5 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2020
    1. It was a direct encouragement to her reckless way of talking, and her insolent reference to me.

      Wow. Miss Clack hates Rachel this much to the degree that does not align with her "very" Christian ways. Perhaps her malicious thoughts towards Rachel are projections of how she feels between their class difference, even if they are cousins.

    2. There was an absence of all lady-like restraint in her language and manner most painful to see. She was possessed by some feverish excitement which made her distressingly loud when she laughed, and sinfully wasteful and capricious in what she ate and drank at lunch.

      Like Ashley's annotations above, I'm also quite intrigued about the varying impressions of Betteredge and Miss Clack on Rachel. In these lines, it may look that Miss Clack's irritation towards Rachel stems from how Rachel seems so "unconventional" (at least to Miss Clack's eyes), but it also sounds that she envies Rachel unorthodox ways.

    3. and poor polite Mr. Godfrey had paid the penalty of

      Miss Clack seems to be trying to 'protect' Mr. Godfrey throughout the naration. Might this be an indication of something more relevant to the plot. Narrators are supposed to be interpreted as truthful according to Collins, which further enchances the confusion. Nevertheless, that doesn't nessesarily exclude the possibility of underplaying certain facts, which seems to be what is happening to me. Assuming that this is the case, it acts as a strong indication for Mr. Godfrey being somehow involved. So far Miss Clack is depicted as a figure of questionable morality. It would be interesting to see what role Mr. Godfrey has at the end of the story.

  2. Jul 2018
  3. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. I propose to tell you–in the first place–what is known of the manner in which your cousin met his death; appending to the statement such inferences and conclusions as we are justified (according to my opinion) in drawing from the facts

      Sergeant Cuff's narrative is very straight forward and to the point compared to the others, especially Miss Clack. Because Cuff's intention in this narrative is to relay facts to Franklin, and also because he is a detective, Cuff uses few unnecessary adjectives or "flowery" language. I would be interested in running a POS (Parts of Speech) analysis on Cuff's narrative and compare it to Clack and Betteredge, as well as the rest of the text.

    2. Early on that memorable day, our gifted Mr. Godfrey happened to be cashing a cheque at a banking-house in Lombard Street

      Miss Clack has made several mentions of wealth, poverty and other financial concerns. It seems that she correlates her narrative with economic status or financially related events, such as chasing a check. I would be interested in doing a frequency count to see how often these types of terms are used in her narrative compared to the others.