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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Feb 2021
  3. Jan 2021
    1. When Snap was introduced Canonical promised it would never replace APT. This promise was broken. Some APT packages in the Ubuntu repositories not only install snap as a dependency but also run snap commands as root without your knowledge or consent and connect your computer to the remote proprietary store operated by Canonical.
    2. Although it is open-source, Snap on the other hand, only works with the Ubuntu Store. Nobody knows how to make a Snap Store and nobody can. The Snap client is designed to work with only one source, following a protocol which isn’t open, and using only one authentication system. Snapd is nothing on its own, it can only work with the Ubuntu Store.
    1. Snaps each pick a ‘base’, for example, Ubuntu18 (corresponding to the set of minimal debs in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS). Nevertheless, the choice of base does not impact on your ability to use a snap on any of the supported Linux distributions or versions — it’s a choice of the publisher and should be invisible to you as a user or developer.

      Snaps sound a lot like container images in this respect.

    2. Ubuntu also supports ‘snap’ packages which are more suited for third-party applications and tools which evolve at their own speed, independently of Ubuntu. If you want to install a high-profile app like Skype or a toolchain like the latest version of Golang, you probably want the snap because it will give you fresher versions and more control of the specific major versions you want to track.
    1. sudo apt purge chromium-browser chromium-chromedriver Bye bye, fake Chromium packages.
    2. Debian still maintains Chromium as a regular package in their APT repository. We can configure Ubuntu to get it from there, and continue to receive timely security updates along with all of our other OS updates. This makes sense from a security perspective, since Debian is where Ubuntu already gets most of its packages, and is a very well known high-profile project. There is no need to risk installing software from some random source or telling your system to trust a PPA.
    3. I have nothing against snap in theory, but spamming my mounts, processes, and filesystem is just too darn much
    1. "in the Ubuntu 20.04 package base, the Chromium package is indeed empty and acting, without your consent, as a backdoor by connecting your computer to the Ubuntu Store. Applications in this store cannot be patched, or pinned. You can't audit them, hold them, modify them or even point snap to a different store. You've as much empowerment with this as if you were using proprietary software, i.e. none."
    1. the bloody mount points. I couldn't believe that when I realised what was going on. I got the wire brush and dettol out and scraped it off my drive. Never, ever again.
    2. It won't work if $HOME is not under /home. Really. Not even if you softlink. You need a bind mount
    3. There's a lot of advice online showing how to get rid of snap. (e.g.: https://cialu.net/how-to-disable-and-remove-completely-snaps-in-ubuntu-linux/ worked for me) so the only result (so far, a few months later) is that Chromium has lost a user, and having upgraded Ubuntu since the original Warty, if snap becomes obligatory I'll have to take a look at Mint, or Devuan.
    4. I managed to remove it myself this morning...apparently it used to get it's hooks in so deep it was very difficult to remove the daemon as it interconnected with ubuntu-desktop for....reasons.
    5. Good. Hate snap. It's insidious and a pain to deal with.
    6. Plus, have you seen how many loopback mounting points it creates? "df" becomes very hard to use as it buries your actual drives with it's own. One for the daemon, one for GTK, one for Gnome, one for each of the snaps you have installed....
    7. it's an absolute resource hog
    8. Besides running contrary to the principles that lead a lot of people to Linux systems (a closed store that you can't alter...automatic updates you have no control over....run by just the one company)
    9. The strangest "quirk" I had was that I couldn't get the web browser to save a file directly to an attached, encrypted drive. Permissions problem. So I had to save to an interim folder then move it across by hand. Utter pain.
    10. So they want to "reduce fragmentation" OK.
    11. I found that snap can cause lots of issues. I installed keepass using snap, and it installed as a sandboxed app. Very nice for security you would think. Well, a short while later, after 3 upgrades to keepass, it deleted the oldest snap container, which just happened to contain my password file. So secure that even you can't use your passwords now!
    12. Call me cynical, but is Snap possibly a resource hog as well?
    13. It appears that Canonical is continuing it's vice grip of unliateral, maybe dictatorial control on the development of Snap to the benefit of Ubuntu, but to the detriment of groups like Linuxmint, and all other non-Ubuntu based Linux distributions - like CentOS/Redhat, Suse/openSuSe, Solus, Arch/Manjaro, PCLinuxOS, etc, that are pushing Flatpak as a truly cross-distro application solution that works equally well and non-problematic for all. .
    14. If upstream code presumes things will work that dont in snap (e.g. accesses /tmp or /etc) the snap maintainer has to rewrite that code and maintain a fork. Pointless work. Packaging for .deb is a no-brainer.
    15. It's Snap that drove me to Arch, so it did me a huge favour. Seeing things like GNOME as a snap and other 'core' products wasn't something I was comfortable with. Personally, I prefer flatpaks as a packaging format when compared to snap and appimage. I agree that Linux needs an app delivery format, but snap's current implementation isn't it.
    16. By design, snap apps have no access to /etc. They live in their own little world, but instead of a normal chroot, they are splatted all over the standard Linux filesystem layout. With other bits mounted hither and thither. Its a mess, and subject to change with each release.
    17. The cost of snap is too high. Its Linux ffs. We want it lean, mean, open, stable, file based, and bash friendly. We want our tools to work together, and above all, we want choice. Snap is none of that.
    18. Its not too complicated but it is an annoyance. I want /etc/hosts, /etc/resolv.conf, /etc/nsswitch.conf, /etc/rc.local and all the standard stuff to work. The heavy lifting is done in the kernel. All they need to do is leave it alone. Its getting harder to make Ubuntu behave like Linux.
    19. Did my first Xubuntu 20.04 LTS last month: no (dependency) trouble at all to remove snap and its systemd tentacles...
    20. My biggest issue with snap is not the concept per se but that it's a mostly Ubuntu thing and FlatPak and AppImage are similar ideas. For once it would be nice if the Linux world would consolidate around a single technology instead of fragmenting like this.
    21. If we're not careful, it could become the new 'systemd' problem It probably already is. I don't want to sound too Stallman, but this is the inevitable "company" influence you'll always have. Companies do have their objectives which they will pursue determinedly, since they are not philanthropic (no judgment, just observation). Systemd and Red Hat. Nvidia and their drivers. Google and Android. Apple and iOS. Manufacturers with MS only support. And Canonical also has a history there: the Amazon links, Unity, Mir, and now snap.
    1. The rationale for branches is simple. Each snap in the Snap Store has a default track called ‘latest’ in which there are four channels named ‘stable’, ‘beta’, ‘candidate’ and ‘edge’. These are all typical buckets in which snaps are published for an extended period, perhaps months or maybe even years. Branches on the other hand are short-lived silos for publishing snaps. 
    1. The downside is the installation files are bigger than the traditional Debian package manager (DEB) files. They also use more hard drive real estate. With snaps, every application that needs a particular resource installs its own copy. This isn’t the most efficient use of hard drive space. Although hard drives are getting bigger and cheaper, traditionalists still balk at the extravagance of each application running in its own mini-container. Launching applications is slower, too.
    2. The application is executed in an encapsulated, ring-fenced way, so its files can’t interfere with those on your computer. You can even install multiple versions of the same application, and they won’t cross-pollinate or fight amongst themselves.
    3. The upside to snaps is they make installations simpler because they avoid the heartache of dependency hell. This is what occurs when a new application can’t run either because a required resource isn’t available, it’s the wrong version, or its installation overwrites files required by existing applications so they can’t run.
    1. The chromium browser has been available as a deb package for all supported Ubuntu releases and as a snap since version 60, and the time has come to start transitioning away from the debs.
    1. All right, whoever, who wanted to get the latest Chromium work without worrying about snaps, get it from here 15, unzip it and make a executable link to executive file “chrome” in it. It opens instantaneously (in a snap). This Chromium web browser is NOT installed, but lives in a folder called chrome-linux.
    2. Just saying “snaps are slow” is not helpful to anyone. Because frankly, they’re not. Some might be, but others aren’t. Using blanket statements which are wildly inaccurate will not help your argument. Bring data to the discussion, not hearsay or hyperbole.
    3. I don’t find the software slow, I find the startup time for snap packages when the start for the first time on a session slow, but that has been improved, and it’s public that the snapcraft team has been working hard to improve that.
    4. None of what I’ve said is provided out of the box with apt/deb, and they can only be done in ways that are way to much complex for most non-technical users and in some points they require more work, and some things are simply not available with apt/deb, like the possibility to isolate dependencies, app confinement at the level snaps provide, the possibility to use the same package on other distros (including those that don’t have apt/deb) and different versions of the distro (same package will work on old and new versions independently on how it was built…
    5. This example of the chromium really shows that unless snaps or other similar format was used, applications would have to be sometime very heavily patched to work on older versions of systems to the point that it generates so much work that it would not be worth do to it otherwise, or at least not worth when the snap option exists and doesn’t require that much more work.
    6. But now Chromium is no more available as deb, so what to expect ?
    7. I had one issue with snap and that involved VLC but I can see how it would lead to issues with other packages. I hav the libdvdcss2 package installed to allow me to watch DVDs on my laptop. The snap version of VLC was not aware of that and wouldn’t play the DVD. I had to uninstall the snap and install the .deb package. Just one example, but I know there will be others. Due to the quasi-legal nature of libdvdcss2, I doubt it’ll ever be bundled in a VLC snap package.
    8. snaps have many benefits that are huge: automatic updates List item shorter delivery times between develper and user possibility to use tracks and choose how much on the bleeding edge you want to be way more security and privacy, less dependency issues software available on the same versions independently of distributions and versions of distributions
    9. Moreover, due to the confinement, snap does not allow Chromium to download by default in another folder than /home : “it won’t let the application see files on the host system (save for a few exceptions, like $HOME)”. Is it a definitive point for snap ? If yes, it means that when all apps will be converted to snap without possible backport to debs (if installed without --classic and perhaps excepted Nautilus), it will be impossible to save files issued from them elsewhere than in /home ? Absolutely all my datas (documents, music, videos, photos) are on other partitions, this would be prohibitive…
    10. If folks want to get together and create a snap-free remix, you are welcome to do so. Ubuntu thrives on such contribution and leadership by community members. Do be aware that you will be retreading territory that Ubuntu developers trod in 2010-14, and that you will encounter some of the same issues that led them to embrace snap-based solutions. Perhaps your solutions will be different. .debs are not perfect, snaps are not perfect. Each have advantages and disadvantages. Ubuntu tries to use the strengths of both.
    11. The “no-snaps” ship already sailed years ago…you folks missed that boat. It’s too late to wish for a return to the past. Snaps in Ubuntu have been happening for years already, and will continue regardless of any opinions expressed here.
    1. If you’re not a huge fan of Snap packages, but love using Ubuntu, this guide is for you. In it, we’ll go over how you can remove Snap from your Ubuntu system and make it so that your system will no longer have access to the Snap store or anything like that.
    2. Snap packages are quickly becoming the primary way that Ubuntu users consume software. Despite Snaps dominating Ubuntu, many users still opt to avoid Snap packages in favor of Apt packages that have long been available in Ubuntu.
    3. Sadly, unlike Apt, it isn’t possible to uninstall all of these packages in bulk. You must manually remove each one of these packages by hand.
  4. Feb 2020
    1. It can be easier to apply for farm subsidies than it is to get SNAP benefits, said Joel Berg, a former official with the Department of Agriculture, the agency that administers both programs.
  5. Nov 2019
    1. voeg

      Het snap blok heet voeg … … samen

    2. herhaal, altijd, en voor

      In Snap-NL heten de blokken: herhaal (forever) herhaal invoer keer for Het for-blok is nog steeds niet vertaald ...

    3. zet

      maak

    4. zet

      zet het op -> maak het (vanwege Snap blok maak variabele waarde)

    5. command

      In de Nederlandse Snap vertaling: commando

  6. Jun 2017
    1. some analysts expressed concern about a slowdown in the growth of its Snapchat messaging app.

      Snap's time has passed? Or was it the fact that I downloaded it?