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  1. Last 7 days
    1. One of my inquiries was for anecdotes regarding mistakes made between the twins by their near relatives. The replies are numerous, but not very varied in character. When the twins are children, they are usually distinguished by ribbons tied round the wrist or neck; nevertheless the one is sometimes fed, physicked, and whipped by mistake for the other, and the description of these little domestic catastrophes was usually given by the mother, in a phraseology that is some- [p. 158] what touching by reason of its seriousness.

  2. Feb 2024
    1. not only do comparisons disagree about how we should interpret Wittgenstein’s philosophy but also about which Wittgenstein too.

      for - indyweb example - conversations with old self

      Comment - this demonstrates how each individual consciousness is evolutionary and never the same river twice. - we are not a fixed thing, but a constantly churning cauldron of ideas

    1. Your zettelkasten, having a perfect memory of your "past self" acts as a ratchet so that when you have a new conversation on a particular topic, your "present self" can quickly remember where you left off and not only advance the arguments but leave an associative trail for your "future self" to continue on again later.

      Many thoughts and associations occur when you're having conversations with any text, whether it's with something you're reading by another author or your own notes in your zettelkasten or commonplace book. For more conversations on this topic, perhaps thumb through: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=tag%3A%27conversations+with+the+text%27

      If you view conversations broadly as means of finding and collecting information from external sources and naturally associating them together, perhaps you'll appreciate this quote:

      No piece of information is superior to any other. Power lies in having them all on file and then finding the connections. There are always connections; you have only to want to find them.—Umberto Eco in Foucault's Pendulum (Secker & Warburg)

      (Reply to u/u/Plastic-Lettuce-7150 at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/1ae2qf4/communicating_with_a_zettelkasten/)

  3. Jan 2024
    1. what kind of character type might he fit?

      Krishna is the incarnation of Vishnu. He's supposed to be the embodiment of a godlike character and hold many powerful qualities. He has many different character types he portrays in this story and is extremely accomplished. He urges the reader in a way to think about reincarnation which is obviously a big part of his character. "The place of the infinite spirit" (line 851) Krishna fits a representation of love, duty, honor and self control. Learning what type of character type Krishna is this early on is important to keep in mind as the story is read. If the reader doesn't understand the true depth of his character the story may not be as powerful. He shows many attributes of a fully developed character that knows the true power of who they are. In HIndu culture, a character like Krishna is all powerful but also shows a variety of character traits that make him a very admirable character.

    1. dreaming can be seen as the "default" position for the activated brain

      for - dream theory - dreaming as default state of brain

      • Dreaming can be seen as the "default" position for the activated brain
      • when it is not forced to focus on
        • physical and
        • social reality by
          • (1) external stimuli and
          • (2) the self system that reminds us of
            • who we are,
            • where we are, and
            • what the tasks are
          • that face us.

      Question - I wonder what evolutionary advantage dreaming would bestow to the first dreaming organisms? - why would a brain evolve to have a default behaviour with no outside connection? - Survival is dependent on processing outside information. There seems to be a contradiction here - I wonder what opinion Michael Levin would have on this theory?

    1. diseases with chronic inflammation 00:28:24 like lupus like rheumatoid arthritis like diabetes

      for - diseases with chronic inflammation - lupus - rheumatoid arthritis - diabetes

    1. 9:25 rhetorik, emo-sprache, "er ist angepisst", defensive, abblocken, mauer, sekte, exklusiv, feinde ausschließen, kampfbegriffe, andere als "krank" beschimpfen und ignorieren, bashing ...

      naja, ich mache das aber auch so. "mit idioten diskutieren" ist einfach nur zeitverschwendung, nicht-produktiver feindkontakt, kennste einen dann kennste alle. "if they dont listen, move on, so you can warn others." "dont argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." da kann ich genauso gut mit tauben schach spielen, oder mit blinden über farben streiten. zeitverschwendung.

      der einfachste intelligenztest ist das thema globale übervölkerung. wer die übervölkerung leugnet, der hat sich selbst disqualifiziert aus jeder ernsthaften rationalen diskussion. solche leute sollen zu ihren wohlfühl-veranstaltungen ("demos") gehen, wo sie sich gegenseitig bestätigen, wie schlau die alle sind... dummheit ist auch ein "kult", dumme wollen unter sich sein, dumm und glücklich

      aber ja, auch dumme sind allergisch gegen schlaue menschen, und sind dann "angepisst", also beleidigt, und gegen wahrheit hilft nur gewalt, also ausgrenzen, zensieren, löschen, rauswerfen, ignorieren, ...

    1. The mortgage document which secures the promissory note by giving the lender an interest in the property and the right to take and sell the property—that is, foreclose—if the mortgage payments aren't made.
    1. book aims of education

      for - book - Aims of Education

      Followup - book - Aims of Education - author: Alfred North Whitehead - a collection of papers and thoughts on the critical role of education in determining the future course of civilization

      epiphany - adjacency between - Lifework and evolutionary nature of the individual - - people-centered Indyweb -- Alfred North Whitehead's ideas and life history - adjacency statement - Listening to the narrator speaking about Whitehead's work from a historical perspective brought up the association with the Indyweb's people-centered design - This is especially salient given that Whitehead felt education played such a critical role in determining the future course of humanity - If Whitehead were alive, he would likely appreciate the Indyweb design because it is based on the human being as a process rather than a static entity, - hence renaming human being to human INTERbeCOMing, a noun replaced by a verb - Indyweb's people-centered design and default temporal, time-date recording of ideas as they occur provides inherent traceability to the evolution of an individual's consciousness - Furthermore, since it is not only people-centered but also INTERPERSONAL, we can trace the evolution of ideas within a social network. - Since individual and collective intelligence are both evolutionary and intertwingled, they are both foundational in Indyweb's design ethos. - In particular, Indyweb frames the important evolutionary process of - having a conversation with your old self - as a key aspect of the evolutionary growth of the individual's consciousness

    1. I've found that a lot of um Pioneers who have had brilliant ideas and have fought through and you know sort of um uh spent a lot of energy in their life pushing 00:42:00 some someone with some new idea those people are often the most resistant to other new ideas it's amazing

      for - resonates with - existing meme

      resonates with - existing meme - yesterday's revolutionaries become today's old guard

      • What I tell my students just be very careful with people who are
        • very smart and
        • very successful
      • They know their stuff they're not necessarily calibrated on your stuff

      comment - Lebenswelt and multimeaningverse

    1. This is why choosing an external system that forces us todeliberate practice and confronts us as much as possible with ourlack of understanding or not-yet-learned information is such a smartmove.

      Choosing an external system for knowledge keeping and production forces the learner into a deliberate practice and confronts them with their lack of understanding. This is a large part of the underlying value not only of the zettelkasten, but of the use of a commonplace book which Benjamin Franklin was getting at when recommending that one "read with a pen in your hand". The external system also creates a modality shift from reading to writing by way of thinking which further underlines the value.

      What other building blocks are present in addition to: - modality shift - deliberate practice - confrontation of lack of understanding

      Are there other systems that do all of these as well as others simultaneously?


      link to Franklin quote: https://hypothes.is/a/HZeDKI3YEeyj9GcNWKX4iA

    1. You should read with a pen in your hand andenter...short hints of what you feel...may be useful; forthis be the best method of imprinting [them] in yourmemory. Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

      original source?

      it's Benjamin Franklin letter to Miss Stevenson, Wanstead. Craven-street, May 16, 1760.<br /> see: https://hyp.is/HZeDKI3YEeyj9GcNWKX4iA/www.gutenberg.org/files/40236/40236-h/40236-h.htm

    1. four different types of initiators of new community projectsbased in neighbourhoods:local government,governmental organisations,non-governmental organisations or activists andexisting communities.
      • for: types of initiators of community projects, SONEC - initiators of community projects, question - frameworks for community projects, suggestion - collaboration with My Climate Risk, suggestion - collaboration with U of Hawaii, suggestion - collaboration with ICICLE, suggestion - collaboration with earth commission, suggestion - collaboration with DEAL

      • question: frameworks for community projects

        • If our interest is to attempt to create a global collective action campaign to address our existential polycrisis, which includes the climate crisis, then how do we mobilize at the community level in a meaningful way?

        • I suggest that this must be a cosmolocal effort. Why? Knowledge sharing across all the communities will accelerate the transition of any participating local community.

        • This means that we cannot rely on citizens living in small communities to construct an effective coordination framework for rapid de-escalation of the polycrisis. The capacity does not exist within small communities to build such a complex system. The system can be more effectively built before the collective action campaign is started by a virtual community of experts and ready for trial with pilot communities.
        • To meet this enormous challenge, it cannot be done in an adhoc way. At this point in time, many people in many communities all around the globe know of the existential crisis we face, but if we look at the annual carbon emissions, none of the existing community efforts has made a difference in their continuing escalation.
        • The knowledge required to synchronize millions of communities to have a unified wartime-scale collective action mobilization to reach decarbonization goals that the mainstream approach has not even made a dent in will be a complex problem.
        • In other words, what is proposed is a partnership.
        • Since we are faced with global commons problems that pose existential threats if not mitigated in 5 to 8 years, the scope of the problem is enormous.
        • Super wicked problems require unprecedented levels of collaboration at every level.
        • The downscaling of global planetary boundaries and doughnut economics seems the most logical way to think global, act local.
        • Building such a collaboration system requires expert knowledge. Once built, however, it requires testing in pilot communities. This is where a partnership can take place

        • 2024, Jan. 1 Adder

          • My Climate Risk Regional Hubs
            • time 29:46 of https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Funfccc.int%2Fevent%2Flater-is-too-late-tipping-the-balance-from-negative-to-positive&group=world
            • https://www.wcrp-climate.org/mcr-hubs
            • Suggestion:
              • SRG has long entertained a collaborative open science project for grassroots polycrisis / climate crisis education - to measure and validate latest climate departure dates
              • This would make climate change far more salient to the average person because of the observable trends in disruption of local economic activity connected to the local ecology due to climate impacts
              • This would be a synergistic project between SRG, LCE, SoNeC, My Climate Risk hubs, ICICLE and U of Hawaii
              • Our community frameworks need to go BEYOND simply adaptation though, which is what "My Climate Risk" focuses exclusively on. We need to also engage equally in climate mitigation.
        • reference
        • I coedited this volume on examples of existing cosmolocal projects
  4. Dec 2023
    1. SDGs
      • for: recommendation - replace SDG with downscaled earth system boundaries / doughnut economics

      • recommendation

        • recommend syncing local actions to global impacts via downscaled earth system boundaries instead of just SDGs due to the urgent nature of the climate crisis
      • for: transition - emotional pain of, degrowth - emotional pain of, Kristina Bogner

      • title: Coping with transition pain: An emotions perspective on phase-outs in sustainability transitions

      • author
        • Kristina Bogner
        • Barbara Kump
        • Mayte Beekman
        • Julia Wittmayer
      • date

      • HIGHLIGHTS

        • introduce the idea of transition pain in transition-in-the-making
        • explain how emotions in transitions are
          • process-dependent,
          • culturally and socially embedded and
          • political
        • suggest a 'coping with transition pain' perspective for more integrated engagements with phase-outs
      • ABSTRACT

        • With this perspective paper, we aim to raise awareness of and offer starting points for studying the role of emotions and associated behavioural responses to losses in relation to phase-outs.
        • We start from a psychological perspective and explain how
          • losses due to phasing out dominant
            • practices,
            • structures, and
            • cultures
          • may threaten core psychological needs and lead to - what we introduce as - ‘transition pain’.
        • We borrow insights from the psychological coping literature to explain that different forms of transition pain may elicit characteristic coping responses (e.g.
          • opposition,
          • escape,
          • negotiation),
        • shaping
          • individual meaning-making and
          • behaviour
        • in ongoing sustainability transitions.
        • We then expand this psychological lens and present three additional perspectives, namely, that transition pain is
          • (1) dynamic and process-dependent,
          • (2) collectively shared and socially conditioned, and
          • (3) political.
        • We discuss how a ‘coping with transition pain’ lens can contribute to a better understanding of
          • individual and collective meaning-making,
          • behaviour and agency in transitions as well as
          • a more emotion-sensitive governance of phase-outs.
      • SUMMARY

        • It's good to have knowledge about the emotional aspects of transition as these challenging emotions constitute obstacles to transition.
        • It is really a letting go process. High density fossil fuels has created a high energy lifestyle that we have become use to. When we no longer have access to high energy density fossil fuels, our life has to change quite radically.
        • We are like a spoiled child that must now contend with the loss of what we took for granted. The politics of libertariansim is based on protecting our right to a high energy density lifestyle.
        • We need to now how to deal with this loss, as it is very profound
    1. we as a society do…. Stuff to get money
      • for: money - enabling transaction with strangers, adjacency - money - othering

      • adjacency between

        • money
        • othering
        • competition
        • sacred
      • adjacency statement
        • in exchange for MY labour, I have access to the fruits of others
        • how much money your can get used how much resource produced by others you can get
        • we accumulate money for ourselves and don't share much with others
        • othering is built into the use of money ,- the artificial scarcity of money puts us all in competition with each other for a scarce resource
        • competition is othering
        • by default, the economic game is about grabbing the most resources for self
        • hence it is facing a direction AWAY from the sacred
        • it intrinsically does not treat all others a equally sacred
        • it promotes an every-person-for themselves attitude
    1. The next step would be a convergence with the commons of physical production, the cosmo-local urban commons and p2p hardware companies, so that crypto governance becomes a mutual coordination infrastructure for more and more human citizens.
      • for: quote - ethereum - milestone - integration with physical production commons

      • quote

        • The next step would be a convergence with the commons of physical production, the cosmo-local urban commons and p2p hardware companies, so that crypto governance becomes a mutual coordination infrastructure for more and more human citizens
      • author: Michel Bauwens
      • date: 2023
    1. this God is very clearly a 00:09:27 human invention now it doesn't mean it's necessarily bad and it doesn't certainly doesn't mean it's unimportant the fictional stories humans invent are some of the most powerful forces in history 00:09:40 and very often they can also be positive forces there is nothing inherently wrong in fiction
      • for: quote - Yuval Noah Harari, quote - nothing wrong with fictions

      • quote -This God is very clearly a human invention. Now it doesn't mean it's necessarily bad. It doesn't certainly mean its unimportant.

      • author: Yuval Noah Harari
  5. Nov 2023
    1. σ2^β1=1nVar[(Xi−μX)ui][Var(Xi)]2.

      This formula is wrong. It should be as follows: $$Var(\hat{\beta}1) = \frac{\sum{i=1}^N Var(x_i - \bar{x})^2 u_i}{(Var(\sum_{i=1}^N (x_i - \bar{x})^2))}$$

      Otherwise, $\sigma_{\hat{\beta}_1}$ is different for each $u_i$.

    1. It does provide an answer. The issue is that the Google form validates that the user has input a valid looking URL. So he needs to input an arbitrary, but valid URL, and then add that to /etc/hosts so his browser will resolve it to the address of his devserver. The question and answer are both fine as is and don't require any critique or clarification.

      The critical comment this was apparently in reply to was apparently deleted

    1. for those people who have sleep apnea try gargling with salt water before you 00:14:31 go to bed you may be amazed 40 50 percent of you may say the next morning i don't know what the heck happened but guess what salt water 00:14:42 reduces inflammation so gargling with salt water can be a cure for many of those conditions
      • for: sleep apnea - potential treatment - gargling salt water to reduce inflammation, sleep apnea - potential treatment - eliminate sugar
    1. Feminist analyses see both the state and trafficking networks as threats to security, as trafficked persons lack freedom of movement and are at risk of abuse and poor health

      opens the table to consider more things in terms of IR security

    2. Improving reproductive health and addressing gender inequalities are crucial for promoting human security.
    3. onsidering gender in discussions of human security and argues for a balanced focus on both freedom from fear and freedom from want.
    4. evidenced by the lack of involvement of women in drafting the new constitution and the passing of repressive legislation.
    5. "responsibility to protect" (R2P).R2P suggests that states have a responsibility to intervene and protect civilians in other states if they are unable or unwilling to do so themselves.Some feminist scholars argue that the language of protection can reinforce gendered and racialized narratives.
    6. issues of human security and human rights are sometimes used as justifications for military intervention.

      e.g., with women and Taliban

    7. The focus on individuals in human security discourse may overlook vulnerabilities and threats that are linked to larger associations such as gender, class, and ethnicity.

      relies on the definition of person which can be politically constituted

    8. mphasizes empowering individuals to take action for their own security and well-being.

      still a liberal lassez-faire approach :(

    9. Human security includes freedom from fear and freedom from want, and encompasses various elements such as economic security, food security, health security, environmental security, personal security, community security, and political security.

      socialist feminist focused on social issues?

    10. wars, conflicts, famine, and poverty are all examples of insecurity that can harm individuals and communities.

      human non conflict issues

    1. "environmental security" and how it can be linked to traditional security ideas.Some view this connection as a positive way to address the threats posed by environmental degradation, while others see it as adding unnecessary complexity to the concept of security.
    2. human security, shifting the focus from states to individuals.
    1. Studs Terkel, the oral historian, was known to admonish friends who would read his books but leave them free of markings. He told them that reading a book should not be a passive exercise, but rather a raucous conversation.

      love "raucous conversation"!

    1. Google Chrome for Android no longer has an option to disable “Pull to Refresh”. For people who don’t really like using this feature, this is pretty annoying. There was a way to disable this using a flag, but version 75 removed this flag too.
    2. I was filling and completing a report on a website, uploaded an attachment just wanted to fill up some remaining inputs on final step, while scrolling down the whole page refreshed!.. hours of work and composition was gone instantly, extremely frustrating!
    3. I stoped using chrome android for purchases, due to the refresh occuring while scrolling up. Poor design choice
    1. meditation is instructors also testified that micro phenomenological interviews 00:31:10 were useful for them on the one hand a more refined awareness of their own practice
      • for: meditation - improvement with micro phenomenological interview
  6. Oct 2023
    1. But sometimes Alter’s comments seem exactly wrong. Alter calls Proverbs 29:2 “no more than a formulation in verse of a platitude,” but Daniel L. Dreisbach’s Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers devotes an entire chapter to that single verse, much loved at the time of the American Founding: “When the righteous are many, a people rejoices, / but when the wicked man rules, a people groans.” Early Americans “widely, if not universally,” embraced the notion that—as one political sermon proclaimed—“The character of a nation is justly decided by the character of their rulers, especially in a free and elective government.” Dreisbach writes, “They believed it was essential that the American people be reminded of this biblical maxim and select their civil magistrates accordingly.” Annual election sermons and other political sermons often had Proverbs 29:2 as “the primary text.” Far from being a platitude, this single verse may contain a cure to the contagion that is contemporary American political life.

      Ungenerous to take Alter to task for context which he might not have the background to comment upon.

      Does Alter call it a "platitude" from it's historical context, or with respect to the modern context of Donald J. Trump and a wide variety of Republican Party members who are anything but Christian?

    1. times of constitutional reform, changes in power between political parties, or revolutionary periods
    2. women's movements have historically advanced their interests by taking advantage of certain political opportunities.
    3. discursive struggle, which involves shaping and controlling political discourse concerning women to influence public policy.
    4. There is tension between feminist movements and political parties, as some movements prefer to maintain autonomy from parties in order to achieve their goals.
    5. feminists did not have a political party to support them, which limited their influence on policies like abortion laws.
    6. success of feminist movements working with left-wing parties varies,
    7. Women are located both externally and internally within institutions, influencing their actions and goals. Other research on Third World women's movements shows their impact on state policies and context.
    1. this Earth shot as we call it that we're aiming for at Earth species project is for machine learning to decode non-human communication and then that new knowledge and understanding that results 00:06:42 from that would reset our relationship with the rest of Nature and you know this is a to me a really compelling as a potential unlock in addressing the biodiversity and climate crisis that 00:06:56 we're saying to help us find new ways to Coexist on the planet with other species
      • for: quote, quote - ESP, quote - interspecies communication, quote - Katie Zacarian, interspecies communication, reconnecting with nature, Stop Reset Go

      • quote

        • this Earth shot as we call it that we're aiming for at Earth species project is for
          • machine learning to decode non-human communication and then
          • that new knowledge and understanding that results from that would RESET our relationship with the rest of Nature
        • and you know this is a to me a really compelling as a potential unlock in addressing the
          • biodiversity and
          • climate crisis
        • that we're saying to help us find new ways to Coexist on the planet with other species
    1. I just try to catch ideas—andsometimes I fall in love with one and then I know what I want to do. Ithas nothing to do with money; just with translating that idea.
  7. Sep 2023
    1. t may be that in using his system hedeveloped his mind and his knowledge of history to the point wherehe expected his readers to draw more inferences from the facts heselected than most modern readers are accustomed to doing, in thisday of the predigested book.

      It's possible that the process of note taking and excerpting may impose levels of analysis and synthesis on their users such that when writing and synthesizing their works that they more subtly expect their readers to do the same thing when their audiences may require more handholding and explanation.

      Here, both the authors' experiences and that of the cultures in which they're writing will determine the relationship.


      There's lots of analogies between thinking and digesting (rumination, consumption, etc), in reading and understanding contexts.

      Source: https://hypothes.is/a/hhCGsljeEe2QlccJUQ55fA

    1. There is one other test of whether you understand the proposition in a sentence you have read. Can you point to some experience you have had that the proposition describes or to which the proposition is in any way relevant?
    1. several varieties of blind spots.
      • for: blind spots, science - blind spots, aware spot, Wittgenstein, Nishada Kitaro, Douglas Harding, BEing journey, finger pointing to the moon, the man with no head

      • paraphrase

        • blind spot by vacancy
          • ie. black area in visual field.
          • contrast with the rest of the visual field
          • easy to see
      • further research start
        • pure blind spot
          • I did not understand
      • further research end
        • aware spot
          • Douglas Harding ( Man without a head) exercise
          • Wittgenstein also commented on this
            • Nothing in your visual field leads you to infer that it is seen by an eye
            • BEing journey
              • point finger to objects in your visual field
              • then point to yourself
              • what do you see? There's no object there
              • it is empty but is the source of awareness
          • Nishada Kitaro
            • As soon as you adopt the stance of objective knowledge, the knower doesn't enter the visual field
    1. Underlines and margin notes in an unknown hand are interspersed throughout the texts. Volume I includes a daily devotional page that has been used as a bookmark. The back endpapers of Volume IV has been copiously annotated.

      Jack Kerouac followed the general advice of Mortimer J. Adler to write notes into the endpapers of his books as evidenced by the endpapers of Volume IV of the 7th Year Course of The Great Books Foundation series with which Adler was closely associated.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rZIpsFE6Yw

      Attended live on 2023-09-07

    2. https://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event/11148297

      9th-century copy of Boethius's Latin translation of Aristotle's De interpretatione, referred to in the manuscript as Periermenias, with the shorter of two commentaries that Boethius wrote on that work. Replacement leaves added in the 11th century to the beginning (f. 1-4) and end (f. 45-64) of the manuscript, in addition to providing the beginning and end of the Boethius (which is probably lacking 2 gatherings between extant gatherings 6 and 7), include the Periermeniae attributed to Apuleius in the medieval period, a poem by Decimus Magnus Ausonius on the seven days of Creation, a sample letter of a monk to an abbot with interlinear and marginal glosses, and other miscellaneous verses, definitions, and excerpts. Dot Porter, University of Pennsylvania, has determined that two groups of leaves are misbound; leaves 5-12 (the original order appears to have been 5, 9, 10, 6, 7, 11, 12, 8) and leaves 53-64 (the original order of the leaves appears to have been 61, 62, 53-60, 63, 64).

    1. Recent work has revealed several new and significant aspects of the dynamics of theory change. First, statistical information, information about the probabilistic contingencies between events, plays a particularly important role in theory-formation both in science and in childhood. In the last fifteen years we’ve discovered the power of early statistical learning.

      The data of the past is congruent with the current psychological trends that face the education system of today. Developmentalists have charted how children construct and revise intuitive theories. In turn, a variety of theories have developed because of the greater use of statistical information that supports probabilistic contingencies that help to better inform us of causal models and their distinctive cognitive functions. These studies investigate the physical, psychological, and social domains. In the case of intuitive psychology, or "theory of mind," developmentalism has traced a progression from an early understanding of emotion and action to an understanding of intentions and simple aspects of perception, to an understanding of knowledge vs. ignorance, and finally to a representational and then an interpretive theory of mind.

      The mechanisms by which life evolved—from chemical beginnings to cognizing human beings—are central to understanding the psychological basis of learning. We are the product of an evolutionary process and it is the mechanisms inherent in this process that offer the most probable explanations to how we think and learn.

      Bada, & Olusegun, S. (2015). Constructivism Learning Theory : A Paradigm for Teaching and Learning.

    1. For those interested in the history of classical education, manuscripts, books, and knowledge transfer, the University of Pennsylvania Libraries and the Shoenberg Institute have a potentially relevant ongoing zoom series called Coffee with a Codex in which they regularly bring out rare manuscripts, codices, incunabula, etc. from their collection to show and discuss.

      Keep in mind that the presentation is done by library curators who may not be subject matter experts on the books they present, but the topics are nearly all relevant to classical education. Most attendees are academics, historians, medievalists, or regularly doing research in the areas of information studies and will often have thoughts, ideas, or experience with classical education, and may be able to answer questions about historical practices in the chat. Presentations are generally informal, short, and meant for a generalist audience. Quite often digital scans of the materials they present are available for browsing online or downloading for further study.

      See the full schedule for Coffee with a Codex three weeks ahead at https://schoenberginstitute.org/coffee-with-a-codex/

      To give folks an idea of the presentations, recordings of Coffee With A Codex since January 2022 are available at their YouTube Playlist. (To my knowledge they don't archive copies of their chat transcripts where the participants are usually fairly active, but some of the chat does make it verbally into the recorded discussion.)

      Of particular interest this coming week is a presentation on a book which will touch on the recent conversation "Ancient Textbooks for Ancient Curriculums?" by u/psimystc with respect to the Carolingian educational program in the 9th-11th centuries.

      https://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event/11148297

      Details

      Date: Thursday, September 7, 2023<br /> Time: 12:00pm - 12:30pm

      Coffee with a Codex: Boethius and Aristotle <br /> On September 7, Curator Dot Porter will bring out LJS 101, a 9th and 11th century copy of Aristotle translated by Boethius, created as part of the Carolingian educational program. See the record: https://franklin.library.upenn.edu/catalog/FRANKLIN_9951865503503681

      Free registration is required. https://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event/11148297

      An informal lunch or coffee time to meet virtually with Kislak curators and talk about one of the manuscripts from Penn's collections. Each week we'll feature a different manuscript and the expertise of one of our curators. Everyone is welcome to attend. Welcome back for 2023-2024!

      Syndication link: https://www.reddit.com/r/ClassicalEducation/comments/16a1oyi/coffee_with_a_codex_at_penn_libraries_recurring/

  8. Aug 2023
    1. Texts are patient conversationalists always waiting for you to write your side of the conversation into the margin before they continue on with their side of the conversation. Sadly, too many readers (students especially) don't realize that there's a conversation going on.

      Link to:<br /> - https://hypothes.is/a/bBwyhkN3Ee6nQNPI5xmSnQ - https://hypothes.is/a/GvRApkN3Ee6LbBPqqX-A5Q

    2. Margins in books and on paper are blank spaces for "dark ideas" asking to be filled in while "reading with a pen in hand" so that the reader can have a conversation with the text.

      Link to https://hypothes.is/a/GvRApkN3Ee6LbBPqqX-A5Q on dark ideas

    1. I find the use of the term “session” within integration tests a bit unfortunate (open_session, etc), since there are also these session objects, which are however different. Maybe replace by “user_session” ?
  9. Jul 2023
    1. Except for beautifully printed or rarely found books, I read almost everything with a pencil in my hand. I mark favorite passages, scribble notes in margins, sometimes even make shopping lists on the end papers.
    1. Abraham Wald
      • example
        • survivorship bias
          • Abraham Wald was a statistican who was tasked by the Allied war effort with understanding how to make the Allied war planes function better.
          • And he was presented with a series of airplanes that had bullet holes throughout them as they had gone from bombing runs over Nazi Germany.
          • And he looked at them, and he saw that there were
            • holes in the wings,
            • holes in the tail,
            • holes in the nose of the plane.
          • And the general said to him, you know, "Based on your statistical expertise, where should we put extra armor?
          • Where should we reinforce the plane?"
          • And most of the people thought they should put them where the bullet holes were.
          • Abraham Wald took one look at this, and he said, "If you put armor over the places where the holes are,
            • you're going to make the planes get shot down more."
          • Because the reality was the places that didn't have bullet holes were the most crucial.
          • The places that had been shot in
            • the fuselage,
            • the middle of the plane where the engine was,
          • those were in Germany, they didn't survive,
            • they were wrecks.
          • So they never made it back to be analyzed.
          • So survivorship bias is a bias where we look at the wrong kinds of data because we only look at what survived.
    2. when we design systems in an intelligent way, we can screen out 00:11:09 and topple the Martin McFifes of this world.
      • key strategy
        • design system to screen out power hungry people
    1. Visualizing a Field of Research With Scientometrics: Climate Change Associated With Major Aquatic Species Production in the World
      • Title
        • Visualizing a Field of Research With Scientometrics: Climate Change Associated With Major Aquatic Species Production in the World
      • Authors
        • Mohamad N. Azra
        • Mohn Iqbal Mohd Noor
        • Yeong Yik Sung
        • Mazlan Abd Ghaffar
      • Date July 13, 2022
      • Source
      • Abstract
        • Climate change research on major aquatic species assists various stakeholders (e.g. policymakers, farmers, funders) in better managing its aquaculture activities and productivity for future food sustainability.
        • However, there has been little research on the impact of climate change on aquatic production, particularly in terms of scientometric analyses.
        • Thus, using the
          • bibliometric and
          • scientometric analysis methods,
        • this study was carried out to determine what research exists on the impact of climate change on aquatic production groups.
        • We focused on
          • finfish,
          • crustaceans, and
          • molluscs.
        • Data retrieved from Web of Science was
          • mapped with CiteSpace and
          • used to assess
            • the trends and
            • current status of research topics
          • on climate change associated with worldwide aquatic production.
        • We identified ocean acidification as an important research topic for managing the future production of aquatic species.
        • We also provided a comprehensive perspective and delineated the need for:
          • i) more international collaboration for research activity focusing on climate change and aquatic production in order to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal by 2030;
          • ii) the incorporation of work from molecular biology, economics, and sustainability.
  10. Jun 2023
    1. Second, the social life of annotation is of greater importance than individual reader response. Annotation must be studied and promoted as a social endeavor that is co-authored by groups of annotators, with interactive media, spanning on-the-ground and online settings, and in response to shared commitments.

      When will we get the civil disobedience version of Mortimer J. Adler's How to Mark a Book?

    1. I would advise you to read with a pen in your hand, and enter in a little book short hints of what you find that is curious or that may be useful; for this will be the best method of imprinting such particulars in your memory, where they will be ready either for practice on some future occasion if they are matters of utility, or at least to adorn and improve your conversation if they are rather points of curiosity.

      Benjamin Franklin letter to Miss Stevenson, Wanstead. Craven-street, May 16, 1760.

      Franklin doesn't use the word commonplace book here, but is actively recommending the creation and use of one. He's also encouraging the practice of annotation, though in commonplace form rather than within the book itself.

    1. Don’t confuse Consent Mode with Additional Consent Mode, a feature that allows you to gather consent for Google ad partners that are not yet part of the Transparency and Consent Framework but are on Google’s Ad Tech Providers (ATP) list.
  11. May 2023
    1. You will talk with people from hundreds and thousands of years ago from places and ways of life that are long gone or are simply impossible for you to know any other way. And this is not just a cheap alternative to traveling – this is how you become more human.

      Example of a teacher talking about the great conversation in the framing of the humanities....

    1. there is this growing Chasm between our Paleolithic brains and what we're designed for and the niches we're built to inhabit and this new technologically infused world that we're living in
      • Comment

        • Elise says
          • "there is this growing Chasm between
            • our Paleolithic brains and
            • what we're designed for and
              • the niches we're built to inhabit and this new technologically infused world that we're living in
          • We have changed our environment so rapidly and so radically and we have not kept pace with that change
            • so either we keep changing the environment or
            • we change ourselves to fit the environment and
            • I think the fact that we're consistently making these commodified decisions in which
              • we do expunge more and more of our of our Humanity in favor of profit
              • in favor of short-term decisions i
              • n favor of such abysmal thinking when it comes to complex systems like the human body
            • it is a testament to the fact that these brains are not built for this world and
            • we are not going to be adequate stewards of this system
              • that is now so complex that to keep it held together
            • you actually need a new form of intelligence beyond what we are"
        • Elise Bohan' statements perfectly echo Ronald Wright's famous quote on the nature of progress traps
      • comment

        • I think, however, that Wright would agree more with Mary and less with Elise in Elise's contention that
          • we need a new form of intelligence beyond what we are
          • applying progress to our own cognitive abilities
            • may create the biggest progress trap of all
    1. Patricia Highsmith | American Author | Good Afternoon | 1978

      Patricia Highsmith talks a bit about her writing process. She talks about her early family life and her current personal life, but doesn't mention her sexuality at all.

      The tail end of the interview mentions the prevalence for murder within one's family. (When did this truism emerge within culture or at least within the crime space?)

    1. Within the pantheon of types of notes there are: - paraphrasing notes, which one can use to summarize ideas for later recall and review as well as to check one's own knowledge and understanding of what an author has said. - commentary notes, which take the text and create a commentary on them, often as part of having a conversation with the text. These can be seen historically in the Midrashim tradition of commenting on Torah.

      [23:12 - 24:47]


      separately also: - productivity notes - to do lists, reminders of work to be done, often within or as part of a larger complex project

    1. Not everyone values marginalia, said Paul Ruxin, a member of the Caxton Club. “If you think about the traditional view that the book is only about the text,” he said, “then this is kind of foolish, I suppose.”

      A book can't only be about the text, it has to be about the reader's interaction with it and thoughts about it. Without these, the object has no value.

      Annotations are the traces left behind of how one valued a book as they read and interacted with it.

  12. Apr 2023
    1. From this striving, otherwise than in the case of the intellectuals, there results also another statement of the problem, and new perspectives are opened. In this way conceptions are formed regarding the regulation of the mutual relations of human beings in social production, conceptions which to the intellectual elements appear incomprehensible and which they declare to be utopian and unrealizable. But these conceptions have already unfolded a powerful force in the revolutionary uprisings of the wage-workers, of the modern proletarians. This force was shown first on a major scale in the Paris Commune, which sought to overcome the centralized authority of the State through the self-administration of the communes. It was the cause also of Marx’s giving up his idea (expressed in the Communist Manifesto) that state economy would lead to the disappearance of class society. In the workers’ and soldiers’ councils of the Russian and German revolutions of 1917-23, it arose once more to a mighty and at times all-mastering power. And in future no proletarian-revolutionary movement is conceivable in which it will not play a more and more prominent and finally all-mastering role. It is the self-activity of the broad working masses which manifests itself in the workers’ councils. Here is nothing utopian any longer; it is actual reality. In the workers’ councils the proletariat has shaped the organizational form in which it conducts its struggle for liberation.
    1. Nonetheless, there remains still an unbalanced contradiction between on one hand Marx's characterization of the Paris Commune as the finally discovered "political form" for accomplishing the economic and social self-liberation of the working class and, on the other hand, his emphasis at the same time that the suitability of the commune for this purpose rests mainly on its formlessness; that is, on its indeterminateness and openness to multiple interpretations. It appears there is only one point at which Marx's position is perfectly clear and to which he professed at this time under the influence of certain political theories he had in the meantime come up against and which were incorporated in this original political concept-and not least under the practical impression of the enormous experience of the Paris Commune itself. While in the Communist Manifesto of 1847-48 and likewise in the Inaugural Address to the International Workers' Association in 1864, he still had only spoken of the necessity “for the proletariat to conquer political power” now the experiences of the Paris Commune provided him with the proof that "the working class can not simply appropriate the ready-made state machinery and put it into motion for its own purposes, but it must smash the existing bourgeois state machinery in a revolutionary way." This sentence has since been regarded as an essential main proposition and core of the whole political theory of Marxism, especially since in 1917 Lenin at once theoretically restored the unadulterated Marxian theory of the state in his work "State and Revolution" and practically realized it through carrying through the October Revolution as its executor. But obviously nothing positive is at all yet said about the formal character of the new revolutionary supreme state power of the proletariat with the merely negative determination that the state power cannot simply "appropriate the state machinery" of the previous bourgeois state "for the working class and set it in motion for their own purposes." So we must ask: for which reasons does the "Commune" in its particular, determinate form represent the finally discovered political form of government for the working class, as Marx puts it in his Civil War, and as Engels characterizes it once more at great length in his introduction to the third edition of the Civil War twenty years later? Whatever gave Marx and Engels, those fiery admirers of the centralized system of revolutionary bourgeois dictatorship realized by the great French Revolution, the idea to regard precisely the "Commune" as the "political form" of the revolutionary dictatorship of the proletariat, when it appeared to be the complete opposite to that system?
    1. Oakeshott saw educationas part of the ‘conversation of mankind’, wherein teachers induct their studentsinto that conversation by teaching them how to participate in the dialogue—howto hear the ‘voices’ of previous generations while cultivating their own uniquevoices.

      How did Michael Oakeshott's philosophy overlap with the idea of the 'Great Conversation' or 20th century movement of Adler's Great Books of the Western World.

      How does it influence the idea of "having conversations with the text" in the annotation space?

  13. Mar 2023
    1. Ten years from now,

      I have always thought that you learn more in General Ed classes than classes dedicated to your major. Not to say learning about the innerworkings of magnets is a useless skill it is not, but you can definitely take a lot more from history or philosophy classes. But more than anything, you will not take anything from a class if you don't put in effort.

    1. Pretend you’re the curator at a museum devoted just to you. How would you present your artifacts to visitors?

      ME! I would make into a story. Assuming that I faked my death or AI is very powerful it can replicate me, I would start the museum tour in my birth and move on into my "death" . Where every year is another artifact like cloths I wore, the backpacks I had, and I would even display figures of me doing stuff similar to animals in there natural habitat.

    1. Teachers should be better trained in detecting the signs of superior ability. Every child who consistently gets high marks in his school work with apparent ease should be given a mental examination, and if his intelligence level warrants it he should either be given extra promotions, or placed in a special class for superior children where faster progress can be made. The latter is the better plan, because it obviates the necessity of skipping grades; it permits rapid but continuous progress.

      I agree that teachers should be able to identify the superior ability in children. Teachers are around children for 8 hours of the day if in elementary, see them everyday, and have interactions with the students. They should be able to identify which students are superior and which students are feeble-minded. Many children that are superior are misunderstood in schools. I think a mental examination is efficient for superior children that way they can advance faster if they are superior. I think this is important to the history of psychology because it was stated "Teachers should be better trained in detecting signs of superior ability" and we now have teachers able to identify which students are superior and put them in GT classes. GT classes are called the gifted and talented. Students with high intelligence that are superiors are put into those classes which provide benefit to them because the classes are matched with their intelligence. We have advanced to understanding superior ability and have started putting children in special classes where they can continue to make progress.

    1. In my life thinking critically looks like reflecting on your past and history to guide you with your decision making in the future. There may not be an exact situation from the past that will be the answer, but there could be a scenario that is similar that you can use to help influence your future decision making skills.

    1. Using information and ethically for me pretty much sums up to, giving credit where credit is due and using data to help you with decision making. In my job we collect data from students which helps us get funding for my program. I understand that, if we are not getting positive growth in our data then we run the risk of loosing funding. So I understand the importance of data.

    1. Understand and value differences to me means, being open minded and the use of cultural relativism. To me it is incredibly important to be accepting and understanding of other people's cultures and customs. Whenever someone would acknowledge my culture I would always feel very proud of it. So I want to repay that and give the respect that all differences deserve.

    1. Communicating effectively to me just means getting the message out with the shortest amount of words with the same impact. I do a lot of presentations for my job which requires me to change the way how I talk with varying groups of kids so being able to deliver the message as short and sweet as possible is effective communication.

    1. It will also be interdisciplinary because you, the author, are informed by many disciplines.

      I remember in UNVI 101 the importance of knowing and understanding the many different perspectives that there are (artist, humanist...) Understanding the works of how different people view things is important.

    1. truth is that no one who has ever grown in a meaningful way was truly “ready” for it.

      Often time we are our own biggest bullies. Lemony Snicket once said, “If we wait until we're ready, we'll be waiting for the rest of our lives.”

      I really appreciate that Lucas still self reflects on his past rather then forgetting about it completely and starting a new life.

    1. I am most at ease in an activity when I understand how my thoughts shape the feelings I bring to an experience

      I really like what Brian is saying here, It is really hard to see how easily our identities can change from one accident.

      Zig Ziglar once said, "The first step in solving a problem is to recognize that it does exist."

    1. How have you been shaped — personally, academically, professionally — by your college experience so far?

      I'm still very new to the UofA but it has been a great experience. Taking some Gen Ed's gave me a lot of really eye opening experiences. I took an Intro to African American Hip Hop and I enjoyed that course a lot. I've learned that Gen Ed's are usually the most fun courses where you will learn a lot.

  14. opentextbooks.library.arizona.edu opentextbooks.library.arizona.edu
    1. lifelong process

      The Lifelong learning assignment from UNVI 101 was a lot of fun making. I hope we can make something similar in 301.

  15. Feb 2023
    1. sometimes I’m afraid I’m more fighting the tools than doing research. Sometimes it seems to me there’s too much friction, and not the productive kind.

      relation to Note taking problem and proposed solution?

      This seems to be a common reality and/or fear.