9 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2018
    1. At that she threw back her coat; she turned and faced me; her lips parted. “Good heavens—why! I—I don’t mind it a bit. I—I like waiting.” And suddenly her cheeks crimsoned, her eyes grew dark—for a moment I thought she was going to cry. “L—let me, please,” she stammered, in a warm, eager voice. “I like it. I love waiting! Really—really I do! I’m always waiting—in all kinds of places... “ Her dark coat fell open, and her white throat—all her soft young body in the blue dress—was like a flower that is just emerging from its dark bud.

      Could go in detailed analysis with all the striking colors. 'crimson','dark',;white', 'blue' and 'gold' appeared quite frequently in the story. Perhaps the colors were a symbolism of her status and her pensive nature. A young girl that was always waiting, in all kinds of places.

    2. There came a little rustle, a scurry, a hop.

      There have been some interesting verbs in the narrative thus far, especially this little cluster here. While the use of verbs has been frequent, the verbs them self have been some what gentle and not aggressive or assertive. I would be interested in performing a word frequency analysis to gather all the verbs, followed by a sentiment analysis to see if they are congruent with this theme of gentle submission / obedience which arises in the text.

    3. caring for the smell of lavender.

      Even this early in the narrative there have a variety of plants and characters introduced (almost like a garden of characters as well as plants). I would be interested in doing a comparison of the variety of characters mentioned, including those mentioned only by description compared with the plants. We perform a word frequency analysis and also look for Ngrams.

  2. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. There is here, moral, if not legal, evidence, that the murder was committed by the Indians.

      This is a very interesting take on "evidence" as being moral if not legal by Sergeant Cuff. It makes me question exactly what he means by that if there is a way to use computational analysis to find out. We could perhaps start by parsing out "evidence" throughout the text with a machine learning algorithm to help he define evidence and then, going forward, device a way (maybe with sentiment analysis) to determine moral evidence from legal evidence.

    2. The chance of searching into the loss of the Moonstone, is the one chance of inquiry that Rachel herself has left me.”

      Throughout his narrative Blake repeatedly links the mention of Rachel to the mention of the Moonstone / Diamond. I would be interested in running a word colocation / frequency analysis to see how often this happens in Blake's narrative and throughout the rest of the text. It may also be worth while to do a sentiment analysis and see what the tone is for each mention based on which narrative it came occurred in.

    3. Having heard the story of the past, my next inquiries (still inquiries after Rachel!) advanced naturally to the present time. Under whose care had she been placed after leaving Mr. Bruff’s house? and where was she living now?

      Blake's account of Rachel is clearly distinct form the other narrators because of their romantic past. He mentions her frequently throughout his narrative. I would like to run a frequency count the number of times he mentions Rachel compared tot he rest of the narratives in the book. I wonder if it is possible to isolate the discussions of Rachel in each character's narrative and then do some topic modeling with the extracted texts to examine how Rachel is discussed by each character.

    4. It distressed me, it did indeed distress me, to hear her say that. She was so young and so lonely–and she bore it so well!

      Bruff's impression of Rachel is very different from Miss Clack, but similar to the affectionate tone of Betteredge. I would be interested in running a word frequency count on all of the ways Rachel is described by the different narrators and do a comparison between the words used by the different narrators and also which words they share in her description.

    5. Early on that memorable day, our gifted Mr. Godfrey happened to be cashing a cheque at a banking-house in Lombard Street

      Miss Clack has made several mentions of wealth, poverty and other financial concerns. It seems that she correlates her narrative with economic status or financially related events, such as chasing a check. I would be interested in doing a frequency count to see how often these types of terms are used in her narrative compared to the others.

    6. “This is a miserable world,” says the Sergeant.

      Sergeant Cuff is total downer. His dialogue tends to be really negative. I would be interested in doing a text analysis of the words his character uses to see the frequency of words with a negative connotation in comparison to the neutral and positive words used.