6 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2018
  2. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. There is here, moral, if not legal, evidence, that the murder was committed by the Indians.

      This is a very interesting take on "evidence" as being moral if not legal by Sergeant Cuff. It makes me question exactly what he means by that if there is a way to use computational analysis to find out. We could perhaps start by parsing out "evidence" throughout the text with a machine learning algorithm to help he define evidence and then, going forward, device a way (maybe with sentiment analysis) to determine moral evidence from legal evidence.

    2. I propose to tell you–in the first place–what is known of the manner in which your cousin met his death; appending to the statement such inferences and conclusions as we are justified (according to my opinion) in drawing from the facts

      Sergeant Cuff's narrative is very straight forward and to the point compared to the others, especially Miss Clack. Because Cuff's intention in this narrative is to relay facts to Franklin, and also because he is a detective, Cuff uses few unnecessary adjectives or "flowery" language. I would be interested in running a POS (Parts of Speech) analysis on Cuff's narrative and compare it to Clack and Betteredge, as well as the rest of the text.

    3. On the day before, Mr. Godfrey Ablewhite arrived at his father’s house, and asked (as I know from Mr. Ablewhite, senior, himself) for a loan of three hundred pounds. Mark the sum; and remember at the same time, that the half-yearly payment to the young gentleman was due on the twenty-fourth of the month. Also, that the whole of the young gentleman’s fortune had been spent by his Trustee, by the end of the year ’forty-seven.

      The facts elicited by the inquiry were stated by Sergeant Cuff in the most discreet and circumspect manner. The Sergeant, though placidly retired at this moment, still retained his habitual discreetness when writing his report. He took a particular attention to the due dates and sum of money, which, evidently were the keys to unravel the mystery shrouding Mr.Godfrey Ablewhite's conducts.

    4. Inquiring at the hotel, I received the necessary directions for finding the Sergeant’s cottage. It was approached by a quiet bye-road, a little way out of the town, and it stood snugly in the middle of its own plot of garden ground, protected by a good brick wall at the back and the sides, and by a high quickset hedge in front. The gate, ornamented at the upper part by smartly-painted trellis-work, was locked. After ringing at the bell, I peered through the trellis-work, and saw the great Cuff’s favourite flower everywhere; blooming in his garden, clustering over his door, looking in at his windows. Far from the crimes and the mysteries of the great city, the illustrious thief-taker was placidly living out the last Sybarite years of his life, smothered in roses!

      Right here, the tenderness of Sergeant Cuff emerged again. The adjectives used to describe his cottage and his lifestyle could be extracted to delineate a clearer profile of the Sergeant.

    5. Shall we say that she walked through the water from this point till she got to that ledge of rocks behind us, and came back the same way, and then took to the beach again where those two heel marks are still left?

      I find Sergeant Cuffs monologue at this point in the narrative very interesting. He posits his analysis about what occurred as questions to Mr. Betteredge in a way that also describe the scene to the reader without being overly expository. This device is used frequently throughout the narrative. I would be interested to run an analysis on Cuffs dialogue throughout the narrative to see how often he uses this type of questioning inform his detective work. It could be accomplished by analyzing how many question marks occur in his dialogue compared to other punctuation.

    6. “This is a miserable world,” says the Sergeant.

      Sergeant Cuff is total downer. His dialogue tends to be really negative. I would be interested in doing a text analysis of the words his character uses to see the frequency of words with a negative connotation in comparison to the neutral and positive words used.