chair, a pencil, some memos, some forms, an unending stream of tax returns in need of examination, and a clock.

      Collecting objects, here in an act of boredom, removes them from their function.

      Craig Dworkin wrotes Arcades in Zero Kerning: "What is decisive in collecting is that the object is detached from all its original functions in order to enter into the closest conceivable relation to things of the same kind. The relation is the diametric opposite of any utility, and falls into the peculiar category of completeness."

      The act of collecting has the potential to transform objects into a function outside of everyday utility and monotony, and fulfill a spiritual need of completeness.

  5. Mar 2018
    1. patterns that look like noise

      patterns that look like noise or noise that we read as patterns?

    2. desk, a chair, a pencil, some memos, some forms, an unending stream of tax returns in need of examination, and a clock.

      Link to Zero Kerning by Craig Dworkin - collecting objects removes them from their function.

    1. Knoll workstation fabric panel, 3'6" by 2', with crepe Knoll workstation fabric panel, 3'6" by 2'6", with crepe Knoll workstation fabric panel, 3'6" by 3'6", with crepe BPI workstation 1/2 plexiglass panel, 5'6" by 2'6"

      List of objects: connection to The Pale King and Zero Kerning by Craig Dworkin

      Similar goal? Collecting to detach from original function?

    1. making a new book with the same words.

      Connection to Underworld, "hope of finding patterns where there seems to be nothing but noise."

  6. Feb 2018
    1. The notes sketch some of the different directions the plot might have taken.

      Similar to multiple interweaving plots in Underworld