26 Matching Annotations
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    1. company worth having and think we may safely reckon on securing you two large families, one a rich West Indian from Surrey, the other a most respectable Girls Boarding School, or Academy, from Camberwell

      Defining the "rich" West Indian family and the "most respectable" Girls Boarding Academy as "company worth having" is a direct commentary on the socioeconomic break downs of society and Austen's views / judgment on what makes a society or company worth having. In Emma, Austen uses Harriet and Mrs. Elton to have even more pointed conversations about who and what is respectable company.

    2. succeeding as eldest son

      In Austen's novels, birth order is an important aspect of one's identity, particularly in consideration of their expected fortune. One of the main issues a character who is not the eldest face is not being an inheritor of the fortune, which then affect their marriage prospect of freedom of choice. An example of such is Colonel Fitzwilliam in Pride and Prejudice, who is the youngest son of an earl without expectations of much inheritance and thus has to use marriage also to ensure his own financial security. This is also the case for Edmund in Mansfield Park who becomes a clergy to support himself.

    3. Heywoods were a thoroughly respectable family

      Similar to all the other families that Austen's characters happen to interact with - all "respectable" families of probably the gentry class. In Pride and Prejudice, the Bingleys were "of a respectable family in the north of England" (P12) while in Northanger Abbey, Mr Tilney was also "of a very respectable family in Gloucestshire" (p17).

    4. I could no more mention these things to Lady Denham

      Propriety overrides charity for Mrs. Parker. Likewise, in Austen's novels, many technically beneficial things are not said for fear of violating social decorum. This frustration is expressed by Elinor in Sense and Sensibility, when she could only guess at what others meant through allusions and off-hand comments, and is unable to prod the situation herself. Austen uses this dilemma to show the consequences of always adhering to social rules.

    5. modern Sanditon

      Modernity and fashionability are desirable characteristics that Mr. Parker is actively trying to cultivate in Sanditon. This is a marked departure from the value system that is practiced by characters in previous Austen novels. Pride and Prejudice's Darcy or Northanger Abbey's General Tilney are concerned with a preservation of inherited wealth and status, rather than the active generation of new wealth.

    6. For though I am only the dowager, my dear, and he is the heir, things do not stand between us in the way they commonly do between those two parties.

      Lady Denham and Sir Edward are in a similar situation to Lady Catherine de Bourgh and Mr. Darcy in Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Similarly, Lady Denham goes on to take an active role in Sir Edward's marital prospects, as well as urging the heroine not to pursue him, though perhaps in less aggressive terms than Lady Catherine to Lizzie Bennet.

    7. for Sir Edward must marry for money

      In a stark reversal from Pride and Prejudice, in this work Lady Denham suggests the man must marry for money instead of the heroine. This seems to flip the standard Austen plot revolving around the 'marriage market' on its head, and would surely have created conflict later on in the novel had Austen completed it.

    8. and I rubbed his ankle with my own hand for six hours without intermission

      Compared to most of Austen's other works, this incident is an extreme amount of contact and interaction between characters from different "socioeconomic classes." The servants and coachmen etc. are often mentioned in passing. Emma is said to do some charity work but it is also mentioned in broad terms and the reader is never shown a scene of such acts.

    9. It is bad that he should be fancying himself too sickly for any profession and sit down at one and twenty, on the interest of his own little fortune, without any idea of attempting to improve it or of engaging in any occupation that may be of use to himself or others. But let us talk of pleasanter things.

      Conversations about the importance or necessity of an occupation are rare in Austen's novels. If they occur at all they are about men and often in the context of them needing a way to provide for their future family. Within that context, this comment from Mr. Parker directed at Sidney and pointedly addressing his socioeconomic status seems out of character for Austen and is one aspect that differentiates Sanditon from her other works.

    10. cooks, housemaids, washerwomen and bathing women

      Insight onto the different types of "help" a family like the Griffiths would have at this seaside resort

    11. secured a proper house at eight guineas per week for Mrs. Griffiths

      Indicating that Mrs. Griffiths comes from a socioeconomic status that allows her to be in this new type of class that rents houses in beach towns for just a week. This is also something we have not seen other characters do in other Austen novels.

    12. poor man for his rank in society

      Austen's description of Sir Edward as a poor man relative to his peers of the same rank highlights the divergence between title and money in England towards the end of Austen's life--a prominent theme in both Persuasion and Northanger Abbey.