59 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. The  Use  of  Mobile  Devices  for  Academic  Purposes  at  the  University  of  Washington:  Current  State  and  Future  Prospects

      Professional development opportunities and incentives for faculty to integrate mobile devices and as a teaching and learning tool.

    1. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

      Studies faculty provided with tablet computers and peer mentoring workshops to help increase understanding and use of mobile devices in pedogogical approaches

    1. Faculty Alert: You Can't Put the Mobile Genie Back in the Bottle

      Use of mobile devices in academic environments remains low despite the fact students demand it. However laptops are relatively common and accepted. There is growth in acceptance that mobile devices can contribute to student learning, however faculty adoption is slow.

    1. Author Catherine C. Schifter has had a long background in Educational Psychology and this article from 1999 shows her dedication to the field and provides an analysis of educators in distance learning and the evaluation that Dr. Schifter did of these programs and the motivation of faculty members who were teaching these courses at the time.

      Rating: 6/10

  2. Feb 2019
  3. Jan 2019
    1. That’s true not just within the classroom environment, but in the web of interactions students experience

      Subtle call for more cross-campus collaborations between faculty and administration. A productive form of shared governance.

    2. More specifically

      Inclusive pedagogy as an element of things faculty are probably already doing.

  4. Aug 2018
    1. Like a phantom limb, you remember who you were as a reader but cannot summon that “attentive ghost” with the joy you once felt in being transported somewhere outside the self.

      I know this feeling. This summer I made it a point to rediscover analog reading. I really had a handle on this for awhile, lost it, then re-engaged with my new tablet hardware, ReMarkable.

  5. Jul 2018
    1. In a strong culture, there are many, overlapping, and cohesive interactions among all members of the organization.

      Important for faculty development centers - being a site where interactions can happen. But how to ensure they're "cohesive" interactions?

  6. May 2018
    1. Indeed, the only published report that investigated perceptions of OER quality in the Canadian context is a survey of post-secondary faculty in British Columbia, a majority of whom perceived OER to be comparable or superior to traditional, proprietary materials (Jhangiani, Pitt, Hendricks, Key, & Lalonde, 2016).
  7. Mar 2018
  8. Feb 2018
    1. "Clear the deck," said Cheryl Rock, 40, an assistant professor of human nutrition at the University of Michigan, who opposes the elimination of mandatory retirement. "The old professors are holding back the university."
  9. Jan 2018
    1. Faculty development.

      Physical spaces for technology-based learning do not have to be student-only spaces, and actually giving faculty the choice to use these spaces as well may keep the curriculum fresh, the faculty updated on what works best for the students and students interested and feeling like their learning needs and styles are being met.

  10. Oct 2017
  11. Aug 2017
  12. Jul 2017
    1. The Board of Regents and University will not assert an interest in faculty produced textbooks, scholarly writing, art works, musical compositions and dramatic and non-dramatic literary works that are related to the faculty member's professional field unless such work is commissioned by the University or is a work for hire pursuant to Paragraph F below.
  13. www.webpages.uidaho.edu www.webpages.uidaho.edu
    1. works prepared by faculty as part of the general obligation to produce scholarly or other creative works, such as, but not limited to, articles, books, musical compositions, and works of art
    2. UI employees and students retain all rights in the copyrightable materials they create except in the cases of “UI-Sponsored Materials” as defined in Subsection B-2-b below, materials subject to grant of a non-exclusive license to UI for public access as described in Subsection B-2-c below, materials covered by a Grant or Contract as discussed in Subsection E below, and materials covered by a valid written agreement between the natural person or persons and the UI as discussed in Subsection B-5 below.
    1. In cases where a copyrightable work has been produced with support to Northwestern University from a government agency or other external source whose grant specifies that the copyright for any work created under the grant is the property of the University (as grantee), then, if permitted under the applicable grant terms, the University assigns the copyright ownership to the work to the creator(s), subject to the following conditions:
    2. ). In the case of Computer Software created by members of the Northwestern University Academic Community in the course of their employment the Creators shall grant to the University a perpetual, non-exclusive, royalty-free right and license to use, perform, display, copy, reproduce, modify and create derivatives of such works for all traditional, customary or reasonable academic or research purposes of the University.
    3. In the case of Traditional Works that are instructional materials integral to the administration of an academic program (such as laboratory manuals, placement tests, internship handbooks, etc.), the University shall also have a perpetual, royalty-free right and license to use, reproduce, modify and create derivatives of such works, for all traditional, customary or reasonable academic purposes of the University. When it proposes to exercise this right and license for instructional materials, the University shall make reasonable efforts to consult with the Creator(s)
    1. If a faculty member’s work is subject to a contractual obligation of the University, such as a sponsored research agreement, then the ownership of the copyrights with respect to such work shall be governed by the terms of the contractual obligation of the University
    2. A faculty member (an academic appointment in the professorial ranks, research ranks, or non-professorial ranks under Policy 201 “Faculty Appointments, Promotions, and Tenure,” or other policies referenced therein) owns the copyrights to scholarly works, literary works, art works, architectural works, musical works, syllabi and textbooks that such faculty member produces regardless of the form of expression
    3. this policy provides that faculty members, staff researchers, and graduate and undergraduate students own the copyrights to works they produce during their academic careers at the University, subject to limited contractual exceptions and, in certain circumstances, limited use rights
    1. Use of any materials or services paid for out of an external grant to the faculty member does not count toward substantial use.
    2. If a substantial use of Florida Tech resources is involved in the creation of the product, the university and the faculty member should plan together to recover its investment over time. A separate contact must be developed at the start of the project to cover the concerns and interests of the creator(s) and the university. This includes intellectual property rights as well as such matters as initial investments, protections, editorial control, marketing, royalties, extended use and eventual disposition. Substantial use is defined as a threshold for the investment of institutional resources that requires additional planning and preparation to recover this investment over some period of time. If use is substantial, the university is acting with the faculty member as a partner in the development of stored materials and will have rights to those materials.
    3. If the stored course material is created by full-time faculty in the context of the normal duties and does not involve substantial use of Florida Tech resources, the ownership of the intellectual property remain with the creator.
    4. Copyrightable material resulting from a project assigned to faculty as a part of their regular duties shall inure to the university only if so specified in writing and signed by the faculty member, their department head and the dean.
    5. In accordance with other institutions of higher learning and except as provided for in Paragraph 2 below, the right of first publication and of statutory copyright in any book, manuscript, television or motion picture script or film, educational material or other copyrightable work, whose author is a faculty member, shall be the property of the author.
    1. Intellectual Property that is created by Covered Individuals and that relates to their clinical, instructional, or research work is considered ABOR-Owned IP, except if it constitutes Excluded IP as set forth in Section B.1 above. This includes tangible research property, such as lab notebooks, data, research tools, prototypes, records, or written results.
    2. All Intellectual Property that is created by Covered Individuals in the course of performing research projects that are supported partially or fully by the University or any external agency (usually either a private company or a federal agency, in either case referred to as a “sponsor”) is ABOR-Owned IP, regardless of the form or type of Intellectual Property. Sometimes ABOR agrees to grant the sponsor certain ownership and/or license rights in such ABOR-Owned IP. If that is the case, that agreement governs Intellectual Property ownership. The University works with the principal investigator of such a research project when negotiating these agreements with sponsors.
    3. ABOR does claim ownership of, and Covered Individuals assign to ABOR, all right, title, and interest to all other Intellectual Property not specifically excluded under paragraph B.1.a that is created in the course and scope of employment at the University or with significant use of ABOR or University resources.
    4. ABOR does not claim ownership of the copyright (i.e., the tangible expression) in "Scholarly Works,” “Fine Art,” or “Student Works” created by Covered Individuals. All of these terms (Scholarly Works, Fine Art, and Student Works) are specifically defined in the ABOR IP Policy. Excluded IP includes, without limitation, scholarly publications, textbooks, journal articles, syllabi, course materials and notes, research bulletins, monographs, books, play scripts, theatrical productions, poems, music, movies, art, and instructional materials that are created by a Covered Individual, usually a faculty member or a student, at his or her own direction and with only incidental use of University resources.
    1. the provision of office facilities, limited secretarial assistance, library facilities for which special charges are not normally made or other resources which are made available to the public without charge, shall not be considered substantial use of University resources.
    2. Upon request by the University, the creator(s) will grant the University a nonexclusive, free of cost, world wide right and license to exercise all copyright rights in and to the work, except the right to commercially display, use, perform, or distribute copies of the work, unless to do so would impair the ability of the creator to have the work published or distributed.
    3. In keeping with traditional academic practice and policy, ownership of copyrights to works of artistry or scholarship in the creator’s professional field such as textbooks, course materials, scholarly papers and articles, software and other computer materials when they are works of artistry or scholarship, novels, poems, paintings, musical compositions or other such works of artistic imagination produced by University employees who have a general obligation to produce such works where the specific choice, content, course, and direction of the effort is determined by the employee without direct assignment or supervision by the University shall reside in the creators
    4. It is the policy of the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma that all rights in copyright shall remain with the creator of the work unless the work is created with substantial use of University resources, is specifically assigned or commissioned by the University, is subject to non-University contractual or legal obligations, or is a “work made for hire” as that term is defined by U.S. Copyright Law.
    1. For purposes of this policy, “work made for hire” should be as defined by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) Statement on Copyright.1 “Substantial use” means that the creator receives more than normal support for the project or receives time and/or resources specifically dedicated to the project.

      Footnote: The University of Kansas, Lawrence, will be guided specifically by that portion of the AAUP 1999 Statement on Copyright (AAUP Policy Documents & Reports, Tenth Edition, p.215, lines 15-21), that states, “Works created as a specific requirement of employment or as an assigned institutional duty that may, for example, be included in a written job description or an employment agreement, may be fairly deemed works made for hire. Even absent such prior written specification, ownership will vest in the college or university in those cases in which it provides the specific authorization or supervision for the preparation of the work. Examples are reports prepared by a dean or by the chair or members of a faculty committee, or college promotional brochures prepared by a director of admissions.”

    2. The rights to copyrightable software with an actual or projected market value in excess of $10,000 annually, except software included in computer-mediated courseware, shall be determined pursuant to the Board's Patent and Copyrightable Software12 Policy (II.A.8.b).
    3. When the University specifically directs the creation of mediated courseware by assigning one or more employees to develop the mediated courseware and supplies them with materials and time to develop the mediated courseware, the resulting mediated courseware belongs to the University and the University shall have the right to revise it and decide who will utilize the mediated courseware in instruction. The University may specifically agree to share revenues and control rights with the employee.
    4. When employees develop mediated courseware without specific direction by the University, unless otherwise agreed, the ownership of the courseware shall remain with the employee.
    5. The mediated courseware shall not be sold, leased, rented or otherwise used in a manner that competes in a substantial way with the for-credit offering of the University unless that transaction has received the approval of the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor
    6. Notwithstanding any use of institutional resources or “work made for hire,” the ownership of textbooks, scholarly monographs, trade publications, maps, charts, articles in popular magazines and newspapers, novels, nonfiction works, supporting materials, artistic works, and like works shall reside with the creator(s) and any revenue derived from their work shall belong to the creator(s).
  14. Mar 2017
  15. Feb 2017
    1. How do I take Attendance using the Moodle Attendance activity? PageHow can I use the Attendance activity to track student participation or assess repeating assignments? Page
  16. Nov 2016
  17. Oct 2016