4 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2018
  2. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. Those two sat on either side of Miss Rachel, who, as queen of the day, was naturally the great attraction of the party.

      Oh. The Birthday party will start!!! The most interesting part will appear. In fact, the queen of the party --- Miss Rachel who is loved deeply by the Mr. Franklin. And in the party, the Moonstone would be stolen. And I am looking forward to reading how the moonstone would be stolen. And maybe, some important clues would be found later.

  3. Jul 2018
  4. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. Having heard the story of the past, my next inquiries (still inquiries after Rachel!) advanced naturally to the present time. Under whose care had she been placed after leaving Mr. Bruff’s house? and where was she living now?

      Blake's account of Rachel is clearly distinct form the other narrators because of their romantic past. He mentions her frequently throughout his narrative. I would like to run a frequency count the number of times he mentions Rachel compared tot he rest of the narratives in the book. I wonder if it is possible to isolate the discussions of Rachel in each character's narrative and then do some topic modeling with the extracted texts to examine how Rachel is discussed by each character.

    2. It distressed me, it did indeed distress me, to hear her say that. She was so young and so lonely–and she bore it so well!

      Bruff's impression of Rachel is very different from Miss Clack, but similar to the affectionate tone of Betteredge. I would be interested in running a word frequency count on all of the ways Rachel is described by the different narrators and do a comparison between the words used by the different narrators and also which words they share in her description.

  5. May 2018