10 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2018
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    1. The smile passed away from Gabriel’s face. A dull anger began to gather again at the back of his mind and the dull fires of his lust began to glow angrily in his veins

      There seems to be a lot of sharp turns in the mood of the main characters in the story; not long ago Gabriel had been "trembling with delight at her sudden kiss", I wonder if we could see such a pattern of highs followed by significant lows by doing a sentiment analysis on the stories in Dubliners. On the other hand, Gabriel strongly reminds me of Mr. Hammond in Mansfield's The Stranger, as his solicitude, anxiety regarding women, and overprotected-ness of his wife is emphasized several times throughout this story, and in the end a dead man also drives the wedge between the couple.

    2. No memory of the past touched him, for his mind was full of a present joy.

      There's a quick (and almost absurd) change in mood where just in the previous paragraph he was sad when thinking about life; I'm guessing that there will be a fairly steep slope here if we do a sentiment analysis.

  3. Jul 2018
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    1. I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to knock. I walked away slowly along the sunny side of the street, reading all the theatrical advertisements in the shopwindows as I went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a sensation of freedom as if I had been freed from something by his death. I wondered at this for, as my uncle had said the night before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin properly. He had told me stories about the catacombs and about Napoleon Bonaparte, and he had explained to me the meaning of the different ceremonies of the Mass and of the different vestments worn by the priest. Sometimes he had amused himself by putting difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain circumstances or whether such and such sins were mortal or venial or only imperfections.

      Packed with mixed feelings of curiosity, fear, deferral, confusion, irritation, freedom, and reminiscing, this passage suggests that the narrator's relationship with the late Father Flynn is far more complicated (and perhaps troubling) than meets the eye. The language of this excerpt is ripe for close reading, but we could also explore it computationally by calculating pronoun frequencies (i.e., how often "he" and "him" appear compared to "I" and "me"), and by performing a sentiment analysis in a Jupyter notebook. It would be interesting to compare one's close readings with the results of a computer-generated sentiment analysis.

    1. “Dreadfully sweet!

      There is definitely a lot negative sentiment in this narrative. It would be interesting to do a sentiment analysis with this story and the Garden Party, which seems to have more a positive connotation. I would be interested in seeing which turns out to be the more negative of the two.

    2. There came a little rustle, a scurry, a hop.

      There have been some interesting verbs in the narrative thus far, especially this little cluster here. While the use of verbs has been frequent, the verbs them self have been some what gentle and not aggressive or assertive. I would be interested in performing a word frequency analysis to gather all the verbs, followed by a sentiment analysis to see if they are congruent with this theme of gentle submission / obedience which arises in the text.

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    1. The chance of searching into the loss of the Moonstone, is the one chance of inquiry that Rachel herself has left me.”

      Throughout his narrative Blake repeatedly links the mention of Rachel to the mention of the Moonstone / Diamond. I would be interested in running a word colocation / frequency analysis to see how often this happens in Blake's narrative and throughout the rest of the text. It may also be worth while to do a sentiment analysis and see what the tone is for each mention based on which narrative it came occurred in.

    2. The picture presented of me, by my old friend Betteredge, at the time of my departure from England, is (as I think) a little overdrawn. He has, in his own quaint way, interpreted seriously one of his young mistress’s many satirical references to my foreign education; and has persuaded himself that he actually saw those French, German, and Italian sides to my character, which my lively cousin only professed to discover in jest, and which never had any real existence, except in our good Betteredge’s own brain. But, barring this drawback, I am bound to own that he has stated no more than the truth in representing me as wounded to the heart by Rachel’s treatment, and as leaving England in the first keenness of suffering caused by the bitterest disappointment of my life.

      Although the novel has already suggested that Betteredge is an unreliable narrator, Franklin Blake's explicit refutation of specific points in the First Period account corroborates the faultiness of Betteredge's perspective. Whom should we trust? Maybe a comparative sentiment analysis of Betteredge and Blake's accounts would allow us to test Blake's claim that Betteredge has "overdrawn" his narrative and interpreted passing references too "seriously."

    3. And what of that?–you may reply–the thing is done every day. Granted, my dear sir. But would you think of it quite as lightly as you do, if the thing was done (let us say) with your own sister?

      Mathew Bruff carefully anticipates the reader's objections, and tries to persuade him ("my dear sir") to reconsider his assessment of Godfrey Ablewhite. To better understand how and why The Moonstone's various narrators directly address readers, we could run a word collocation analysis and/or a sentiment analysis on each moment that features a narrator addressing a reader. Then, we would be informed enough to speculate about the extent to which such addresses prove effective.

    4. There had once been an occasion, under somewhat similar circumstances, when Miss Jane Ann Stamper had been taken by the two shoulders and turned out of a room. I waited, inspired by HER spirit, for a repetition of HER martyrdom

      Now that we have a woman narrator, I would be interested to performing a sentiment analysis and compare Miss Clack with Mr. Betteredge and the words they use to describe the female characters in the story in addition to the overall differences in word use and phrasing. It would also make for an interesting study about the author and his ability to create distinct voices for each character.

    5. Penelope fired up instantly. “I’ve never been taught to tell lies Mr. Policeman!–and if father can stand there and hear me accused of falsehood and thieving, and my own bed-room shut against me, and my character taken away, which is all a poor girl has left, he’s not the good father I take him for!”

      Penelope has been a compelling and independent character throughout the narrative, from the ways in which she gives insight to the narrative itself , to this moment here. It would be interesting to extract her character descriptions and speech and compare it to the other female characters in the story to see how they are different / similar. I would also be interested in comparing her to the male characters. Would this be something the sentiment analysis could be used for?